Sightseeing in Oneida

Select Local Merchants

Established: 1985

Handicap Accessible: Yes

Parking: Parking lot

Most Popular Attraction/Offering: Dry docks, blacksmith shop, canal boat

Recommended Age Group: All ages

Q&A with a Member on the Board of Trustees

What is the experience like?

?The best field trip ever??school children from all over Central New York share this sentiment when they visit Chittenango Landing Canal Boat Museum. Last year, over 1,800 school children learned about the Erie Canal, boat building, [and] life on a canal boat, and they experienced what it is like to be a real archaeologist searching for historic artifacts while enjoying our top-notch education program. An award-winning historic site, the Chittenango Landing Canal Boat Museum preserves the history of the only restored historic dry dock on the canal and shares the story of the Erie Canal?s role in making New York the Empire State.

Is there anything else you want to add that we didn't cover?

Walk along the Erie Canal to the stone aqueduct. Bring or rent a bike and explore along the path where Sal the mule walked from Buffalo to Albany pulling the canal boats loaded with New York state agricultural products, and see the sites that thousands of immigrants from Ireland and all of Europe first saw as they traveled on the Erie Canal to settle western New York and the states west [of there].

717 Lakeport Rd
Chittenango,
NY
US

Established: 2004

Reservations/Appointments: Optional

Staff Size: 2?10 people

Average Duration of Services: 1?2 hours

Handicap Accessible: Yes

Parking: Parking lot

Recommended Age Group: Adults

The year was 1889. Harlow E. Bundy, an entrepreneur by trade and nature teamed up with his brother, Willard Bundy, to market the time recorder. Willard worked as a jeweler and inventor, and combining his expertise with his brother's business savvy, the two founded Bundy Manufacturing Company. After working in Binghamton, the brothers' company moved to Endicott and changed names. Today, people know it as IBM.

The brother's legacy still stands in Binghamton, though, in the form of Harlow Bundy's one-time house, now the center of the Bundy Museum of History and Art. The museum preserves not only the story of the brothers, but also the history and artwork of the region that inspired them. The collection includes a wide array of early manufacturing implements, broadcasting tools, and even a life-sized recreation of the Bundy's booth from the 1893 World's Fair. The curators run an open art gallery that showcases different artists every month, as well as an African Gallery focusing on ancestral and ceremonial African artifacts. There's even a vintage barbershop on the campus, a recreation of the one that stood next to IBM's original Endicott headquarters.

129 Main St
Binghamton,
NY
US

The National Museum of Dance and Hall of Fame covers everything from the history of dance in Harlem to the innovations of famous dancers. Exhibits containing videos, artifacts, and costumes explore traditional and modern dance from a variety of cultural groups and class backgrounds. To share a passion for dance with the community, the museum also hosts classes through the Lewis A. Swyer School for the Arts.

99 S Broadway
Saratoga Springs,
NY
US

In an effort to ignite the creative spirits of the Adirondack area’s residents, View regularly hosts events and activities focused on and inspired by the fine arts. Workshops center around hands-on instruction in various artistic mediums, such as woodworking, jewelry making, and photography. The organization’s calendar also features performances, exhibitions, and special events ranging from antiques shows to waterfront house tours done atop party barges or herds of saddled alligators. Located in Old Forge, View’s new 28,000-square-foot LEED-certified building serves as a hub for the group’s activities, housing fine arts studios, exhibition galleries, and a performance hall.

3273 Highway 28
Old Forge,
NY
US

The locomotives were just becoming commonplace in the early 19th century, when the New York Central and Hudson River railroads were completed. A member of the legendary Vanderbilt family, Dr. William Webb capitalized on unfolding innovations by privately financing a railroad to his hunting preserve in the Adirondack Mountains. The route wound through treacherous terrain via 17 bridges and numerous service buildings, some of which still are still used to trick time-travelers into thinking they're finally home. Despite these complications, the tracks materialized within just 18 months and were soon whisking the Vanderbilts and other wealthy families to their opulent wilderness estates.

After several decades in disrepair, the tracks were rehabilitated by the railroad enthusiasts of Adirondack Scenic Railroad, who resurrected an initial four-mile stretch in 1992. Since having the railroad officially declared a Historic Place, they continue to unveil new sections, eventually securing routes from Utica to Carter Station, and between Saranac Lake and Lake Placid. Today, retro locomotives, some built as early as the 1940s, chug through the rippling rivers and wildlife-rich forests of 600-million-acre Adirondack Park, letting passengers drink in the view. Though the railcars boast vintage touches, such as mahogany paneling haunted by the ghosts of Franklin Pierce, they are equipped with modern touches including air conditioning and fully loaded kitchens.

Many Adirondack Scenic Railroad rides provide other entertainments to supplement scenery. In the Doo Wop Train, waitresses from ?50s-themed The Soda Fountain in Remsen pump up patrons for a mid-century feast at the eatery while en route to Remsen Station. Other themed excursions ooze with intrigue, including murder mysteries and train robberies, while some more laid-back jaunts simply convey riders to historically-rich towns such as Old Forge.

321 Main St.
Utica,
NY
US

When Utica Zoo opened its gates 98 years ago, three fallow deer comprised its entire animal population. Today, visitors can traipse the zoo's walking trails to view more than 200 animals, including alligators, bald eagles, zebras, and an African lion. The zoo also provides a safe haven for threatened species such as snowy owls and mexican spider monkeys. Staff members guide tours and conduct presentations, allowing visitors to get a close look at animals.

99 Steele Hill Road
Utica,
NY
US