Restaurants in West Side

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J. Anthony’s eclectic maritime menu dishes up fresh seafood and ceviche alongside a land-trotting troop of appetizers, burgers, and poultry entrees. Hand-breaded daily by a merry band of loaf-armed chefs, J. Anthony’s fried seafood entrees include an 8-ounce catfish filet and its hulking jumbo shrimp sidekicks ($7.29) as well as a Mexican-inspired medley of fish tacos ($6.49) and seafood enchiladas ($7.99). Fresh campechana invites taste buds to a rollicking deep-sea soiree with a cocktail's worth of delectable fish, shrimp, oysters, crabmeat, and octopus ($5.99 for a medium, $9.99 for a large). Diners can fix fangs into a variety of bun-ensconced beauties bursting with meat, fish, shrimp, and oysters ($3.29–$6.89), or gather ancestors, acquaintances, and peg-legged parrots for one of J. Anthony's colossal family feasts ($12.89–$25.99).

847 S General McMullen Dr
San Antonio,
TX
US

Inside the kitchens of Fajita Taco Place's four locations, chefs prepare classic Mexican dishes and house-made salsa alongside Tex-Mex standbys. In the morning, servers deliver plates of huevos rancheros and pancakes alongside steaming mugs of coffee. For lunch and dinner, they serve tacos, fajitas, and steaks, then bring out margaritas and imported beers to the escalating cheers of a studio audience.

1816 Thompson Pl
San Antonio,
TX
US

Farmhand. Army mule tender. Insurance salesman. Ferryboat entrepreneur. Failed political candidate. Motel operator. This unconventional resumé belonged to Harland Sanders before he founded KFC at age 65. He opened his restaurant alongside a new highway interstate, serving up what he called “Sunday dinner, seven days a week” to those on the go. The highlight of his menu was—and still is—the top-secret spice blend coating his crispy fried chicken. He kept the recipe under lock and key, but word of his irresistible chicken quickly spread across the country. In 1935, Kentucky Governor Ruby Laffoon recognized Sanders's contributions to the state's cuisine by awarding him the honorary title of Kentucky Colonel.

The Colonel passed in 1980, though he lived long enough to see his humble restaurant rise to worldwide prominence. Diners still dig into buckets of his crave-worthy fried chicken, though the menu has expanded to encompass extra-crispy and grilled chicken as well as hot wings and chicken sandwiches. And it wouldn’t be Sunday dinner seven days a week without trusty southern sides such as mac 'n' cheese, mashed potatoes, and biscuits. In keeping with the down-home theme, chocolate chips dot cake and cookie desserts, honoring the 13 chocolate stars Betsy Ross sewed onto the first American flag.

4711 W Commerce St
San Antonio,
TX
US

From the bustling stalls of Beijing's markets to the refined quiet of Tokyo's sushi bars, no Chinese or Japanese culinary tradition escapes the notices of Bean Sprout's chefs. Whether they're tossing together quick lunches or filling family dinner orders, they blend the best parts of the two nations' traditions into dishes ranging from crispy duck to mu shu pork. In addition to preparing hot entrees, the chefs slice and assemble nigiri and rolls, with favorites including California rolls and the full moon special, which gets larger or smaller depending on the time of the month.

14 Northwest 25th Street
San Antonio,
TX
US

At Munchies. It's All Good, the cooks will deep-fry just about anything: pickles, avocados, the picnic tables in the dining room. The restaurant's main focus, however, is barbecue. Brisket, ribs, and chicken are served alongside hearty fixings such as Texas toast and baked beans. Diners can order these morsels by the pound, or as combination platters.

1822 N. Zarzamora Street
San Antonio,
TX
US

As the name suggests, Papa's Burgers is focused on one thing: burgers, plain and simple. Cooks pride themselves on grilling up juicy, old-fashioned burgers that quiet rumbling bellies with generous helpings of delicious beef.

709 Old Highway 90 W
San Antonio,
TX
US