Galleries in Rosedale


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  • McFadden Art Glass
    Featured in the Baltimore Sun, owner Tim McFadden teaches neophytes to design and shape seasonal blown-glass ornaments in hands-on workshops. Duos and quartets of apprentices assemble by a blazing forge to help inflate glass balloons that soon harden into icicle ornaments, pendants, or single-use snowball cores. One-of-a-kind pieces are available to take home the following day.
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    6802 Eastern Avenue
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Corradetti Glass Studio and Gallery
    Just like breakups, the art of blowing glass creates hardened, delicate pieces that preserve the spontaneity of a whisper or a sigh in one-of-a-kind forms. Today's deal preserves your own moment in time, or lets you take home someone else's inspired, hardworking moments: $20 gets you $40 toward your choice of glass-blowing workshops or handsome blown-glass gifts at Corradetti Glass Studio and Gallery. “I know!” thought Annie, and she fetched her grandfather’s glassblowing implements, utilizing them safely, but nonetheless in a way that children must never attempt. She took a heated rod and rested it gently, first on his shoulders, then hips and knees, until all his joints were momentarily pliable enough for limited locomotion.
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    2010 Clipper Park Rd, Ste 119
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Reginald F. Lewis Museum
    Established: 2005 Handicap Accessible: Yes Staff Size: 25?50 Parking: Parking garage Reservations/Appointments: Optional Most popular offering: African-American art, history, culture Pro Tip: $6 validated parking is directly across the street at the PMI Parking Garage. Good for Kids: Yes Walk-ins Welcome: Yes The Reginald F. Lewis Museum celebrates the achievements of African Americans, especially those from Maryland?which often means expanding on grade-school history lessons. For instance, Betsy Ross is typically credited with making the first American flag. However, one of the museum's rotating exhibits reveals that Grace Wisher, an African American indentured servant, also worked on the original star spangled banner. Dubbed "For Whom It Stands: The Flag and the American People," that exhibit was recognized as one of the country's best in the summer of 2014 by USA Today?in part because it featured a scrap of the real, first flag, covered in the bald eagle feathers that filled the air back then. That's just one of the myriad rotating exhibits that the museum has hosted, to complement permanent collections that highlight Maryland African Americans' endurance through two centuries of slavery, and their artistic and intellectual innovations. Q&A with Helen Yuen, Director Of Marketing What sets your business apart from your competition? A Smithsonian affiliate, the museum is the east coast?s largest African-American museum. Besides rotating exhibitions, enjoy live musical performances from gospel jazz to steel drums. Films in our theater have enriched audiences on the history of soul food, civil rights, and more. For families, programs like art workshops and living history bring our mission to life. Lectures and our resource center enrich what you'll find in our permanent collection. We also nourish the body with the best soul food in Baltimore at our museum cafe. Visit our website for a full calendar of events. What was the inspiration for starting this business? To showcase the rich contributions of Maryland African Americans, from Harriet Tubman and Thurgood Marshall to the unsung heroes who helped make Maryland what it is today. What?s your favorite part about your job? Having people experience something new, different, and enriching to their lives.
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    830 E Pratt St.
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower
    Looming 15 stories above the surrounding streets, the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower has been a landmark in Baltimore ever since it was constructed in 1911. Upon completion, this structure?inspired by the design of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy?was the tallest building in the city and served as a symbol of Baltimore's advancement to its creator, the inventor of the titular headache remedy. The Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts decided to preserve this proudly progressive legacy by adapting the layout to create studio spaces for more than 30 visual and literary artists hoping to continue their work within a modernized setting. Guests can visit the historical clock tower on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as during lightning storms that will send plucky characters back to 1985. Tours enter the structure's clock room, whose faces feature the words "Bromo-Seltzer" instead of numerals, for peeks at the inner workings and vistas that include Camden Yards. During open-studio hours, visitors also have the opportunity to see the artists' workspaces and view nascent pieces in a variety of media, such as oil painting, photography, sculpture, digital art, and charcoal.
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    21 S Eutaw St
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Station North Arts Cafe Gallery
    Head to Station North Arts Cafe Gallery in Charles North for a steaming cup of joe. Low-fat foods are not on the menu at Station North Arts Cafe Gallery, though, so plan to indulge a bit. The perfect place to take the kids, dining out at Station North Arts Cafe Gallery won't cost you a sitter. There's no need to winnow the guest list for a night out at Station North Arts Cafe Gallery — the coffee shop has tons of space for big parties. Dress is typically casual at Station North Arts Cafe Gallery, so leave the fancy duds behind for the evening. Dining out isn't your only option here — pickup is available, too. Impress the diners at your next gathering by calling in Station North Arts Cafe Gallery for catering. Guests of Station North Arts Cafe Gallery's North Charles Street location can park their vehicles on the street. Prices don't get much better than this, either, with typical meals running under the $15 mark.
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    1816 North Charles Street
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Load of Fun
    Glass Mind Theatre's cast and crew turns the fairy tale of Cinderella on its head with their latest production, Adapting Cinderella, which interweaves elements from the story's countless retellings in films and books to create a unique plotline that questions what constitutes an ideal Prince Charming. With the same enthusiasm for thought-provoking live production that earned the company honors of Best New Theater from City Paper in 2010, Artistic director Andrew Peters guides an ensemble cast as it flutters and fights in sync with Sarah Ford Gorman's choreography and Quinn S.'s original music.
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    120 W North Ave
    Baltimore, MD US
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