French Restaurants in Richfield

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In the mid-19th century, food-savvy Americans invented crêpes and delivered them to the masses in milk trucks. Today’s Groupon celebrates the rigorous crepage that swiftly conquered appetites across the nation with $10 worth of crêpes and crêpe-complementing beverages at La Belle Crepe for $5. Sweet and savory will tempt your buds when you indulge in one of the most charming and adored foods to ever grace this or any other earth, including Superman's Bizarro World, in which, in theory, bad foods should taste good.LibertyFrance: The ideal of liberty consists of being able to do anything that does not harm others.USA: Liberty is used mostly to wear pajama pants outside.

825 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Volnay Bistro was reviewed by the Minneapolis-St.Paul Star Tribune. OpenTable reviewers give it an average of four stars and 79% of Urbanspooners like the restaurant:

331 Broadway Ave S
Wayzata,
MN
US

Chez Daniel executive chef Wilver Sanchez interprets the cuisine of France with an eye for artful presentation, simple and fresh ingredients, and a creative sensibility. Attentive servers welcome diners with appetizing small plates, covering nude tables with plump escargot baked in garlic butter and house-smoked salmon toast. Lobster ravioli is tossed with saut?ed mushrooms before making a dazzling midmeal entrance in a mantle of roasted artichokes and lobster-tarragon sauce, while filet mignon is served with potatoes and a classic b?arnaise sauce. Chez Daniel also features a list of weekly specials. The dining room's exposed-brick, lofty archways, and elaborately adorned tables entice customers with an atmosphere as elegant as a tablecloth woven from Charlemagne?s beard.

2800 American Blvd. W
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Purple Sandpiper dishes up a menu of gourmet, locally sourced fare worthy of the OpenTable 2010 Diners' Choice Award. Thirsty patrons can whet tongues with a Minnesota-brewed Crispin Brut dry hard cider ($4.50) or a pint of Rush River Unforgiven amber ale ($5.50) imported from neighboring Wisconsin. Launch your meal quest with a plate of saffron risotto cakes served with tomato chutney and grilled scallions ($7). The duck confit with cassoulet caters to refined poultry palates with white beans cooked with bacon, vegetables, and duck coated in a layer of herb bread crumbs or sink ravenous canines ($19). Young-hearted adults and veggie-savvy young ones can bite into the roasted cauliflower mac 'n' cheese, artisan pasta in a heated existential debate with peppers, spinach, and a trio of cheeses ($15). End your journey toward gastronomic nirvana with a slab of the apple-cinnamon bread pudding submerged under a Titanic-sized glacier of house-made ice cream drizzled in buoyant, gooey caramel ($5).

8405 Lyndale Avenue South
Bloomington,
MN
US

Along with the end of Prohibition, 1933 brought sweeping changes across the country. It definitely changed the building at 1928 University Avenue NE in Minneapolis, which had been functioning as a hardware and furniture store for nearly a quarter-century. Proprietor Stanley Kozlak immediately went out and obtained a liquor license, transforming his retail shop into a bar and restaurant.

It would prove to be a smart decision?more than 80 years and two generations of Kozlaks later, Jax Cafe stands as a Minneapolis institution whose reputation has spread throughout the Midwest. This is thanks in part to singular touches such as reserved tables set with personalized matchbooks for expected guests and a stream on the lush covered patio from which diners can net their own rainbow trout for dinner. It?s no wonder Travel Channel foodie Andrew Zimmern has gushed that this restaurant is ?dripping with character.?

Part of that character comes from a certain adherence to traditions. Jax is furnished with patterned carpet, white linens, a grand piano, and a phone booth?yes, a phone booth?and the menu has the classic supper-club meals to match. Fresh Maine lobsters are kept in a saltwater tank said to be the first of its kind in the state, and the selection of award-winning Angus beef includes an 8-ounce filet the restaurant calls ?the steak that made Jax famous.? That?s not to say Jax is stuffy or old-fashioned?the menu also includes beer-can chicken, kids' meals, and craft beers served fresh from the tap, bottle, or keg-sized water balloon.

1928 University Ave. NE
Minneapolis,
MN
US

The culinary team at Common Roots Cafe believes that the best way to create a welcoming restaurant is to fully embrace local flavor in every sense of the word. Even the interior speaks to this mission?reclaimed barn wood makes up the dining room's floorboards and tabletops, the counter is composed of recycled cardboard, and the air is one-hundred percent Minnesotan. The overall effect is one of casual warmth, an atmosphere that makes the cafe an ideal spot for guests to chew on eclectic, yet accessible, cuisine and relax with a choice of 10 local craft beers.

The menu itself also bursts with hometown pride, highlighting local organic and sustainable ingredients. As much as half of the restaurant's food comes from farms located within 250 miles of Minneapolis, while some produce is picked right outside the door at the cafe's urban garden. And since the selection of ingredients alters with the seasons, the chefs adapt their dishes each month to showcase their fresh flavors. Previous offerings have included redfish tacos with jicama slaw, mac 'n' cheese with local cheddar, and house-made tagliatelle pasta topped with a hearty bison bolognese sauce. Bites are complemented with sips from a drink list featuring wines?many made from organic grapes?and local beers. And, in the unlikely event that diners leave any food on their plates, the scraps are carefully composted to continue the cafe's green production cycle.

2558 Lyndale Ave S
Minneapolis,
MN
US