Museums in Salem

Select Local Merchants

Though Wilford and Olive Arms haven't lived in their house for decades, the sprawling Arts and Crafts-style stone building still holds their story. Today, the original period rooms house the Arms Family Museum of Local History, where permanent and temporary exhibits interpret different facets of the estate's?and the surrounding area's? history. One explores the home's conception and construction with original photographs, sketches, and Lego models, while another unveils the history of radio-broadcasting in Mahoning Valley. The Valley Experience exhibit, meanwhile, showcases the Mahoning River region's cultural past, focusing on the daily lives of those who lived there, from the first Native Americans to European immigrants to African-American freemen.

648 Wick Ave
Youngstown,
OH
US

The National Packard Museum preserves the Detroit-made Packards from 1903 to 1956, famous for their white-walled tires and art-deco chrome hood ornaments. The car of choice for statesmen and actors, the meticulously maintained Packards populate the National Packard Museum?s halls and exhibits. And they range from all eras, from the 1900 Model B to limousines, ambulances, and convertibles from the 1950s. Museum visitors learn how the Packard line advanced vehicular safety standards and how the company implemented design innovations, such as the steering wheel. Auto enthusiasts will also find the National Packard Museum replete with historical photographs, product catalogs, and company documents, which reveal plans to create a car that could be driven by super-intelligent muskrats by 1992.

1899 Mahoning Ave NW
Warren,
OH
US

The Canton Classic Car Museum exhibits 40 pristine and restored automobiles from yesteryear, which mingle among rare memorabilia pulled from the last two centuries. In one of the decade-focused rooms, a Packard hearse shares floor space with a 1937 bulletproof Studebaker, a car designed to protect policemen from bank robbers and dive-bombing pigeons. Cars like the 1966 Ford Mustang Convertible offset rare and little-known models such as the Holmes, built in Canton and declared possibly America's ugliest car.

Filling the walls and the spaces between the cars, oriental rugs and vintage Tonka trucks mix in with treasures from Canton?s bygone era. A fortune-telling machine from Meyers Lake Amusement Park stands ready to peer into the future, porcelain signs advertise businesses long since closed, and political keepsakes from President McKinley?s term remind viewers of a time when the political machine was focused on keeping outer space from crushing Earth.

104 6th St SW
Canton,
OH
US

MAPS Air Museum’s historical exhibits and collection of military aircraft educate visitors on military aviation history and Northwest Ohio’s role in it. Restored aircraft such as the F-86 SabreDog and B-26 Marauder (one of only seven on display in the world) give guests an up-close look at actual mechanical birds, rather than having to imagine real birds being piloted by humans. Permanent displays on Pearl Harbor, the Tuskegee Airmen, and Rosie the Riveter delve into iconic moments of World War II, and artifacts and memorabilia from veteran Reamer E. “Buzz” Sewell trace one soldier’s journey. For more information on tours or special events, visit the museum online.

2260 International Pkwy
North Canton,
OH
US

The Perkins Stone Mansion was originally commissioned by Colonel Simon Perkins, the son of Akron's founder. Completed in 1837, but updated most recently in 2006, the sandstone building remains one of Ohio's most noteworthy pieces of Greek Revival architecture. It features numerous architectural highlights, including a two-story portico, elliptical frieze windows, and intricate interior woodwork. The historical site serves as a testament to Perkins' family history and the history of Akron and Summit County.

550 Copley Rd
Akron,
OH
US

By exploring the Jewish people’s emigration to and experience in America, the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage encourages reflection and tolerance in visitors. Before entering the museum, open since 2005, guests can marvel at its façade, constructed from more than 126 tons of hand-chiseled golden jerusalem limestone. A timeline of Jewish, American, and world history unfolds in the lobby, and an orientation film and a Finding Nemo remake exclusively starring gefilte fish screen in the 60-seat briefing theater. Touring collections grace the special-exhibition gallery, and the 7,000-square-foot permanent-exhibition space shares the stories of America’s Jewish immigrants—from their arrival to the aftermath of the Second World War—with interactive stations, films, and oral histories. Elsewhere, ritual objects, sacred scrolls, and fine art from The Temple Museum of Religious Art grace the walls of the light-filled Temple-Tifereth Israel Gallery.

2929 Richmond Rd
Beachwood,
OH
US