Groceries & Markets in Midtown

Select Local Merchants

It takes three easy steps to complete a treat at Flying Cow Frozen Yogurt. First, step up to the self-service machines and pour out a generous helping of low-calorie, calcium-chocked frozen yogurt, which offers constantly changing flavors. Whether you choose classic chocolate, vanilla, or georgia peach makes no difference?each flavor is filled with active cultures, which can aid in digestion. Next, sidle up to the toppings bar where up to 30 toppings await and choose from fresh fruit, candy, or nuts, making sure to cap things off with sweet sauces including white chocolate and cream-cheese icing. The implicit third step involves grabbing a spoon and digging in until the cows come home, or at least until they call to say they're running late.

3331 Locust St.
Saint Louis,
MO
US

The Fountain On Locust has earned accolades such as St. Louis Magazine's award for Best Restaurant On a Budget in 2012 and an honorable mention as one of Sauce Magazine's favorite restaurants to impress out-of-towners. Described as "luscious" by Sauce Magazine reviewers, the café's ice-cream creations skew toward adults. They may be topped with hand-crafted sauces or blended into champagne floats and eclectic ice-cream martinis. On the menu, these sweets converge with a panoply of vintage cocktails and playful café dishes that include hot roast-beef melts and a turkey BLT "so good you might cry."

The retro cuisine meshes perfectly with the vintage-inspired decor, highlighted by walls of hand-painted midnight-blue murals. Black and white tile floors spread out from a wooden bar lit with art deco-style hanging lamps, much like the kind F. Scott Fitzgerald described in his unpublished novella about Gatsby's electrician. And yet the restaurant's eclectic design isn't limited to the dining space—The Fountain won Cintas' America's Best Restroom Award in 2010.

3037 Locust St
Saint Louis,
MO
US

The owners of Vino Vitae welcome newcomers and connoisseurs alike to the wide world of wine appreciation. They constantly research wines, sharing bottles not typically found in the aisles of grocery stores with groups during classes and tastings held indoors at their shop's bar or, in warm weather, on an outdoor patio. Guests may learn how to describe the scent of wine using an aroma wheel, how to judge quality, and other skills.

1637 S 18th St
Saint Louis,
MO
US

Featured on the "Deli Delights" episode of the Food Network's The Best Of program, the team at Kopperman's Specialty Foods & Deli works hard to deliver a classic delicatessen experience. They serve breakfast all day as well as overnight on Fridays and Saturdays, poaching eggs for benedicts and frying potato pancakes for orders of latkes. Smoked salmon and trout top bagels with cream cheese and housemade chopped chicken liver dresses up slices of rye bread. Carnegie Deli salami, corned beef, and pastrami come in from New York City, as do cheesecakes, black forest cakes, and apple crumb pies baked in the Statue of Liberty's torch.

386 N Euclid Ave
Saint Louis,
MO
US

In 1972, Herbie Balaban opened a café in St. Louis’s West End, turning his former beatnik-boutique space into a French-inspired café. He grins from old pictures of the restaurant, a handlebar mustache curling upward toward a jaunty beret in crisp black and white. Though the space has changed hands in the ensuing years, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch said it “would be an excellent restaurant in any era.” Aaron Teitelbaum, now the executive chef, honed his craft in New York City while working with Bobby Flay and Daniel Boulud in their kitchens. Aromas drift from Herbie’s own kitchen, hinting at French, Asian, and American influences. Those culinary traditions swirl together in truffled lobster mac 'n' cheese and shrimp with grits and buttermilk-fried leeks. Goat cheese steeps in smoke before melting with peppered bacon across burgers alongside a trout salad, of which a writer for the St. Louis Post Dispatch said, “I’d normally prefer no adulteration to well-smoked trout, but in this case folding in a gentle horseradish crème fraîche was a perfect foil for a fluffy, slightly sweet corn pancake underneath.” Grilled duck breast pairs with a duck-confit crepe served on an original Duck Hunt game cartridge, and Herbie’s Vintage 72's wine list is carefully curated to incorporate vintages from around the world, prioritizing US and French wines above all. The interior at Herbie’s Vintage 72 was designed by co-owner Jeff Orbin, whose past triumphs include restaurants such as Miso in Clayton and Monarch Restaurant & Wine Bar. Much like the food, the décor blends French and American influences, incorporating some of the antique French posters that decorated the walls of the café in the ‘70s. Inverted teardrop lamps and tableside candles illuminate the restaurant, which is surrounded by exposed-brick walls. Patrons settle in at curved corner booths or opt for open-air dining to enjoy their meal, and chatter drifts up from private parties amid the wine cellar’s barrels and rough stone walls.

405 N Euclid Ave
Saint Louis,
MO
US

Juicy tidbits of chocolate-dunked fruit arrive on the doorsteps of family and friends, done up in colorful bouquets and candy boxes by the skilled fruit arrangers at Edible Arrangements' more than 1,100 franchises worldwide. The company's in-house chocolatiers decorate albion strawberries and daisy pineapples in sweet flavors. Once properly chocolated, the workers organize the preservative-free sweets into lush arrangements that resemble flowers in bloom. Customers can choose to display their bouquets in a variety of vessels, including vases, mugs, and sports- or holiday-themed containers that add a personal touch. Alternatively, customers can opt to adorn gifts with the cheery, red lids of candy boxes, nestling 12 morsels inside to build anticipation and determine if loved ones have x-ray vision as they guess whether fruit will come dusted in shredded coconut or drizzled in white chocolate.

418 N 10th St
Saint Louis,
MO
US