Galleries in North Salem


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  • Peabody Essex Museum
    In 1799, Salem’s weathered seafarers founded the East India Marine Society and began to assemble “natural and artificial curiosities” brought back from their journeys to Asia, Africa, and other distant lands. Over the following centuries, the collection grew, and while it did, the Society evolved through various shapes until it became the Peabody Essex Museum. Today, more than 1.8 million of these works invite visitors to explore the world in a facility that underwent a $200 million transformation in 2003. The majority of works now rest in a Moshe Safdie–designed glass-and-brick building, focused around a sunny atrium whose various architectural silhouettes echo local forms. This new building joins the East India Marine Hall, built by the seafarers’ society in 1825 and dedicated in a ceremony attended by President John Adams. Today, that National Historic Landmark hosts society-member portraits and a number of the hall’s original objects; in other galleries, paintings and sculptures by Japanese, Indian, and Chinese artists hang on the walls or perch in glass cases like pies with personal-space issues. Guests can also tour Yin Yu Tang, the only complete Qing Dynasty house outside of China and a 200-year-old structure with intricate carvings. In 2013, the Peabody Essex Museum will add exciting new displays to its rotating special exhibitions, from Faberge treasures to impressionistic masterpieces from the likes of Monet, Renoir, and Manet, as well as modern African-American art and contemporary art from India. After marveling at the skill and diversity of the artwork, visitors can drop by the Atrium Café or the Garden Restaurant for a bite to eat.
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    East India Square, 161 Essex St
    Salem, MA US
  • The Jonathan Corwin House / The Witch House
    "The Jonathan Corwin House" and "The Witch House" are two monikers for the same house, where wealthy Puritan Jonathan Corwin lived with his family in 1692?the year of the Salem Witch Trials. Corwin, in fact, was a magistrate and judge of the trials, during which both women and men were often accused for the crime of practicing witchcraft, and many times executed. Today, visitors can tour the Corwins' historic home, which is the last structure with direct ties to the 1692 trials, learning about how the architecture, furniture, and artifacts tie in with the nation's history.
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    2 Essex St
    Salem, MA US
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