Movies in East Falls

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The second annual Philly F/M Festival culls hordes of independent films and live music, emphasizing the interplay of the two media. Thursday night hosts the event's kick-off party as Philadelphia Slick douses the crowd with waves of toe-tapping beats and games of Simon Says. The neighborhood's lights dim on Friday as the film screenings begin at 7 p.m. with Sound It Out, a phonetically precise documentary that chronicles the last vinyl record shop in Teesside, England. Meet Me on South Street, The Story of JC Dobbs (September 24 at 6:30 p.m.) delves into Philadelphia's artistic subculture and underground crocheting scene from the 1970s to 1996 through the lens of one of its signature and now defunct musical establishments.

1600 N 5th St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

When Samuel Vaughan Merrick and William H. Keating brought The Franklin Institute to life in 1824, it was to honor the life and achievements of Renaissance man Benjamin Franklin. In the decades since, the Institute has hosted further forward thinkers such as Nikola Tesla, who demonstrated wireless telegraphy in 1893, and helped advance science and technology, hosting the first public demo of an all-electronic TV system in 1934.

  • Size: three floors give voice to human ingenuity?past and future?with hundreds of interactive exhibits
  • Eye Catcher: the two-story-tall, 5,000-square-foot Giant Heart, which teaches children about cardiovascular health while they crawl through its chambers
  • Permanent Mainstay: Fels Planetarium, the second oldest planetarium in the nation, complete with a rooftop observatory and a 60-foot seamless aluminum dome
  • Hands-On Experiments: construct an interplanetary rover in the Space Command, complete an electrical circuit with your body, and launch a cannonball in Circus! Science Under the Big Top
  • Honor the Man: swing by the 20-foot-tall, 30-ton marble statue of Benjamin Franklin in the rotunda to see what the genius looked like and thank him for your bifocals
  • Don't Miss: the Maillardet Automaton, a boy-like drawing machine that inspired the film Hugo
222 North 20th St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Run by Anna Maria Florio, the daughter of Italian immigrants, La Cucina at the Market imparts vital culinary arts to its students in intimate, informative classes. Students plunge their hands into the world of handmade pasta in Making Handmade Pasta: Easy as 1, 2, 3, which runs through the art and science of noodle and sauce. In classes of up to 15 people, pupils knead, roll, and slice pasta dough to infuse homemade Italian entrees with a personal touch. Nascent noodle artists acquire the art of lengthy fettuccine and broad pappardelle, and afterward pastacrafters will be able to construct an edible sculpture of a penguin in formalwear using bowtie-mimicking farfalle.

51 N 12th St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

An elegant fusion of Old-World, small-town charm and state-of-the-art technology, Reel Cinemas theaters allow moviegoers to see box-office hits from the comfort of renovated, stadium-style seats. Many of its screens live in updated and renovated old-school theaters, giving the viewing experience a dash of class. The digital projection and sound are decidedly modern, as is a 3D system that makes films more lifelike than the sweating statues of a balmy wax museum. Moviegoers can stop by locations in Narbeth, Bala Cynwyd, and Wayne.

129 N Narberth Ave
Narberth,
PA
US

Written by Richard Greenberg, Take Me Out centers on Darren Lemmings, an arrogant superstar on the New York Empires whose coming out of the closet irrevocably alters the national pastime. Amid the anger of deeply racist and homophobic teammate Shane Mungitt, the admiration of gay financial manager Mason Marzac, and the reactions of other players in the locker room, the only person who seems unaffected by the revelation is Darren himself. Watch the drama swirl around the ego-ridden protagonist both on and off the field, but always on the stage, at the Plays & Players performance of your choice.

1714 Delancey St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

9D Cinema might sound like a movie theater, but its 6- to 14-minute shows are as much of a ride as they are a movie. Patrons recline in active-motion seats that tilt and shift to match each movie's events, creating a viewing experience more immersive than just moving your legs up and down while an action hero runs onscreen. While the seats swivel about, special effects stimulate film-appropriate weather. The theatre might turn snowy and windy for a film such as Polar Region Hurricane; on the other hand, during a spooky film such as Ghost House, it might be illuminated by a carefully timed lightning bolt.

901 Market St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US