Symphony in Pennsylvania


Select Local Merchants

Hershey Theatre The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.
Chestnut St. and Columbus Blvd.
Philadelphia,
PA
US
Guests take their seats inside the grandiose Carnegie Music Hall, a space lauded for providing superb acoustics for chamber music and a challenging venue for games of Marco Polo. The venue is tucked inside the same building as the dinosaur bones and European masterworks of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the Carnegie Museum of Art.
4400 Forbes Ave.
Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania
US
Since 1913, the Erie Philharmonic has been on a melody-driven mission to enrich its surrounding communities with live concerts and stirring performances. Tchaikovsky's symphony begins by spotlighting one of America's most successful composers, Christopher Theofanidis, as he conducts "Rainbow Body," an evocative movement inspired by medieval mystic Hildegard of Bingen and her propensity to lead chants at high-school football games. Next, guitarist Ana Vidovic continues her drag race to the top of the classical genre by cramming the swaying, syncopated rhythms of a Spanish concerto into open ears. Pathétique closes the evening with a spirited rendition of Tchaikovsky's final symphonic piece. Fueled by the juxtaposition of varying emotions, Pathétique tows listeners to the top of triumphant crests, only to yank them back into the darkened valleys of personal upheaval and frustration over uncertain weather forecasts.
811 State Street
Erie,
PA
US
The 98-year-old Reading Symphony Orchestra will be led by guest conductor Bradley Thachuk, who’ll direct the sonic traffic through an engaging pops concert. With this deal, you’ll listen to a charming collection of romantic tunes—the symphony lovingly performs such enchanting melodies so that hopeful husbands will be able to call off Cupid’s laser-guided arrow attack. Indulge the ears with the mellifluous melodies and sonorous tunes produced live by a mélange of cellos, violas, violins, oboes, and percussion instruments. This deal gets you a seat in the mid-balcony section, where one can see the entire orchestra as well as all the dazzling hairdos of the lower deck.
147 N 5th St
Reading,
PA
US
Hershey Theatre The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.
77 Sands Blvd.
Bethlehem,
PA
US
Concertante spreads the up-close thrill of chamber music throughout the country with accessible arrangements of classic and modern works. As listeners settle into the Rose Lehrmen Arts Center's intimate concert space with no seat farther than 45 feet from the stage, the program kicks off with Czech composer Erwin Schulhoff's String Sextet, lacing modernist moves with rapidly changing rhythms and off-kilter melodies inflected at various points by jazz and dance modes. A spooky andante makes listeners check for under-seat monsters before spidery pizzicato punctuates a return to up-tempo fireworks. Commissioned by Concertante, Gabriela Lena Frank's Hypnagogia for String Sextet re-regulates pulses as it evokes the experience of falling asleep with an aural atmosphere noted by the New York Times for its "laconic, easy-to-follow simplicity."
1 Hacc Drive
Harrisburg,
PA
US
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