Museums in Redmond


Select Local Merchants

Samuel Hill was undoubtedly a visionary in his own right, but having friends in high places didn't hurt him any. In 1907 he purchased 5,300 acres along the Columbia River to establish a Quaker farming community and found the Maryhill Land Company, named after his daughter. Seven years later he set to work building a mansion on the hill overlooking the river. But then his company folded and the mansion was without purpose. Enter friend number one: Parisian dance pioneer Loïe Fuller. She advised him to transform the cavernous building into an art museum. Throughout the next several years, he filled its halls with pieces from around the world, supplemented by works from Loïe's artist friends—including Auguste Rodin. And to further demonstrate his web of camaraderie, another friend of Hill's, Queen Marie of Romania, contributed Orthodox art and icons from her homeland. In 1926, the Queen dedicated the mansion as the Maryhill Museum of Art to a crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers. And yet the museum wasn't finished. When Hill died in 1931, the museum's board of trustees stepped in to helm the completion of the project. On May 13, 1940, on what would've been Hill's 83rd birthday, they opened the museum to the public. In the years immediately following, Hill collaborator and arts patron Alma de Bretteville Spreckels fortified the museum's already-impressive collection with works of art loaned and gifted from her own home. Today Maryhill overlooks the same vista, plus a sculpture garden, displaying its diverse collection of art from around the world. In addition to 80 original pieces by Rodin, including The Thinker, paintings by other European and American artists, and the Théâtre de la Mode French fashion exhibition, the museum's halls display Native American works from prehistoric times to the modern age. It also caters to younger minds with an activity room filled with games and child-friendly activity guides that make art accessible to kids so that parents don't have to carve Starry Night into their grilled cheese sandwiches.
35 Maryhill Museum Drive
Goldendale,
WA
US
Museums have a reputation for housing dusty, fragile artifacts that normally shouldn't be touched. But the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum is a different breed. Its passionate staff and crew of volunteers have collected and restored hundreds of historical cars, planes, and other vehicles, all of which they regularly start up and drive. Size: not surprisingly, the museum is located in an indoor hangar that stretches for more than 2.5 acres and can take more than a day to fully explore Eye Catcher: larger antique tractors, trucks, and military Jeeps loom over a fleet of their smaller siblings Permanent Mainstay: the Curtiss JN-4D "Jenny" from 1917 was lovingly restored by the museum's experts, who even applied the plane's finish the traditional way: with horsehair brushes. These planes were standard training aircraft for pilots in WWI. Don't Miss: seven different Ford Model T's from model years 1914?1927 Hidden Gems: the museum has almost 30 vintage motorcycles hiding beneath airplane wings and between cars. Guests are encouraged to try and spot all the hogs, including several Harley-Davidsons and one extra-elusive one named Waldo Special Programs: every "Second Saturday" of the month is a volunteer action day, when expert volunteers fire up the display vehicles for driving and flying demos
1600 Air Museum Rd
Hood River,
OR
US
Situated on a 54-acre plot of land near the Columbia River, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum chronicles thousands of years of the area?s natural and cultural history. The 48,200-square-foot facility?which received an American Institute of Architects Honor Award?features interactive and multimedia exhibits that let guests study everything from the volcanic activity and floods that created the gorge to its wildlife. Guests can stand in the shadow of a life-size, 13-foot mammoth in the Ice Age exhibit or hide from its intimidating tusks under a canvas tent modeled after the one used by Lewis and Clark. As the official interpretive center of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic area, the center celebrates the area?s indigenous flora and fauna while working to preserve them. Five acres of indigenous plants host turtles, ducks, geese, songbirds, and other native wildlife, on which guests spy as they stroll through the nature walk. At the raptor exhibit, visitors can come face-to-beak with various birds of prey, including a bald eagle, a great horned owl, and a red-tailed hawk. The Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum hosts frequent educational programs and tour groups that detail ways to protect the area?s biodiversity without having to marry a tree.
5000 Discovery Drive
The Dalles,
OR
US
In 1907, the Hood River County Pioneer Society started collecting documents and artifacts that reflected the diversity and culture of their region. Now those items are housed at The History Museum in a collection that totals 11,000-plus pieces and continues to grow weekly. With a focus on memorabilia that dates from the Native American era to the present, the museum’s exhibits include horse-drawn carriages, phonographs, and the barometer a witch concocted to predict the weather. To further immerse visitors in the county’s history, the costumed guides of the museum’s annual Cemetery Tales relay historical anecdotes during stops at notable gravesides. The tours are one of many events and educational programs available through the museum, many of which are geared toward kids. Other include yoga sessions that relate different poses to points in history and camps where youngsters learn to throw an atlatl, a spear used by Native Americans.
300 Portway Ave
Hood River,
OR
US
Through exhibits that explore everything from astronomy and physics to biology and paleontology, the Science Factory inspires a lifelong love of science in children as well as adults. Above all else, the nonprofit embraces a motto of "please touch," creating safe, engaging opportunities for children to act on their curiosity and gain insight into the principles underlying scientific and technological theories. The Exploration Dome exemplifies the immersive nature of the Museum, surrounding audiences with a full-dome screen that displays digital and live-action films. These educational features can take guests to virtually any location in the world and beyond, including the heart of the Borneo rainforest, the depths of prehistoric oceans, the edge of our galaxy's super-massive black hole, and a universe where popcorn kernels never get stuck in your teeth. Permanent exhibits—including a feature on responsible recycling as well as a terrarium of lizards, frogs, and plants, complete with Renegade, the Museum's resident iguana—explore topics in more depth, complementing both the Exploration Dome’s videos and an ever-changing roster of special attractions.
2300 Leo Harris Pkwy
Eugene,
OR
US
• For $12, you get a single membership for one year (up to a $25 value). • For $25, you get a family membership for one year (a $50 value).
740 W 13th Ave
Eugene,
OR
US
Advertisement