Food & Drink in Salem

Select Local Merchants

Sixty2 on Wharf is owned by Tony Bettencourt, the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts–trained former chef of the acclaimed Tomasso Trattoria in Southborough. Since opening in 2008, Sixty2 has seduced Salem stomachs with contemporary re-inventions of Italian classics. Bettencourt's meals use local and fresh ingredients shipped to the restaurant via seahorse-drawn gondola. The antipasti platter ($22) allows the chef to drop some knowledge on your plate, as he fills the plate with whichever antipasti options he deems best for the climate and current astrological alignment. Pasta dishes include the potato-filled cappellacci ($24 for full size) and the ribbon-like tagliatelle with a traditional meat-based Bolognese sauce ($26 for full size), while an assortment of entrees ($22–$30) include duck, lamb, chicken, and sea scallops seasoned and spiced to flavorful magnificence. The warm toffee-pudding dessert is a sweet salvo guaranteed to lob a taste grenade at any lingering post-entree hunger.

62 Wharf St
Salem,
MA
US

We are a family owned and operated Sub Shop. Featuring Grilled Toasted and Cold Subs. As well as fresh made salads. We also have 1/4 lb Angus Burgers and Natural Cut Sea Salt French Fries. We have a large dining room that seats 40 customers as well as an outdoor patio with more seating.

354 N Broadway
Salem,
NH
US

With Super Bowl Sunday, March Madness, Cricket Craziness, and the World Cup all on the horizon, Boston sports fans will be in desperate need of a table surrounded by HDTVs. Today's deal gets you all this, plus a trivia night: for $20, you get $40 worth of creative pub grub and drinks at Tavern in the Square. This Groupon is good for all three Boston-area locations, as well as one secret mailbox location if you are quail-sized or smaller.

189 Washington St
Salem,
MA
US

Within each of its quaint, cozy eateries, Café Polonia's hearty comfort food provides a flavorful foray into transatlantic treats. Whether perusing the Boston menu or the larger Salem menu, traditional starters such as borsch ($6) and herring filets in oil ($7–$8) act as a delectable lead-in to heartier fare, such as the giant potato gypsy pancake stuffed with hungarian goulash and topped with sour cream and bragging rights ($16). Fulfill meat-laden dreams with a variety of juicy sausage dishes including the kielbasa and cabbage stew ($12–$15), or effortlessly colonize a mouth with the Polish plate, populated with hunter's stew, stuffed cabbage, grilled kielbasa, and fluffy pierogi ($16–$18).

118 Washington St
Salem,
MA
US

Today, Victoria Station in Salem is unique—but it wasn't always. In 1970, inspired by the landmark Victoria Station in London, three Cornell Hotel School graduates created a restaurant with English touches, such as a bright-red phone booth and authentic train cars they'd turned into dining cars. They opened up in San Francisco, and the business grew. By the 1980s, there were about 100 Victoria Station locations in the United States and around the world. Johnny Cash did a stint as their spokesman.

But the company filed for bankruptcy in 1986. Its rise and fall is documented in Tom Blake's book Prime Rib and Boxcars: Whatever Happened to Victoria Station? The waterfront Salem location was the very last to open, and it's the only one left.

Today, the restaurant has gone in its own direction, drawing inspiration from both the restaurant's past and its current surroundings. Classic New England cuisine and old steak-house favorites mingle comfortably on the menu. The chefs coat haddock in a seasoned cracker crust to bake and serve with chardonnay and fresh lemon juice, and the slow-roasted prime rib that made the original restaurant famous still has a place on the menu. Diners can also order up house favorites, such as lobster mac 'n' cheese with five-cheese béchamel sauce and cornbread shallot crumbs, or they can opt for an Angus burger.

Vic's Boathouse, a bar and lounge, opened in 2010. There, diners can request a local or craft brew, order a martini, or pick from the pub menu. The bar hosts nightly live entertainment, including open-mic sessions, live musicians, and karaoke, which makes for lively evenings without the expense of hiring a DJ for family dinner.

86 Wharf St
Salem,
MA
US

The Salem jail, built in 1813, was the home of countless criminals for more than a century; today, it's the home of The Great Escape Restaurant. "Gone are the days of just bread and water…now the meals here are big portions of pasta, seafood, and steak," according to a video by Phantom Gourmet. While previously alcohol was only available when it was smuggled in, today the Great Escape's bartenders mix up prison-themed cocktails like the Orange Jumpsuit and The Commuted Sentence. In addition, complimentary valet service seamlessly escorts guests to the dinner table.

Under high ceilings, black chandeliers illuminate a bar made from recycled cell doors, the jail's original thick granite floor, and cell bars that surround black leather booths. Exposed brick walls are decorated with pop art with cheeky sayings such as "If you can't do the time don't do the crime," though today's guests are more focused on fried calamari than rehabilitation.

50 Saint Peter St
Salem,
MA
US

Groupon Guide