Concerts in Papillion

Select Local Merchants

At Pizza Shoppe Collective, guests don’t just have to rely on their food to feel good. That’s because the restaurant features a second identity as a space for local artists and non-profits, fostering an artistic and communal feel that pervades the stage and connected restaurant. Before catching a show or event, clients can split one of the house’s signature pizzas loaded with ingredients that emulate the flavors of Cuban sandwiches, slathered barbeque, and classic Italian dishes. Outside of pizzas, the chefs incorporate a full menu of sizzling oven-toasted subs, traditional pastas, and an expansive wine and beer list that offers the perfect pairing or a very complex eye exam.

6056 Maple St
Omaha,
NE
US

Round-Abouts Restaurant's signature 3-inch Rounds—featuring a fluffy, homemade crust—conceal savory fillings such as cheese steak, roast beef, or pepperoni with pizza sauce ($2.25 each). Combo meals cater to hunger-pang decibel levels with a choice of up to three pies with a drink and a side of green salad, fruit salad, a cup of soup, or chips ($5.50–$8.25). For a more angular entree, sandwich fixings such as pulled pork and chicken salad nestle into fluffy ciabatta buns ($2 for half; $3.50 for whole). Sweet-teeth can delve into 1.5-inch yo-yo dessert pies, which pervade mouths and unlicked fingers with chocolate and fruit treats.

6891 A St
Lincoln,
NE
US

The Lincoln Symphony Orchestra treats guests to world-class symphonic music that delights the heart, soothes the soul, and opens a new musical passageway for human minds trapped in a single genre. The opening concert on September 17 is a boon to clarinet enthusiasts; it features principal piper Diane Barger offering her rendition of Scott McAllister’s X—Concerto for Clarinet —which is a tribute to the music of Generation X—as well as other pieces that include Mendelssohn’s Symphony no. 3, whose sonorous energy honors Scottish folk music and scotch. Prepare for another jolly season of jingling chestnuts and toasting bells by attending Deck the Halls, or welcome next year’s April rains with a trip to "Triumph and Romance," which features the violin sounds of Anton Miller as he plucks his chin guitar to the tune of Sibelius’s Violin Concerto in D Minor.

233 S 13th St
Lincoln,
NE
US

American playwright Mary Chase won a Pulitzer Prize in 1949 for Harvey, which follows the trials and travails of Elwood P. Dowd and his best friend—a six-foot invisible rabbit. Though Elwood is good-natured in spite of his odd companion, his sister Veta sees Harvey as a threat to her social standing and decides to commit her brother to an asylum. After a string of comedic mix-ups, Veta is forced to confront whether she wants to jeopardize Elwood’s life and happiness for her own personal gain. James Stewart was nominated for an Oscar for his portrayal of Elwood in the 1950 film adaptation of Harvey, which also starred the Trix Rabbit.

803 Q St
Lincoln,
NE
US

The Basement Dance & Yoga Studio celebrates bodies in motion, whether they are peacefully poised in a meditative yoga pose or joyfully abandoned in a hip-hop pop-and-lock. Instructor of hip-hop classes Janel Scott, a fourth-generation dance instructor with a pedigree that pirouettes back to Chicago's 1920s vaudeville scene, preaches an active learning style, focusing on sound fundamentals and promoting an energetic atmosphere. Adult Hip Hop 101 schools beat-bound bodies in the funky ways of popping, locking, gliding, waving, and Chi-town footwork, which originated in the tradition of using slick choreography to bribe an alderman into settling your parking ticket. The ladies-only Night Club Hip Hop coaches a jazz-funk hip-hop style reminiscent of the "Single Ladies" routine. Although some of the sass-infused routines will be learned in high heels, others can only be performed in diamond-studded rain boots.

2705 N Main St
Elkhorn,
NE
US

When the Joslyn Art Museum opened in 1931, more than 25,000 people lined up to see the exhibits. It had taken three years of construction and $3 million to create the splendid art-deco building, which was inlaid with more than 38 types of marble imported from around the world. The force behind this enormous effort was philanthropist Sarah Joslyn, who had the building built in honor of her late husband. But instead of standing front and center, Sarah quietly mixed in with the crowd. "I am just one of the public," she said to people who recognized her.

Sarah truly viewed the museum as a gift to the people of Omaha. And for more than 80 years, they've cared for it like one. With the 58,000-square-foot addition addition of the Walter & Suzanne Scott Pavilion, a sculpture garden, and other enhancements, the museum has grown with time. Visitors today find more than 11,000 works of art inside, with collections and exhibitions that include pieces of ancient Greek pottery, Renaissance and Baroque paintings by Titian and El Greco, and Impressionist works by Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Claude Monet.

After admiring the peasant portraiture of 19th-century French realist Jules Breton, guests can cartwheel over to a collection of 18th- and 19th-century American artwork, which includes portraits by James Peale and landscape images by Thomas Cole. Pieces from the 20th century from artists such as Grant Wood transition visitors into viewings of more contemporary works or attempts to find a 3-D Magic Eye picture in Jackson Pollock's Galaxy.

2200 Dodge St
Omaha,
NE
US