Groceries & Markets in Oregon

Hand Crafted Fruit Extracts and Nut Butters at Meso Nutso (Up to 53% Off). Two Options Available.

Meso Nutso

Coburg

Made from scratch products include tropical flavored nut mixes, spicy almonds, and tasty fruit extracts

$25 $12

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Wine Tasting for Two or Four Plus a Bottle of Wine at Walnut City WineWorks (50% Off)

Walnut City WineWorks

McMinnville

Sample at least five varietals in the winery’s tasting room, then take home a bottle of Willamette Valley pinot noir

$30 $15

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$7 for $13 Worth of Produce and Natural Foods at Spicer Brothers Produce

Spicer Brothers Produce

Oregon City

Locally grown produce and natural food items from nearby dairies, bakeries, and companies such as Bob’s Red Mill

$13 $7

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$17 for $30 Worth of Wine — Koi Pond Cellars

Koi Pond Cellars

Ridgefield

From the merchant: Enjoy a visit to Koi Pond Cellars’ brand new tasting room in historic downtown Ridgefield. Hand-crafted wine.

$30 $17

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Organic and Local Grocery Items and Supplements at Total Health (Up to 56% Off). Two Options Available.

Total Health

Fruitland

Vitamins, raw milk, gluten-free items, baking products, snacks, pet food, essential oils, and more organic and local goods

$20 $10

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$10 for $20 Worth of Chocolates, Caramel Apples, and Candies at Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory

Cal Young

Granny Smith apples coated in hand-made caramel, fudge made fresh in copper kettles, and candies ranging from chocolate truffles to toffee

$20 $10

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Select Local Merchants

Many traditional artists paint linen or sculpt stone. For an agri-artist such as Craig Easterly, though, a cornfield makes a perfectly good canvas. For more than a decade, Craig has been chiseling through the 12-foot stalks of his 5-acre field to create what is from the ground a maze of rustling green tunnels and from above a stunning tableau of Portland themes and images. "I like to create designs that resonate with Portlanders and our friends in the greater Portland area," he said in a 2011 press release. One year, his work cut the city's bridges and rivers into the corn; in another he incorporated the Portland Timbers insignia into his maze.

Many traditional artists paint linen or sculpt stone. For an agri-artist such as Craig Easterly, though, a cornfield makes a perfectly good canvas. For more than a decade, Craig has been chiseling through the 12-foot stalks of his 5-acre field to create what is from the ground a maze of rustling green tunnels and from above a stunning tableau of Portland themes and images. "I like to create designs that resonate with Portlanders and our friends in the greater Portland area," he said in a 2011 press release. One year, his work cut the city's bridges and rivers into the corn; in another he incorporated the Portland Timbers insignia into his maze.

Each fall, these Sauvie Island fields birth both Craig's famous corn maze and its evil twin, the Haunted Maize, which spooks its visitors at night with costumed actors and eerie animatronics. Along with its mazes, The Maize at The Pumpkin Patch also sprouts fall-centric family-friendly activities. Overall-clad patrons bounce along on free hayrides, get crowned king of the hay mountain, or mimic the beastly accents of farm animals in the big red barn.

16511 NW Gillihan Rd
Portland,
OR
US

The accolades accorded several of LaVelle Vineyards' wines in the pages of Wine Enthusiast magazine serves as evidence of the diligent work of founder Doug LaVelle and his son, Matthew, who tends the vines today. After taking over the winery?then one of the oldest in Southern Willamette Valley?in 1994, Doug took it upon himself to make a number of improvements to its antiquated technology and distribution network. He started the wine club in 1995, and just recently opened a brand new wine bar and tap room off of International Way in Springfield called the LaVelle Tap Room. The tap room serves as an in-town location for wine club members, but also to provide a new wine-bar-meets-tap-room experience with more than 30 wines to choose from and several local beers on tap.

Doug's investments paid off. Today, with Matthew as lead winemaker, the winery ferments grapes both from its original Willamette Valley location and another site in the Columbia Valley in eastern Washington. At the rustic Elmira winery, visitors can recline on the sunny deck, tour the winemaking facilities, or outsmart tipsy minotaurs in the garden's labyrinth.

89697 Sheffler Road
Elmira,
OR
US

In the mild climes of the Willamette Valley, gentle slopes and low elevation nurture the 35 acres of wine grapes that produce Ankeny Vineyard's collection of pinot noir, pinot gris, and other signature wines. Vineyard owner Joe Olexa planted his first grapes in 1982, and with the help of winemaker Andy Thomas, the varietals have stood the test of time to become perennial award-winners at the Oregon State Fair and beyond. Visitors converse on the winery's patio over glasses of pinot noir and mélange blanc, surveying the scenic Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge and its droves of migratory waterfowl. An onsite outdoor, wood-burning pizza oven allows for wines to balance with the flavors of melted cheese on weekends during the summer months, which will have to suffice until cheese agrees to be bottled.

2565 Riverside Rd S
Salem,
OR
US

From cracking two-row malted barley in a roller mill to carbonating at 31 degrees Fahrenheit, brewer Adam Roberts’s five-step process yields each of 4th Street Brewing Co.’s handcrafted beers. A window in the brewpub’s restaurant lets patrons take a peek at the working microbrewing equipment, which churn out the ales, porters, and IPAs that make up the five mainstay brews. Adam also crafts seasonal beer selections such as the Get Jiggy Wit It, a belgian white ale, and the czech pilsner.

In the kitchen, Chef Abe uses locally raised, organic ingredients to craft pub food that complements Adam’s beers. Those dishes include beer-battered onion rings by the pound or half-pound, charbroiled or stone-oven-baked pizzas with toppings such as IPA barbecue sauce and artichoke hearts, and a pork-fillet sandwich topped with french fries. Meals unfold in a spacious dining room where sports flicker across nine high-definition televisions and magician Brian Proctor dazzles diners every Friday night by performing card tricks and magically, with only the use of minutes, turning once hot dishes into lukewarm ones. 4th Street also accommodates private feasts in two party rooms equipped with amenities such as a 78-inch projection screen and a private bar.

77 NE 4th St
Gresham,
OR
US

In 1993, Casey Miller got his first job at The Meating Place, a local meat market that first opened in 1974. Then a freshman in high school, Casey started sweeping up the Hillsboro butcher's shop part-time, but by graduation, he had worked his way into an assistant-manager position. The shop closed its doors in 1998, but Casey and original owner Steve Crossley teamed up to reopen the custom meat-cutting business and showcase meat exclusively sourced from area farms. Following family recipes, the butchery smokes all sorts of proteins, including beer sausage, salmon, and jerky, and carves sustainably raised beef and pork into custom cuts or busts of George Washington. Hunters and fishermen also turn over their own wild game for The Meating Place pros to process. Butchers grind locally sourced alpaca meat, fresh or smoked bones, and seasonal vegetables into raw dog food that makes pets' coats shine and teeth glisten while also encouraging healthy digestion.

6585 NW Cornelius Pass Rd
Hillsboro,
OR
US

Growing up on a farm granted Ryan and Shane Stonemetz a firsthand look at the injustices of the industrial-food market. The brothers watched their father and grandfather toil daily to make ends meet and subsequently swore off entering the family business. However, as the pair established their adult lives in Portland and Seattle, they realized that injustices live forever unless someone puts up a fight.

And so began ProFarm Produce, a small farm-to-customer enterprise that lowers prices for shoppers and increases wages for farmers by eliminating the middleman. The company started with nothing more than a 12-foot truck and a bed full of organic cherries, but it has since grown to a fleet of trucks thanks to an extra-potent fertilizer that's safe for automobiles' digestion. The expanding staff transports ProFarm's bounty to 20 area farmers' markets and various wholesale clients. ProFarm also participates in a CSA program that provides weekly boxes of fresh, local produce to participants in surrounding communities.

SW Hall Blvd. & 3rd Ave
Beaverton,
OR
US