Charity & Grassroots in Goose Hollow

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Founded in 1898, a year remembered by fashion historians as "the year of President McKinley Eyebrows," the Oregon Historical Society has sought to preserve and promote the history, politics, and culture of the nation's 33rd state through publications, lectures, and the exhibits at the Oregon History Museum. Befriend the past with the Oregon My Oregon exhibit, an award-winning and interactive look at the state's odyssey. It features 7,000 square feet of more than 50 displays showcasing numerous artifacts and antiques, including a 9,000-year-old sagebrush sandal. Beat the Independence Day rush with a visit to the exhibit Tall in the Saddle: 100 Years of the Pendleton Round-Up, running through July 4. The exhibit celebrates a century of the iconic bronco-busting rodeo event with video clips, authentic Round-up gear, and timeless photography. Also appearing at the Oregon History Museum is Becoming American: Teenagers & Immigration, a Smithsonian traveling exhibit with photos chronicling the experiences of first-generation immigrants and their children and how they have adjusted to the land of apple pie and processed-cheese singles. The exhibit runs through May 30.

1200 SW Park Ave
Portland,
OR
US

This summer, 123 young people and adults from diverse backgrounds—including sexual-assault survivors, adults living in low-income housing, women in drug and alcohol recovery, boys in youth detention—participated in Write Around Portland's free eight-week writing workshops. The workshops culminate in a book-release party and community reading scheduled for August 26, when 50 participants will read from the anthology and share their work with the community.

917 SW Oak St
Portland,
OR
US

Following the rally, students will engage in a variety of activities designed to support students at Roosevelt in their pursuit of higher education and teach the university students about leadership through service. Service projects will beautify the community with landscaping, cleaning, collecting oral histories, and organizing library resources. Participants will also encourage students with a College is Possible campaign, assembling care packages for the school’s alumni who are currently in college and creating college tip sheets. Oregon Campus Compact needs additional funding to host meetings where students will coordinate the events and supplies for the events, including power washers, paint, rags, and snacks for volunteers.

620 Southwest 5th Avenue
Portland,
OR
US

Because joining the organ, eye, and tissue donor registry is an important decision, Donate Life Northwest actively engages and informs youths through its website and online video game, Scalpel Pal. The organization also conducts educational sessions at high schools to aid students with facts and information regarding organ donation and transplantation and the positive impact they can have. As of March 1, 2010, more than 2.1 million Oregonians were registered as organ, eye, and tissue donors, due in part to the efforts of Donate Life Northwest.

2525 SW 1st Ave
Portland,
OR
US

Sisters Of The Road was born in 1979, when an anonymous person used chalk to draw a circle containing three Xs—the hobo symbol for good food and hospitality—on the sidewalk in front of the organization's new restaurant in the Old Town/Chinatown neighborhood. The founders paid for the space with $10 and bartered for the rent.

Today, visitors who can't afford the typical $1.25 price tag for a meal at the café also can barter work in exchange for their food—much of which is donated by local grocery stores. First-time customers and those who cannot pay or work for their meals get their food for free. Last year, the café served more than 39,000 meals, 3,500 of which were given gratis to families, people with disabilities, and first-time customers. Others worked a total of more than 10,000 hours to pay for their tabs. In addition to operating the restaurant, Sisters Of The Road has published a book and video on homelessness and sponsored an annual conference on economic human rights and nonviolence.

133 NW 6th Ave
Portland,
OR
US

The Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA) aims to make bicycling safe and convenient through advocacy, encouragement, and bicycle-riding education. By supporting bike transportation, the organization aims to improve the physical health and environmental sustainability of communities. BTA’s trained safety ambassadors teach bicycle-safety lessons to 5,000 students annually in 60 elementary schools across the state. During its safety program, three sessions focus on in-class learning and seven propel students onto bikes, starting on the playground and gradually moving out onto the street. A community ride follows the course, where volunteers and parents ride from the school to a local park. Students who have studied in the course each receive their own helmet to ensure they are equipped to ride safely.

618 Northwest Glisan Street
Portland,
OR
US