BBQ Restaurants in Red Bank

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It’s more than just gooey, melted mozzarella on bubbling pizza. And it’s more than a long list of 29 sandwiches including meatball parmigiana and BBQ grilled chicken. Johns Pizzeria & Italian Restaurant has brought these dishes and more to thousands of events since opening in 1989. For offsite soirées—such as the ones they catered for the New York Police Department and Staten Island University Hospital—Johns can also provide tents, tables, and chairs that make planning a party so easy that some might want to start celebrating their birthday three times a year. Alternately, customers can dine in at their pizzeria, choosing from a menu of nearly 20 salads as well as seafood entrees and crowd-pleasing pizzas.

126 Lincoln Ave
Staten Island,
NY
US

Cuisine Type: Barbeque
Established: 1999
Most popular offering: Awarded pulled pork, chicken, pit beef, ribs
Kid-friendly: Yes
Pro Tip: Be a guest at your own party/event. Our array of great foods will have your guests talking for weeks

122 Main St
Sayreville,
NJ
US

The resident grill masters at Uncle Jimmy’s Backyard BBQ baste ribs, chicken, and pulled pork with zesty sauces, rounding out their menu of flame-kissed grub. Diners can oil rusty jaw hinges with meal-prefacing portions of fried zucchini strings ($6.50) or rent a forklift to ferry caramelized onions, fresh ricotta, and pulled pork from slices of barbecue pita pizza ($8) into waiting mouths. Rotisserie grilled chicken ($12 for a half bird) arrives dressed in barbecue sauce or lemon oreganata, and the Pig Out combo platter ($17) conquers carnivorous hunger pangs with a mighty triumvirate of pulled pork, ribs, and italian sausage. Each entree, such as the popular kansas city baby back ribs ($16 for a half slab), comes with two side dishes, such as sweet mashed potatoes or corn muffins, arriving on plates known to begin tugs of war with diners for the rights to them.

8727 4th Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Soco’s proprietors had a vision: to create a neighborhood institution that is equal parts restaurant and cocktail bar. With food and drink offerings such as the pecan-crusted pork chop and a caramel martini topped with a toasted marshmallow, it’s hard not to sample both sides of the business on any given visit. Before Soco opened, its owners and executive chef Kingley John all worked together at Negril Village, a West Village Caribbean eatery. That experience inspired the group to shape Soco’s menu into the fusion of southern-American classics and Caribbean influences now on its lunch, brunch, dinner, and cocktail menus. In practice, that combination brings about flavorful plates such as blackened salmon and jambalaya with seared shrimp, Andouille chicken sausage, and dirty rice. Grass-fed beef burgers are accentuated with caramelized onions, red-bean mayonnaise, and parmesan-dusted fries, and at lunch, organic fried chicken tops a red velvet waffle. The wait staff can also recommend food pairings with Boylan’s cane soda, 20 American microbrews, or the bar’s 10 signature cocktails. As an homage to Soco’s home borough, designer Andres Aladin drew up plans for the eatery to look like “the Brooklyn Bridge turned into a restaurant.” To accomplish that feat, he juxtaposed industrial elements such as locally sourced steel with the homey feel of exposed brick, walnut walls, and a rotating staff of mothers who watch until you clean your plate.

509 Myrtle Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Locally sourced maple, oak, and cherry wood smoke the day's selection of six meats, which could include Piedmontese beef short ribs or American lamb shank. Master barbecuer Matt Lang oversees their preparation, eschewing sauces for a proprietary panela-and-espresso-based spice rub. Pair the meats with a Kelso St. Gowanus ale or other craft brew.

354 Metropolitan Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

At Fatty 'Cue, Malaysian cooking and Southern-style barbecue collide under the inventive culinary guidance of Chef Zakary Pelaccio. He and his team place a creative twist on even the simplest of dishes, as the New York Times chronicled with the eatery's Vermont butter—wrapped in smoked maple leaves, soaked in rye whiskey, then "stored to age in a cool place for three months or so, like a fine cheese." This singular approach to cooking also earned plaudits from Grub Street, which crowned the smoked-brisket sandwich one of the 101 Best Sandwiches in New York. Dishes vary in size and complexity, beginning with smaller items such as housemade cheeses and smoky chicken and eggplant with celery, sesame, and pickled jalapeño. More sizable offerings include pork ribs with fish sauce as well as the smoked Brandt beef brisket, which Examiner.com declared, "[stands] up to the best briskets in the city," praising it as "extremely tender with flavorful burnt edges." Further, Fatty 'Cue's meats and fish are humanely raised and often locally sourced, helping the environment by obviating the need to print new maps.

91 South 6th Street
Brooklyn,
NY
US