Sightseeing in Papillion

Select Local Merchants

When Joslyn Art Museum opened in 1931, more than 25,000 people lined up to see the exhibits. It had taken three years of construction and $3 million to create the splendid art-deco building, which was inlaid with more than 38 types of marble imported from around the world. The force behind this enormous effort was philanthropist Sarah Joslyn, who had the building built in honor of her late husband. But instead of standing front and center, Sarah quietly mixed in with the crowd. "I am just one of the public," she said to people who recognized her.

Sarah truly viewed the museum as a gift to the people of Omaha. With the 58,000-square-foot addition of the Walter & Suzanne Scott Pavilion, a sculpture garden, and other enhancements, the museum has grown with time. Visitors today find more than 11,000 works of art inside, with collections and exhibitions that include pieces of ancient Greek pottery, Renaissance and Baroque paintings by Titian and El Greco, and Impressionist works by Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Claude Monet.

After admiring the peasant portraiture of 19th-century French realist Jules Breton, guests can cartwheel over to a collection of 18th- and 19th-century American artwork, which includes portraits by James Peale and landscape images by Thomas Cole. Pieces from the 20th century from artists such as Grant Wood transition visitors into viewings of more contemporary works or attempts to find a 3-D Magic Eye picture in Jackson Pollock's Galaxy.

2200 Dodge St
Omaha,
NE
US

When you enter one of the Douglas County Historical Society's buildings, don't be surprised if your skin turns sepia, because stepping inside is like stepping back in time. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization strives to collect, preserve, and share with the public all aspects of Douglas County history, including over six million paper-based artifacts in the Library Archives Center. Amongst the non-paper attractions is the General Crook House Museum: the authentically-restored 1879 home of General George Crook, features Victorian furnishings and heirloom gardens. Just north of the Crook House is the Library Archives Center, which is open to the public, and includes documents, newspapers, photographs, artifacts, and maps relating to the history of Douglas County and Omaha.

5730 N 30th St
Omaha,
NE
US

Thirty-seven years before taking over The Tonight Show from Jack Paar, Johnny Carson was born in a humble one-story home in Corning, Iowa, the county seat of the least populated county in Iowa, on October 23, 1925. After studying radio and speech at the University of Nebraska, he honed his comedic chops writing for Red Skelton before forever reshaping late-night television. The recipient of numerous awards, including a Peabody and Presidential Medal of Freedom, and named the Greatest TV Icon by Entertainment Weekly and TV Land, Johnny remained on The Tonight Show until 1992, when his final episode drew in nearly 50 million viewers. Highlights from his Tonight Show tenure play on a TV inside his family's restored home, where visitors can explore the various rooms of Johnny's childhood.

500 13th St.
Corning,
IA
US

In the days before kegs and bottles, beer enthusiasts would have to cart a bucket to their local brewery, fill it up, and carry it (gently) home. Lucky Bucket Brewing Company pays tribute to brewing history both in its name and its traditional brewing techniques.

Lucky Bucket’s flavorsome creations are crafted inside an 18,000-square-foot brew house. Gleaming silver tankards give birth to bottles of a pre-Prohibition-style lager, a pleasantly floral IPA, and the dark, malty imperial porter Certified Evil.

The facility operates a craft brewery, as well as Nebraska's only craft distillery, which turns out hand-crafted spirits such as Cut Spike Single-Malt Whiskey and Cut Spike Premium Vodka. The distillery ages it's whiskey for two years in brand new American oak barrels.

11941 Centennial Road
La Vista,
NE
US

Named for the terroir in which its grapes flourish, Glacial Till Vineyard's rocky mineral-rich soil is home to nine varieties of French-American red and white grapes that grow ripe on the vine across gently sloping hills. Those grapes are crushed, pressed, and eventually transformed into handcrafted wines, including a smooth and dry Chambourcin; the semisweet and fruity Edelweiss; and the bright, springy Frontenac Rose. At the beautiful off-site tasting room, visitors can take a seat at a caf? table or along the bar to enjoy sips of all of Glacial Till's wines, which can also be ordered by the glass or bottle.

1419 Silver St
Ashland,
NE
US

Twelve years ago, Frank and Amy Faust bought a 6-acre plot of land in the Loess Hills countryside with the intention of building themselves a log cabin. Instead, they found themselves sidetracked by a new dream—starting a winery. At Sugar Clay Winery, the Fausts now produce up to 10,000 gallons of wine each year, yet, as they told KETV-7, they still take the time to cork each bottle by hand. Visitors can introduce themselves to 14 of Sugar Clay’s proprietary varietals in the tasting room, such as the sangria-esque Loess Hills blush or a four-grape ambrosia blanc whose flavors morph from apple to butterscotch and almond with each sip. Outside, shaded decks house guests peering out on views of sloping valleys soundtracked by a chorus of birds hiding among the surrounding cedars. A fire pit warms sippers during crisper nights or on afternoons when a tour group of refrigerators shows up, and live musicians fill the air with notes from dulcimers and acoustic guitars.

1446 240th Ave
Thurman,
IA
US