Sightseeing in San Angelo

Select Local Merchants

The Railway Museum of San Angelo transports visitors back in time to 1888 with its a wealth of exhibits on the area's rich train history. Guests wander through exhibits filling the historic Orient-Santa Fe Depot, which was built in 1909 and bid adieu to its last passenger train in 1965. Inside the depot, guests can pore over artifacts such as switch machines, dinnerware used in the luxury streamliners, and railroad equipment. They can also gaze at old photos in the history gallery and model railroad layouts with miniature train tracks and buildings the same size they were in the 1800s.

703 S Chadbourne St
San Angelo,
TX
US

The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts dedicates itself to educating the public and preserving the heritage of West Texas through a permanent collection of contemporary art and numerous temporary exhibits. With a Supporter membership, patrons receive a bevy of benefits, including free admission, invitations to all galas and lectures, and members-only rentals of the museum's scenic terrace, an ideal birthday-party venue for any art critic, sculptor, or paintbrush. The museum is renowned for its extensive collection of ceramics, as well as its displays of contemporary and folk artwork from influential local artists including Vernon Fisher, Emma Lee Moss, and Harding Black. Among three new temporary exhibitions opening April 15, Different Directions: Coming Together in Clay showcases the works of a quartet of contemporary ceramicists, and The Tile Club—Artists of America’s Aesthetic Movement displays the sculptures, prints, and tiles of a band of 19th-century New York–based muse-wranglers.

1 Love St
San Angelo,
TX
US

The ebony- and ivory-toned Black Swan Wine Bar treats palates to a multifarious cheese menu of Northern Hemisphere–culled curds sided with small snacks. Canadian-aged cheddar and Danish-aged Gouda entertain with salty quips and wheel-borne wisdom for new tasters, while French-bred blue cheese and creamy brie pair for a smooth and sophisticated pungent effect. Unlike cotswald, a firm variety of gloucester cheese, semi-soft English blue stilton crumbles under pressure from prodding tongues and relentless Cutco knife salesmen. Curdled from the milk of Manchega sheep, slightly piquant Spanish manchego caresses taste receptors with its creamy texture and exotic bleat, as nibblers alternate between fromage bites and complementary olives, grapes, and crackers.

118 S Chadbourne St
San Angelo,
TX
US

The Grace Museum builds connections through new experiences in art, science and history within the evolving Texas story through its exhibitions, programs and collections.

102 Cypress St
Abilene,
TX
US

Scurry County Museum offers a window into the county's past that's equally useful for locals and tourists. The permanent exhibit showcases a timeline of the county's development, highlighting everything from buffalo hunting to the oil boom. Rotating exhibits explore historical realities such as homemaking in the frontier days. Visitors can shop for unique gifts in the museum store, stocked with books, mugs, T-shirts, and other specialty items.

6200 College Ave
Snyder,
TX
US

The Fort Concho Museum comprises about 40 acres of the area formerly covered by the historic Fort Concho, built in 1867 to protect frontier settlements and host the patrols of the West Texas region. With this deal, fort fans will be able to peruse the line of barracks and its reproduction of an artillery piece, then venture into the post headquarters which concurrently served as the headquarters for the District of Pecos. Rebuilt in 1986, the fort's hospital depicts its original appearance before it was struck by lightning and burned down in 1911, while the multipurpose schoolhouse and chapel building illustrates how 19th-century soldiers and their families made use of space for religion, schooling, and all-night video-game tournaments.

630 S Oakes St
San Angelo,
TX
US