Sightseeing in Owensboro

Visit for Two, Four, or Six to Adsmore House & Gardens (50% Off)

Adsmore House & Gardens

Princeton

$14 $7

Living history museum allows visitors to experience daily life in the early 1900s at a picturesque house and surrounding gardens

Family Membership for Up to Eight or Admission for Two or Four to Historic Railpark & Train Museum (Up to 53% Off)

Historic Railpark & Train Museum

Bowling Green

$75 $35

Self-guided or guided tours take you through railroad history with stops at restored train cars, exhibits, and a model train set

Winery Tour and Wine Tasting for Two or Four with Souvenir Glasses at Forest Edge Winery (Up to 53% Off)

Forest Edge Winery

Shepherdsville

$20 $10

Cozy winery with family-driven theme hosts tours and tastings before sending guests home with souvenir signature glasses

Slenderman Experience for Two at Asylum Haunted Scream Park (Up to 40% Off). 12 Dates and Times Available.

Asylum Haunted Scream Park

Louisville

$20 $12

Twosomes sneak into the woods armed with only a flashlight to seek out eight pages and avoid confrontation with a terror-inducing boogeyman

Haunted-House Visit for Two, Four, or Six to The 7th Street Haunt (Up to 56% Off)

The 7th Street Haunt

Louisville

$18 $9

Chainsaw-wielding pyschos and demented doctors inside a more than 13,000 sq. ft. haunted house keep guests screaming as late as 2 a.m.

90-Minute Walking Ghost Tour for Two, Four, or Six from Louisville Ghost Walks (Up to 53% Off)

Louisville Ghost Walks

Central Business District

$30 $15

Friday-night walking ghost tours explore Louisville's haunted halls such as hotels, theaters, and old historic homes

Admission for Two, Four, or a Family of Five at Riverside, the Farnsley-Moreman Landing (Up to 42% Off)

Riverside, the Farnsley-Moremen Landing

Southwest Louisville

$12 $7

Explore a historic farm site on the Ohio River with a 1837 farm house, 19th century kitchen, gardens, and historic archaeological artifacts

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The first Chevrolet Corvette was built in 1953, and though it has received numerous style updates since, its distinctive profile is instantly recognizable whenever it streaks by on the highway. The National Corvette Museum celebrates the history of this consummate American sports car, housing more than 70 specimens from each era of production. Upon entry, guests gravitate to the showroom's massive glass case, inside which a unique model spins on a turntable. Visitors can also sit in a current-era Corvette, leaning back for pictures and and purchasing chances to win one.

As they peruse the exhibits, enthusiasts will recognize one-of-a-kind concept vehicles and special editions, such as the 1983 Corvette, the only one in existience. Interactive exhibits abound, including the educational driving simulators used for teen driver seminars, and the pit crew challenge where you can electronically fuel up and change tires on a Corvette race car. The museum's location even plays a role in the Corvette story; across the street sits the GM Bowling Green Assembly Plant, the only place in the world the iconic sports car is manufactured.

350 Corvette Dr
Bowling Green,
KY
US

As dawn breaks over the campsite, soldiers begin stirring in their tents. Some tend to breakfasts over campfires while others see to the artillery. It's a scene straight from a Revolutionary War encampment—and that's exactly the way the reenactors intended it. Each year, roughly 275 of them flock to Locust Grove to camp out for two days, each of which ends with an artfully staged mock battle.

But when visitors come to the 18th Century Market Fair, they won't just find battle awaiting them. Top-notch craftsmen and artisans also roam the grounds, hawking replicas of 18th-century military and household items. "It's all very reminiscent of the type of market days they would have had during this time period," says Locust Grove's program director, Mary Beth Williams. Cooks dish up stews, pies, and cornbread alongside wine, ales, and apple cider. Nearby, families and historical buffs alike cheer on jugglers, watch as women prepare meals in the colonial kitchen, and listen to live music. And it's not just adults and time travelers creating the historical scene. "There's a lot of re-enactors of all ages," Mary Beth says. "I think it's particularly fun for kids to see other kids running around in period costume."

The fair's grounds lend to the historical accuracy. William and Lucy Clark Croghan built Locust Grove in 1790, on 55 acres of rolling land. To this day, their original Federal-style house remains, with its separate kitchen, icehouse, spring house, and barn. Over the years, Locust Grove was inhabited by Revolutionary War commander George Rogers Clark and served as a stopping point for Lewis and Clark as they walked across America as part of an early Nike ad campaign.

561 Blankenbaker Ln.
Louisville,
KY
US

In 1909, a group of local art enthusiasts banded together to foster a community appreciation for art and further the practice of creating art. More than three decades later, they moved from their home at the old Water Tower, and now fill their new space with workshops, classes, and exhibits. Louisville Visual Art Association remains dedicated to promoting local artists, artistic styles, and contemporary culture.

A team of instructors instills painting and sculpting skills in children of all ages with the Children's Fine Art Classes program, which lets kids hone their understanding of color and technique during nearly 40 classes and camps. They also teach adult art classes, and help economically and socially disadvantaged students exhibit their artwork through Open Doors. Six to eight annual exhibitions often showcase work from these programs, but may also display fabric and knit pieces from local artists, or house events such as custom plates, cups, and utensils fashioned by 16 national ceramics artists to recreate Salvador Dali’s themed dinner parties. Each year, staff also fill two galleries with up to 800 works from its children’s programs, and celebrate local restaurants and music at the annual Bacon Ball.

609 W. Main St.\
Louisville,
KY
US

On the First Friday of every month, the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft invites the community to peruse its wares for free. The museum, along with many of its neighbors on Louisville's Museum Row, participates in the First Friday Trolley Hop, a tour of the vibrant local art scene. It's one of many ways the museum team opens their 27,000 square feet of rotating art exhibits, which highlight styles from American folk art to taxidermy. The displays emphasize the importance of materials and process, rather than focusing exclusively on the final product. This philosophy extends to the museum's art workshops, in which kids make finger puppets, bracelets, and even mini-greenhouses well suited for pet hamsters who've always dreamed of gardening.

715 W Main St.
Louisville,
KY
US

You might think there's a lot of history to be discovered at Riverside; it was a thriving riverboat landing throughout most of the 1800s, after all. But there's even more history than that, as the site itself dates much further back in time. Long before the Greek Revival house was built by the Farnsley family and subsequently bought by the Moremens, the site was home to Native American cultures for thousands of years. Ongoing archaeological digs reveal both the history of the Farnsley and Moremen families who called this place home--as well as the pre-historic Native Americans who lived here before them. Today, visitors can take a tour through the millennia by dropping in on Civil War?era living in the reconstructed kitchen and experiencing even more ancient times by examining the stone tools and pottery discovered in ongoing archaeological excavations. The 1837 Greek Revival Farnsley-Moremen House stands at the center and stretches across 300 acres while showcasing spectacular scenic views of the Ohio River.

7410 Moorman Rd
Louisville,
KY
US

Though the creatures on display at Dinosaur World don’t need much space to roam, plenty of care has been taken to furnish them a comfortable habitat. They peer imposingly from the hillsides of Kentucky, crane their necks up through native trees, and stomp through prairie fields. Although a life-size mammoth or T. rex might be hard to miss, little visitors might still jump with delight at noticing a baby dino suddenly appear from behind a bush. Giant brachiosaurus necks arch high above treetops, while toothy meat-eaters and spiny stegosauruses roam the world below. The fiberglass, steel, and concrete models reach up to 80 feet in length, and are built according to the latest scientific discoveries about what dinosaurs looked like and what styles were trendy in the Mesozoic era.

The first Dinosaur World location was a former alligator farm in Florida and five years later another one was opened in Kentucky. As Swedish-born Christer Svensson began to fill it with statues, he consulted with experts around the world to not only create realistic reptiles but to surround them with fun, educational activities. Kids can sift through sand to find shark’s teeth, gastropod shells, and trilobites in a fossil dig, get to know some lizards a little better on the playground, or examine ancient eggs and raptor claws in the museum.

711 Mammoth Cave Rd
Cave City,
KY
US