Tours in Downtown St. Louis


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Fresh fare can be found at Landry's Seafood House, where visitors seek to sample every seafood dish on the menu. If you're avoiding fat or gluten, you can still eat great at Landry's Seafood House, which offers a number of low-fat and gluten-free choices. Find the perfect vintage to complement your meal — Landry's Seafood House offers a fine selection of wines, beers, and beyond. Come order a flavorful feast at Landry's Seafood House, and sit outside if it's nice! Landry's Seafood House is a suitable restaurant for both large and small groups. null A nearby parking lot is readily available for Landry's Seafood House's diners. You can fill up on Landry's Seafood House's delicious fare without spending an arm and a leg — in fact, typical meals there run under $15.
1820 Market St
Saint Louis,
MO
US
Vintage red trolleys and horse-drawn carriages still roll through the streets of St. Louis. Though sometimes caused by a rip in the space-time vortex, more often than not they're part of the St. Louis Carriage & Trolley Company's leisurely history tours. A certified guide leads these trips in trolley busses or carriages drawn by some of the company's 17 elegant horses, including Percheron draft horses, one Clydesdale, and one Belgium. The tours?which can be customized?pass sites such as Union Station, Peabody Opera House, and the picturesque Laclede's Landing.
1820 Market St.
St. Louis,
MO
US
More than a century ago, the architects of The Lemp Brewery complex faced a problem: how should they keep their beer cold? Refrigerators weren't yet around, and it'd be too difficult to tow an iceberg down from the Arctic. Their solution: going 100 feet underground, where old caves were naturally cool... or so they thought. In fact, the chilly air here wasn't caused by lack of sunlight?it was the result of an ancient curse. Today, visitors can still tour the subterranean brewery, now appropriately known as the Abyss. It's hardly abandoned. Around every turn waits a new monster, none of whom are friendly enough to offer any complimentary growlers. The Abyss is just one of Scarefest's three chilling destinations. Creepyworld houses 12 attractions, including a series of mazes filled with everything from burning cars to ravenous zombies. In another part of town, a haunted house known as The Darkness plunges visitors into a world of terror. In its two-decade history, the haunted house has even shown up on national TV, which is not too bad a gig for a place infested by deranged clowns.
1525 S 8th St.
Saint Louis,
MO
US
?St. Louis is the fourth-most-haunted city in America,? the tour guide said on a tour covered by Narratively. "But your tour guide is No. 1.? That guide is David Riordan, a renaissance man who's been a commodities trader, lawyer, and Spanish real-estate seller, and now-owner of Riordan Tours. It was his time in Spain that inspired him to become a tour guide. He practiced his storytelling on the English-language radio station he bought and then began leading homespun tours through the small, picturesque town of Frigiliana. But when the Spanish economy soured, he moved back to his native St. Louis. Now he draws on his natural talent for yarn spinning and leads groups to tourist attractions and haunted corners of the 250-year-old metropolis. Along the ghost tour, David unravels chilling yarns about events that inspired The Exorcist, the St. Louis Fire, the cholera epidemic, and spirits that still roam the streets, asking people which bus they should catch to get to the afterlife. The less spooky city tours explore the UNESCO World Heritage site Cahokia Mounds, as well as the Cardinal's Busch Stadium and the Gateway Arch. David also puts his storytelling skills to use at his Unveiled: History & Hauntings of St Louis shows. Accompanied by a folk guitarist, he regales crowds with tales of the city's history. "I can talk about anything," he told the Riverfront Times. "It's not just ghosts and spirits, [it's] the brewery, steamboats, gangsters."
721 N 2nd St.
St Louis,
MO
US
Your one-hour cruise will commence at the levee below the Gateway Arch aboard one of two 19th-century replica steamboats, either the Tom Sawyer or the Becky Thatcher. Like a real-life third person, the captain of your craft will omnisciently narrate your adventure along the St. Louis riverfront with historical factoids, geographical trivia, and wistful recollections of the way your childhood crush's hair used to sparkle in the springtime sunlight. Customers looking for even greater detail may choose to rent one of Gateway's iPods for an additional fee. This audio cruise companion whispers stories of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers' confluence into your ears, set to the sweet beats of this year's hottest jock jams. Since exercising one's vision and hearing can make one's other senses hungry, boxed lunches may be ordered in advance ($8 for a box lunch, $4 for a hot-dog lunch). You can also sniff, fondle, and purchase concessions while aboard—or enjoy a bite to eat at Gateway's Arch View Café before or after your tour.
707 N 2nd St
Saint Louis,
MO
US
An authentic trolley with brass rails and bells and outfitted with modern padded seats and air conditioning glides through St. Louis?s historic neighborhoods as knowledgeable tour guides wax poetic about the city?s past and present. Guests gaze out of the trolley?s charming arched windows during the 23-mile ride, catching sight of a much larger arch standing sentry over downtown sites such as St. Louis Union Station and the Mississippi River. Tour guides fling droplets of wisdom like handfuls of rice at famished newlyweds, sharing anecdotes about historic Laclede?s Landing and Forest Park, the site of the 1904 World?s Fair, the first summer Olympic games held in the U.S., and the first forest. The fully narrated tour departs and returns from Lumiere Place Casino on the riverfront.
999 North 2nd St
St. Louis,
MO
US
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