Sightseeing in Phoenix


One-Day Visit with Print for One or Two at Amazing Arizona Comic Con (Up to 67% Off). Five Options Available.

Amazing Arizona Comic Con

Phoenix Convention Center, in Halls F&G

Meet the comic creators behind series like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Teen Titans, and Death of Wolverine

$49.99 $17

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Two or Four Tickets to the Pueblo Grande Auxiliary Indian Market and Ki:him on December 13 or 14 (Up to 50% Off)

Pueblo Grande Museum

Indian Market

Over 100 artist booths offer food, activities, & performances by dancers & musicians—”Ki:him” is an interactive set of artist demonstrations

$16 $10

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One-Day Hot Air Balloon Festival for Two or Four from Arizona Balloon Classic on January 23–25, 2015 (47% Off)

Arizona Balloon Classic

Phoenix

Guests experience all aspects of hot air balloon culture during festival with morning races, tethered rides, fireworks, and exhibits

$30 $16

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$178 for a Hot-Air-Balloon Ride with Breakfast and Drinks from Arizona Hot Air Balloon Rides ($325 Value)

Arizona Hot Air Balloon Rides

Phoenix

Fly over the Sonoran Desert at sunrise, then enjoy a gourmet breakfast with mimosas

$325 $178

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Museum Visit for Four, Six, or Eight at Arizona Pop Culture Experience (Up to 55% Off)

Arizona Pop Culture Experience

Phoenix

Museum with more than 13,000 action figures, comic books, and pieces of memorabilia covers the last 50 to 60 years of pop culture

$20 $10

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$16 for Admission for Up to Four People to the The Hall of Flame Fire Museum (Up to $28 Value)

The Hall of Flame Fire Museum

Phoenix

Nearly an acre of exhibits trace international firefighting history, from old-fashioned fire engines to helmets from around the world

$28 $16

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Select Local Merchants

Comfortably nestled in the shadows of the San Tan Mountains, owner Perry Rea and his family coax silken oils out of the olives they grow in their own groves. After more than 10 years of experiments, they finally settled on planting a few more than 16 distinct varietals, which thrive in the otherwise unforgiving Arizona deserts. Extending thoughtful care to each harvest, they avoid using any pesticides or genetically modified trees, employ water-conserving drip irrigation, and hand-pluck their olives at the peak of ripeness. Within 24 hours of picking, the staff then presses the crop in order to extract oils that taste as fresh as honey taken directly from a bee's pantry. The fresh oils line the shelves of the mill's marketplace alongside imported wines and locally made goods. In addition to gourmet food items, the store stocks an extensive collection of Italian ceramics, works by local painters, and bath-and-body products infused with extra-virgin olive oil. Queen Creek Olive Mill's oils also appear on the menu of del Piero, the facility's Tuscan-inspired bistro. Based on the Rea family's own recipes, each entree incorporates organic ingredients whenever possible, including locally sourced meats and herbs from the organic garden.
7122 East Greenway Parkway
Scottsdale,
AZ
US
Step beneath the domed, packed-mud ceiling of a traditional Navajo family dwelling. Weave a Yavapi burden basket. Explore a secluded garden filled with bronze sculptures of women in prayer. By immersing visitors in Native American artifacts and artworks, the Heard Museum's exhibits strive to illuminate the cultural legacy of Arizona’s indigenous peoples. The collections emphasize first-person accounts of Native cultures, not only through artwork, but also in interviews with Native Americans, portraits by Navajo photographers, and monthly lectures. In addition to showcasing historical artifacts, the Heard Museum exhibits contemporary American Indian artwork. Like a ballerina trapped on a carousel, exhibits rotate often, and have included collections of Native American bolo ties, Hopi pottery, and 20th-century paintings depicting Native ceremony. Passing on cultural traditions to future generations, the staff educates children with tours, and brings Native American presentations and curricula to area schools.
2301 North Central Avenue
Phoenix,
AZ
US
When Neil Armstrong landed on the moon, reports The Arizona Republic, it sparked John Edwards' passion for Star Trek. He began amassing action figures and memorabilia into a collection that has since mushroomed into the more than 13,000 toys, comic books, and posters that put the experience into the Arizona Pop Culture Experience. According to the Phoenix New Times, the nonprofit museum is divided into rooms based on heroes and stories, such as the DC room and the Marvel room. Hundreds of action figures, custom-made for John, have earned the museum top honors in the _ Phoenix New Times’_ 2010 “Best Places to See Action Figures”, and the only spot on The Action Figure Makers’ Guild Magazine’s list, “Where are All my Action Figures?” The rest of the space covers the last 50 to 60 years of popular culture, from Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and the music of The Doors to current crazes such as Twilight and Harry Potter, the saga of a wizard who relinquishes his wand to make earthenware. The museum also doubles as a comic book store where new issues hit the shelves every week.
4550-176 E. Cactus Rd.
Phoenix,
AZ
US
The Penske Racing Museum houses the largest of winning Indy cars other than the Brickyard’s museum in Indianapolis. In the museum are displayed winning race cars and Penske racing memorabilia. Make a day of your visit to the museum. Enjoy breakfast or lunch in the Turn4 Café on the second floor. With more than 300 major race wins including 15 Indianapolis 500-mile race victories, there is much to see including the 1963 Pontiac Catalina driven by Roger Penske to victory in the 1963 Riverside 250. Before you leave the museum, check out the Boutique, on the second floor, where you can purchase Penske Racing merchandise such as apparel, die cast cars, books – even unique car parts signed by Penske Team drivers. The Penske Racing Museum is open seven days a week. Admission is free.
7125 E Chauncey Ln
Phoenix,
AZ
US
If you listen carefully on the grounds of Pioneer Arizona Living History Museum, the air holds whispers from the past that come to life through the mouths of costumed interpreters from the late 19th century. The 90-acre town is rife with both authentic buildings and accurate reproductions that host guest adventurers and Western-style dramas several times a week. Visitors mosey through a blacksmith shop and an 1890s-era dress shop. There's even a sheriff's office complete with jail for old-timey scofflaws who committed crimes of the day, like horse theft or saloon theft. Fixtures of Arizona history feature throughout the village, from a cabin that survived the state's bloodiest range war to the opera house where famed chanteuse Lilly Langtry sang. Regular events in the village include sheriff and bandit shows, Civil War reenactments, and gun fight reenactments that replicate historic "BANG" signs popping out from the muzzle of a rifle.
3901 W Pioneer Rd
Phoenix,
AZ
US
The Hall of Flame Fire Museum showcases the history of firefighting with nearly an acre's worth of exhibits and restored pieces of firefighting equipment that date as far back as 1725. Visitors can check out a Rhode Island fire engine from 1844 that was capable of pumping 250 gallons of water per minute to put out fires or 250 gallons of sarsaparilla per minute to fuel citywide block parties. The Hall's 400 fire helmet collection presents 400 protective headpieces from around the world, and in the museum's sixth gallery, the National Firefighting Hall of Heroes honors firefighters who were decorated for heroism and those who have died in the line of duty.
6101 E Van Buren St
Phoenix,
AZ
US