Zoo in Prescott

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Heritage Park and its volunteers are dedicated to the conservation and protection of wildlife, caring for more than 150 indigenous and exotic mammals, reptiles, and birds in a 10-acre haven. Many of Heritage Park's animals were previously injured, abandoned, or marked with a human imprint that prevents them from rejoining their packs without bringing personalized coffee mugs for everyone. While prowling through the sanctuary, visitors might spy a mountain lion that was kept as a pet, a black bear that was orphaned by his mother, or a fox rescued from a swimming pool. Emus, tarantulas, and ring-tailed lemurs also run free in their habitats, serenading onlookers with their wild cries.

Heritage Park also plays an important role in the Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan, granting asylum to critically endangered Mexican gray wolves, which are being reintroduced into the wild after a 20-year absence. The zoological sanctuary is open every day, with extended hours from May 1 to October 31 to give guests a chance to see animals that are usually out running errands during business hours.

1403 Heritage Park Rd
Prescott,
AZ
US

My Petting Zoo LLC offers children and adults alike the chance to interact with a variety of gentle animals. Miniature goats, a mini horse, and a pony named Riley cavort among rabbits, chickens, ducks, and potbellied pigs. Customers are welcome to visit the animals at a farm, or request a mobile visit that brings the animals to parties, events, schools, or homes.

6414 E Calle De Las Estrellas
Cave Creek,
AZ
US

The giraffe smells a food pellet. He pokes his head just over the railing and starts sniffing for the guest holding his treat. Not far off, some brightly plumed parrots land on another visitor?s arm, spying the tasty apple slices in her hand. Though you can?t get this close to every animal at Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium?such as the lions and the wild Larry Fitzgeralds?the keepers do facilitate animal-human exchanges as often as possible with the zoo?s more than 600 species. They also give visitors novel views of some exhibits by welcoming them aboard the Skyride, the Australian boat ride, and the African train safari. The adjacent aquarium adds to the zoo?s impressive animal collection, housing more than 75 exhibits and enough water to start a new earth colony.

Further attractions include a children?s petting zoo, daily shows, and a baby-animal nursery. At the 15-acre Safari Park, guests stroll or ride the tram through animal habitats, where they can spy on species that live on the other side of the equator. Wildlife World also features two restaurants where guests can feed themselves and their own helpless progeny.

16501 W Northern Ave.
Litchfield Park,
AZ
US

The dream of philanthropists Robert and Nancy Maytag became reality in 1962, and today, the Phoenix Zoo has welcomed more than 43 million guests onto its 125 acre oasis in the Papago Park neighborhood. It’s easy to spend an entire day here, strolling the 2.5 miles of walking trails or taking the tram, meeting and greeting more than 1,400 animals residing in state-of-the-art, humane habitats designed to mimic life in the wild. Some 30 species are endangered or threatened, including creatures being brought back to sustainable numbers like the Arabian Oryx, Black-footed ferrets, Chiricahua leopard frogs, narrow-headed garter snake, thick-billed parrots and Mexican wolves. Many critters enjoy the sunshine hours, but to best see the nocturnal natives, visitors will want to sign up for Twilight or Night Camp flashlight tours.

455 N Galvin Pkwy
Phoenix,
AZ
US

Hundreds of animals from around the world roam the spacious, natural habitats on Out of Africa Wildlife Park?s 104 acres. Tours of the Wildlife Preserve jaunt past gray wolves and spotted hyenas, while a 30-minute African Bush Safari travels through a 22-acre high-desert-plains habitat where lions and tigers roam the hillside. Caretakers, colorful toys, and brain-tickling games of chess entertain Bengal and Siberian tigers in the Tiger Splash?s 35'x50' pool. Guests eager to interact with the park?s critters can hold anacondas and boas at the Giant Snake Show or tag along with caretakers feeding lions and tigers with 800 pounds of raw food. Check out Out of Africa Wildlife Park's YouTube or Twitter page for more information.

3505 W SR-260
Camp Verde,
AZ
US

Pluto. The solar system's most mysterious planetary body owes its discovery to the Lowell Observatory. It was here, in 1902, that Percival Lowell first suspected the possible existence of the cold, lonely body. However, Pluto isn't the only feather in the observatory's astronomical cap. Lowell astronomers also noted the the first evidence of the expanding universe, and measured the motions and properties of distant stars. In the 21st century, a staff of nearly 90 continues to look skyward in search of scientific breakthroughs.

Visitors can interact with these achievements at the Steele Visitor Center. Opened during the observatory's centennial year in 1994, the center carries on Percival Lowell's astronomy advocacy by welcoming more than 80,000 guests each year. In addition to tour and lectures, guests can peer through telescopes, visit engrossing exhibits, and take in educational multimedia shows.

in addition to celebrating their heritage, t he astronomers at the Lowell Observatory are also looking towards the future. In 2012, they celebrated the completion of the new Discovery Channel Telescope. The 4.3-meter scope opens an even wider eye into the secrets of the universe and its foundations, and expands the research possibilities for the observatory's team of scientists. The telescope also serve the public good, lending its breathtaking images to programming produced by Discovery Communications.

1400 W Mars Hill Rd
Flagstaff,
AZ
US