Galleries in Southwest Philadelphia

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Sound Excursions describes their carefully curated group experiences as "field trips for adults." It's easy to see why: every outing takes groups to a new realm of Washington, whether it's the frothy shores of Puget Sound, inland forests and mountains, or tables at Seattle's thriving restaurants. The events held at these diverse locations range from culinary workshops on topics such as sushi-making and moonshine-tasting, to adventurous excursions with whitewater rafting or kayaking, to laid-back themed party cruises. For many outings, luxury transportation is provided.

404 South 20th Street
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Philadelphia Theatre Company is a dramatic laboratory for new stage works. Since its founding in 1974, the company has premiered more than 140 original plays and musicals, with more than half moving on to New York and other major cities. Widely lauded by local outlets and frequently recognized with Barrymore Awards, the company would need to build a new black box theater to contain its accolades.

480 S Broad St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

The Philadelphia Museum of Art houses more than 225,000 objects spanning a jaw-whopping 5,000 years of human history. An extensive permanent collection of both Eastern and Western art includes highlights such as Temple Hall, a full-size, immaculately carved sixteenth-century Hindu temple. Grapple with the challenges of modernity amid the display of twentieth-century New York Dada art, featuring several pieces constructed entirely out of apple-satellite-violet-blargh. Chandelier and chandelier-swinging enthusiasts will enjoy Hanging Around: Modern and Contemporary Lighting from the Permanent Collection, which explores how electricity turned function into fashion (the exhibit ends October 10).

2600 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Sensory overload doesn?t begin to describe Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens. A seemingly boundless compilation of colors, textures, and shapes, the labyrinthine mosaic creation spans 3,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space. The masterpiece originated in the brain of Isaiah Zagar, a Philadelphia native who grew up in New York. During his third year of art school, he stumbled upon Clarence Schmidt?s folk-art-inspired installations?assemblages of found objects and recycled materials?and the young artist?s view of the art world changed. ?I didn't know that I was looking at art,? Zagar reflects in his mission statement. Self-admittedly, Zagar has been somewhat ?copying? Schmidt?s dynamic, free-flowing style ever since.

The years after art school brought Zagar an onslaught of new opportunities. He spent time as an artist in China and India, joined the Peace Corps with his wife Julia, settled in Peru for three years, and even tried his hand at ceramics in Wisconsin. In the ?60s, he and Julia returned to his birthplace?specifically, the waning South Street neighborhood. Isaiah quickly leapt into action, renovating dilapidated buildings and often adding mosaics to formerly barren walls. Eventually, Isaiah?s imagination outgrew their projects, and in 1994 he began constructing a new piece in a vacant lot near his studio?the project would become Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens.

Isaiah spent 14 precious years, which he should have applied to Y2K preparations, scooping out tunnels, erecting multitiered walls, and splashing the entire space in colorful tile. The finished product stretches across half a block of South Street; the outside enclosure shimmering with vibrant tiles, the inside housing folk art, colored glass bottles, and countless sparkling mirrors. Now a nonprofit organization, Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens invites visitors to enjoy its visual candy with guided or self-guided tours.

1020 South St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Owner Nancy Nagle stocks a colorful rainbow of knitting supplies in her bright and eccentric gallery, which has become a go-to outlet for the local knitting community. To meet the demand, she constantly stuffs her shelves with new styles of material, ranging from traditional yarns to luxury fibers—banana, recycled silk, and Wookiee fur—to carry-along yarns with sequins, flags, and lash. Nagle’s passion for fiber arts has introduced her to a community of artists who dye and spin some of her more than 20 brands of yarn. She uses the shop as a gallery to display the work of these local artists—including Philadelphia native John Stango—as well as share her own bold collection of woven work such as hats, shawls, and sweaters.

City Paper's A.D. Amorosi describes the two-floor Nangellini as a "doubly colorful" space as "bright and open as a bay window in Sag Harbor." Amorosi admires the gallery's art collection, and between the vibrant space's "faux-tin ceiling" and "matronly rugs," Nancy leads open and privately scheduled classes on knitting, crochet, and lace work. Classes cover all the basic techniques required for newcomers to begin creating their own woven pieces, such as scarves and felt toupees.

832 South St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) celebrates art from America's entire history. Its galleries take visitors on a chronological trip through the country's ever-changing aesthetic landscape, with special attention paid to sculptures, paintings, and paper works. Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts also trains the next generation of artists, with full-time degree programs at the bachelor and masters levels.

  • Size: two buildings?The Historic Landmark Building and the contemporary Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building
  • Eye Catcher: Gilbert Stuart?s 1796 painting George Washington (The Lansdowne Portrait)
  • Permanent Mainstay: Gallery 128, which showcases a rotating collection of works from current students, alumni, and faculty
  • Visiting Exhibit: Spiritual Strivings: A Celebration of African American Works on Paper, which encompasses more than 90 works (through October 12, 2014)
  • Don't Miss: Highway?George Tooker's 1953 painting depicting the challenges of living in New York City
  • Pro Tip: artists can bring a sketchbook (pencil only) into the the Historic Landmark Building, provided it doesn't exceed 12? x 16? or erupt with trumpet fanfares when opened
  • Special Programs: art-history lectures, evening gallery events, and continuing-education programs in drawing, painting, sculpture, and other mediums
118 N Broad St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US