Korean Restaurants in Pinehurst

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Most American chefs never even flirt with the ingredients Cho Won Garden’s chefs rely on heavily, from the garnish radish kimchi to their popular Bulgogi dish, which consists of sliced, boneless prime beef. They also serve meat, rice, and vegetable medleys in traditional stone pots—the very vessels in which the earliest cooks in human history learned how to boil down rocks into pebbles.

2501 Crownpoint Executive Dr
Charlotte,
NC
US

Simple, understated decor and dim lighting make Kenko Korean Cuisine and Sushi a serene place to dine. After settling into a high-backed chair or wood-cut booth, diners can take a gander at the extensive menu, which features classic Japanese dishes such as udon noodles and chicken katsu alongside Korean specialties. Behind the sushi bar, chefs whip up rolled specialties packed with fresh fish and colorful veggies.

101 Keybridge Drive
Morrisville,
NC
US

Maru's distinct pan-Asian cuisine blends Japanese and Korean cuisine into tapas-style dining and elaborate sushi rolls. Amid deep crimson walls and rich mahogany woods, diners tuck into Korean short ribs or marinated bulgogi?thin-sliced rib-eye steak?as chopsticks conduct Japanese flavor symphonies of miso-marinated pork belly and char-broiled squid drizzled in sweet ginger sauce. Omakase-style dining gives culinary adventurers a chance to tour the chef's favorite new creations, sampling their way through an off-menu spread of sushi. Alternatively, guests can delight in the bistro's complex sushi mainstays, such as the Maru roll, stuffed with crab and cream cheese, topped with spicy tuna, and christened with crispy spires of sliced lotus root. The sushi bar also slices its own tapas dishes, slinging shareable plates of yellowtail with organic microgreens, jalapeño, and ponzu, or cuts of spicy tuna and avocado served on lotus-root chips.

6404 Tryon Rd
Cary,
NC
US

Once guests walk through Hayashi-Ya’s Japanese--style front gate, they become part of the Hayashi family—and that means feeling at home. To ensure this, the founder decorates his restaurant to recall a small Japanese village festooned with pink flower vines, wooden handrails, and polished-wood wall panels. Exposed brick offsets paper lanterns, which are stenciled with black Japanese script and glow as if flooded by honey. To enhance these decorative flourishes and the staff’s warm greetings of “I-ra-sai-ma-se!” (“welcome”), the eatery whips up a diverse menu of fresh-cut sashimi, sushi, and traditional Japanese dishes. Servers lead guests down red carpets to low-slung cushioned seats, where authentic floor dining pairs with raw and cooked fish—all flown in daily and prepared by master sushi chefs from Japan, Korea, and Atlantis. As the meal progresses, black lacquered tables populate with udon noodles dishes, teriyaki, and hibachi fare as speakers pulse with traditional Japanese music. To complement the menu, Hayashi-Ya also stocks a full bar with beers and wines, Japanese sake, and martinis.

8401 Brier Creek Pkwy
Raleigh,
NC
US

Buku takes its name from the international slang for “merci beaucoup”—the French phrase for "thank you very much.” The restaurant's global awareness extends beyond its name to a menu inspired by traditional street food all over the world. Chefs take their cues from culinary traditions from everywhere from Poland to Korea, creating gourmet dishes with authentic international flavors.

Regardless of its cultural influence, each meal is prepared using eco-conscious ingredients such as hormone-free beef, sustainable market seafood, and certified-organic coffee raised on a diet of smaller, even more organic coffee beans. Diners can wash down their meals with their choice from an equally international menu of wines and craft beers, along with a selection of cocktails and sake.

110 E Davie St
Raleigh,
NC
US

Asuka's delightfully diverse menu rolls out sushi classics alongside juicy steaks, hearty pastas, and tender seafood brimming with Asian flavors. Dig into panko-breaded don katsu—chicken or pork cutlets deep-fried to juicy crispness ($15)—or put a pile of chopsticks on the table and play pick-up sticks to determine who gets the first slice of a dragon roll ($11.95) or a rainbow roll ($9.95). The garlic teriyaki tuna ($17.95) keeps senses floating on seaside flavor clouds, and the bulgogi don buoys a convoy of potato noodles, thin beef slices, mushrooms, and veggies in a sweet soy broth ($16).

2010 S Main St
Wake Forest,
NC
US