Japanese Restaurants in North Beach


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  • Sushi On North Beach Katsu
    Whether you are in the mood for sushi or sashimi, Sushi On North Beach Katsu has it all. Your pals with special dietary considerations — including those who avoid fat, gluten, and animal products — will still find plenty of tasty and suitable items on the menu. Beer, wine, and more are also available from Sushi On North Beach Katsu's extensive drink list. Load up the mini-van and bring the kids to Sushi On North Beach Katsu — they'll love the menu and scene here as much as mom and dad. Heading out with a larger party? There's plenty of space for big groups at Sushi On North Beach Katsu. Make a reservation to ensure your table is ready when you are. Shake off the stiff workday duds at Sushi On North Beach Katsu — attire is casual. For those in a rush, the sushi spot lets you take your food to go. Call Sushi On North Beach Katsu for catering if you have a big event coming up. Drivers should plan to park on the street when dining at Sushi On North Beach Katsu's Columbus Ave residence. Prices are affordable, with a typical meal running under $30.
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    745 Columbus Ave
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Sushi Hunter
    Sushi Hunter: A User’s Guide All-You-Can Eat Sushi | Ramen and Udon Bowls | Handmade Kitchen Entrees Sample Menu Appetizer: shrimp siu mai, or steamed shrimp dumplings Specialty sushi: Tiger Eye with tempura salmon, cream cheese, avocado, cucumber, and jalapeño wrapped in soy paper Kitchen entree: unaju, barbecued eel served over rice with sweet eel sauce Bottomless option: Pay a flat rate and order off the all-you-can-eat menu, available daily. Inside Tip: For an additional fee, all-you-can-eat diners can add a bottomless bottle of sake to their meal of hot appetizers and cold sushi. Vocab Lesson Karaage: a Japanese dish prepared by marinating small pieces of meat (typically chicken) in a mix of sauces, dredging them flour, and then deep-frying them until crispy. Hamachi: young yellowtail, popular in sushi. From the Press “At the heart of the menu we find a variety of wonderful rolls, as inventively named as the fanciest cocktails and richly adulterated with such deli-style delights as avocado and cream cheese.” — San Francisco Bay Guardian While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Reenact that scene from Big—but with more cardio—at Pier 39’s Musical Stairs, created by the same artist who was behind the movie’s famed keyboard. After: Have a conversation with the parrots of Telegraph Hill, who can also be found near the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in Upper Fort Mason.
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    1701 Powell St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Chubby Noodle
    Chubby Noodle: A User’s Guide Noodle Bar | “Freestyle” Asian Fusion | Bottomless Dim Sum Brunch | Cold Tea Cocktail | Two Locations Sample Menu: Noodles: chili prawns noodles Cold dish: tuna poke with sesame, soy, and sambal Hot dish: Korean-style pork tacos, which writers for The Infatuation said was “one of the top dishes, taco or otherwise, [they’ve] eaten in SF.” How It All Began Pete Mrabe opened Chubby Noodle as a humble popup inside of Amante, a North Beach bar. It became so popular that Pete—along with restaurateur Nick Floulis—decided to open a second location in the Marina district, this time inside his own brick-and-mortar space that’s just as vibrant as the food. When to Go: weekend brunch (10 a.m.–3 p.m.), when they give each table exactly 90 minutes to enjoy bottomless dim sum dishes and four to five beverages. (Marina) Where to Sit Marina: Grab one of the 7-foot cedar tables that jut out from the kitchen. Here, guests enjoy up-close views of culinary magic while cooks double as servers. North Beach (inside Amante): Claim a stool at one of the high tops near the “Hungry?” neon sign, which hangs above the service counter Chubby Noodle operates from. Pair Your Meal with: the on-tap Cold Tea cocktail, which blends nigori sake, Jardesca ( an aperitif), ginger, serrano, honey, jasmine, and mint tea. (Marina) From the Press “Pete’s menu and flavor profiles span a lot of cuisines: Mandarin, Thai, Vietnamese, Korean, and hey, you’ll find some tortillas on there too. It’s not fusion, it’s more a study in freestyle deliciousness.“ – Tablehopper “If a Japanese izakaya and Chinese dim sum met a family-style party with California wines and hip-hop thrown in for good measure, it might look like Chubby Noodle Marina.” — Zagat Inside Tips Finding the place can be a little tricky, as there’s no name on the Marina building. Just look for a sign featuring a noodle with a face bathing in a bowl of other, less personified noodles. Bring along earbuds if loud music bothers you—the blaring soundtrack at the Marina spot cultivates an energetic vibe with ‘90s hip-hop. If You Can’t Make It, Try This: Pisto’s Tacos (1310 Grant Avenue), co-owner Nick Floulis’ other restaurant that focuses on Mexican street food.
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    570 Green Street
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Miyabi Sushi
    In Focus: Miyabi Sushi Specialty: fresh Japanese delicacies that are creatively plated Definition of miyabi: Japanese for “refined and graceful” Edible homage to the Bay Area: the Jumping Cali Roll, a deep-fried california roll with a spicy sauce Best name for a specialty roll: the Funky Duty Roll—deep-fried asparagus and mango topped with spicy tuna and tobiko Dish for fans of Korean food: bibimbap What to wash everything down with: hot sake How to learn some tricks of the trade: Sit at the wooden sushi bar and keep your eyes peeled.
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    393 Bay St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • The House
    In Focus: The House Open since: 1993 The cuisine: Asian-American fusion Notable dish: grilled sea bass with garlic-ginger soy and noodles Fun fact: Owner Larry Tse is also an actor who appeared in the 2012 film Hemingway & Gellhorn. Proof that the business is in Larry’s blood: His parents owned a Chinese restaurant at Rockaway Beach. It’s where he learned to cook.
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    1230 Grant Avenue
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Urban Curry
    Separated from India and Nepal by half a world, Urban Curry brings highlights of the two countries' revered culinary traditions to the local area. Standing out from from the pack with dishes such as Nepalese momo dumplings and a daily fish curry, The San Francisco Chronicle took notice and hailed the eatery as a restaurant that’s “worth finding." Here, the chefs remain faithful to tradition whenever possible, making paneer cheese in-house, using only halal meats, and importing spices directly from India and Pakistan. Standouts include aromatic curries and tandoor-roasted meats—and yet they don’t rule here exclusively. The menu’s large selection of vegetarian-friendly items incorporate many of the same unmistakable flavors. Once inside the restaurant, it’s easy to forget you’re not actually dining on the other side of the world. Sconces gently light the shadow-dense room, and gilt-framed paintings and white linens make for a vibe that feels lifted from history books.
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    523 Broadway
    San Francisco, CA US
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