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      Genki Crepes

      San Francisco (680 mi)
      Genki Crepes: A User’s Guide 30 Varieties of Crepes | Sweet and Savory Options | Japanese Influences Sample Menu Savory Crepe: Chicken, green onion, cheese, and sweet-chili sauce Ice-Cream Crepe: Chocolate ice cream and cheesecake filling Snack Crepe: Cinnamon, apples, and brown sugar Go Nuts for Nutella: The Nutella snack crepes are among the more crowd-pleasing orders. You can order it with Nutella alone, or choose an add-in such as bananas, almonds, peaches, or marshmallows. Japanese Flair: Crepes might be French, but Genki Crepes draws on Japanese influences as well from filling options such as lychee and red-bean paste to the mini Japanese market attached to the restaurant. While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Hit the links at Presidio Golf Course (300 Finley Road), and reward yourself for a round well played After: Take your crepe for a stroll through the 2,000 varieties of flowers on display at the Conservatory of Flowers (100 John F. Kennedy Drive) greenhouse inside Golden Gate Park. If You Can’t Make It, Try This: San Franciscans aren’t lacking for crepe options. Compare the Genki variety with those at Crepes on Cole (100 Carl Street), Crepe Express (1476 Haight Street), or Crepevine (624 Irving Street).
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      Spruce

      San Francisco (679.7 mi)
      Spruce: A User's Guide Farm-to-Table Cuisine | One Michelin Star | Housemade Charcuterie | 2,000+ Wines | Sophisticated Ambiance Sample Menu Appetizer: selection of charcuterie Entree: grilled rib-eye steak with duck-fat potatoes Dessert: pecan tart with chicory ice cream Cocktail: Greyhound’s Tooth with Bénédictine, Russian Standard vodka, grapefruit, and grapefruit bitters Meet the Chef: Mark Sullivan was named one of America’s Best New Chefs by Food & Wine magazine in 2002, and he currently serves as the executive chef at acclaimed restaurants across California. The Vibe: Spruce is housed in a restored, 1930s-era garage, and its large space features a private dining room, a café, and a restaurant embellished with ostrich-leather chairs. Awards and Acclaim Awarded one star by the Michelin Guide Named one of the country’s best new restaurants by Esquire Praised by Gayot for its “imaginative dishes borne of impeccable pedigree” Vocab Lesson Charcuterie: a meat-centric platter usually consisting of (primarily pork) sausages, pâtés, and other prepared meats. Sweetbreads: mellow-tasting, smooth-textured morsels taken from a lamb or calf’s thymus gland or pancreas. While You're in the Neighborhood Before: Browse high-end men’s and women’s consignment apparel at Goodbyes (3462 Sacramento Street). After: Stop in for a pint and some live music at The Plough and the Stars (116 Clement Street). If You Can’t Make It, Try This: Spruce’s onsite café showcases a casual menu of salads, paninis, and coffees to go.
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      Ella's Restaurant

      San Francisco (679.7 mi)
      A vibrant palette of many organic, local ingredients frosts the paintbrushes of Ella's culinary artists, who transform traditional noshes into the menu's contemporary masterpieces. Amiable servers elicit rapt attention from taste buds with the fried Rocky Jr. chicken breast, Ella's cornbread, and a barrage of flavors with maple butter, jalapeño relish, and romano beans ($19). Ella's burger sings with the tangy serenades of fresh shallots and roasted tomato mayo accompanied by herbed french fries ($12), and pan-seared salmon surges from the depths of Loch Duart to slice through a farro-rich side salad ($21). Diners can also opt for a late breakfast of organic eggs on a sizzling terrain of home fries ($9; add bacon or sausage for $2). The sunny family eatery releases the palatable secrets of its recipes monthly, online and through midnight pirate radio transmissions.
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      Judy's Cafe

      San Francisco (678.8 mi)
      Beneath the yellow tablecloths that brighten Judy’s Café, tables groan under the weight of homestyle breakfast, brunch, and lunch dishes loaded with organic ingredients. The menu of recipes devised by owner Charles Bain’s mother has satisfied the stomachs of San Franciscans, tourists, and celebrities who gaze down from photographs and cryogenic capsules. Breakfast poses a choice of overstuffed three-egg omelets and cut-to-order fruit, while lunch presents appetites with sandwiches of Dutch Crunch bread and nine-grain wheat toast enclosing Cajun, Italian, and American cargo. House-made salsa graces the contents of Mexican wraps before heading off to make an appearance at a high-profile fiesta.
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      Isa

      San Francisco (678.8 mi)
      In the Press Founder Chef Luke Sung nabbed a nomination for the James Beard Foundation's Rising Star Chef Award in 2002 More recently, the eatery ranked #6 on the San Francisco A List's Top French Restaurants Zagat rates the bistro at a solid 24 See more press here About Isa Isa offers French-inspired fare with modern, Californian twists, incorporating ingredients such as fresh avocados, Bartlett pears, and candied sunshine. Diners can pair award-winning dishes with handcrafted soju cocktails, such as the Number Seven – a mix of fresh blackberries, ginger, and champagne – or select wine by the bottle or glass from the restaurant's unique wine list which hails from France, Sonoma Valley, and New Zealand. No matter the selection, Isa prides itself on offering fine dining at bistro-like prices, something that's contributed to multiple awards for the restaurant over its 10 years in business. Chefs at Isa roast racks of lamb with jus and olives, drizzle duck breast in huckleberry sauce, and finish off meals with desserts full of fruit fresh from the farmer's market. Other popular dishes include the sea bass and risotto, which customers can choose to enjoy on the patio, which provides a quiet, backyard-like atmosphere. Sunday through Thursday, Isa hosts a culinary show, preparing a three-course prix fix menu that highlights creative appetizers alongside staple entrees and dessert.
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      Atelier Crenn

      San Francisco (679 mi)
      Atelier Crenn: A User’s Guide Michelin-Rated Restaurant | Seasonal French Cuisine | Locally Sourced Ingredients | Tasting Menus When to Go: The signature tasting menu, which can include as many as 25 courses, is served Tuesday through Saturday. Of course, they also offer a shorter and less expensive 7–10 course tasting menu Tuesday through Thursday. How to Navigate the Menu: Think of it as a poem rather than an outline of dishes and ingredients. For instance, a menu description such as “mellow serenades of colors licorice and orange” is rendered on the plate as sea urchin torchon with caviar and yuzu. Ask your server or a nearby English professor to help you translate. The Gist: The seasonal French dishes here are as far reaching as they are inventive. Chefs combine locally sourced, seasonal produce with a dash of molecular gastronomy and a generous smattering of artful presentation. Who’s Cooking: Versailles-native Dominique Crenn views the culinary arts as exactly that—an art. Her expressive flair has paid off—she won Iron Chef America, earned the title of Esquire’s “chef of the year” in 2008, and secured a place in history as Indonesia’s first-ever female executive chef. Fun Facts: Like many restaurants, Atelier Crenn makes some of its ingredients—such as butter and bread—in-house. But unlike many, Atelier Crenn also makes its own plates, which they use to create singular presentations for each dish. Artistry runs through the Crenn family’s veins—Chef Crenn’s father created the paintings hanging in the dining room. This hereditary trait clearly surfaces in the chef’s dishes and poetic, off-beat menu. Inside Tips: Turn your phone off. Ateller Crenn asks that all patrons enjoy their meal and conversations unhindered by electronic devices. Don’t worry—Instagram will still be there when you leave. If you have dietary restrictions, let your server know. Though there are no guarantees, the kitchen staff will do their best to accommodate you. While You’re In the Neighborhood Before: Pick up a pair of vintage-inspired earrings to debut at dinner at Fawn(3108 Fillmore Street), a quaint women’s boutique. After: Cut a rug or two at Comet Club (3111 Fillmore Street) before commemorating the evening with pictures in their photo booth.
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      Jovino

      San Francisco (679 mi)
      After completing your New Year’s resolution to ventriloquize all of the great passages from Melville's I'm Angry, White Whale in just three days, you deserve a reward. For $15, today's Groupon gets you $35 worth of cozy comfort foods and fine wines at Jovino, a wine bar, coffeehouse, and favorite breakfast spot on Union Street. Your Groupon is redeemable during the normal operating hours of Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. It does not include tax or gratuity.
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      Abigail's Pastry and Fine Foods

      San Francisco (678.9 mi)
      Abigail's Pastry & Fine Foods received the vote for Best Muffins in 2008 by the SF Weekly, more than 130 Yelpers give Abigail's an average of four stars, and Citysearchers give it a perfect five-star average:
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      Chouquet's

      San Francisco (679.4 mi)
      Chef Laurent Guillaume, who has helped open hotels and restaurants in Paris, brings years of culinary expertise to Chouquet’s menu and adorns time-tested continental fare with surprising New World elements. Attentive servers emerge from the kitchen carrying escargot and niçoise salads, cruising past sleek stools at a bar accented by swirls of natural wood grain and designed by Dominique Maxime Genauzeau. On the patio, diners soak up the sun or choose least-favorite clouds for a sky writer to edit out. The dining room's sand-hued walls and burnt-orange accents resound with the sounds of glasses clinking together, bearing more than 70 wines from Europe, South America, and the Pacific Northwest and a rotating selection of draft beers from France and the United States.
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      Central Coffee Tea and Spice

      San Francisco (680.6 mi)
      Central Coffee Tea and Spice: A User’s Guide Espresso-Focused Drink Menu | Daily Soup Specials | Bagels and Pastries | Hearty Café Food | Dog-Friendly Patio Sample Menu Drink: 16-ounce double latte For breakfast: the lox special—fresh salmon, a toasted bagel, cream cheese, red onions, and capers For lunch: spinach-pesto quiche and a cup of the day’s soup For dinner: vegetable lasagna and a side salad While You’re Waiting: Look around at the blue, orange, and yellow walls of the cozy café, where framed photos depict coffee farmers and other coffee-related imagery. The café also posts fliers for local events and concerts. Inside Tips If you like a particular blend, you can take it home. The café sells beans by the pound and half-pound. Seating is limited, so you might be asked to share a table. Each entree comes with a baguette and either soup or a side salad. You can bring your own mug and receive a discount. Take the dog along and relax out on the patio, a perfect spot for pup- and people-watching. While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Learn to sew, craft leather jewelry, or make pickled veggies at Workshop (1798 McAllister Street). After: Shop for art, retro toys, and kitschy T-shirts at Super7 (1427 Haight Street). If You Can’t Make It, Try This: Pedal over to Mojo Bicycle Café (639 Divisadero Street).
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      Parada 22

      San Francisco (681 mi)
      Parada 22: A User’s Guide Puerto Rican Cuisine | Pitchers of Sangria | Casual, Intimate Space Sample Menu Entree: roasted pork marinated with garlic, oregano, and sofrito Dessert: coconut flan Beverage: sangria Behind the Name: Parada 22 is a bus stop in San Juan, the hometown of consulting chef Gloria Pinette. When to Go: Stop by during happy hour (Monday–Thursday from 4–6 p.m.) for discounts on beers, mixed platters, and pitchers of sangria. Inside Tip: The restaurant only has 10 tables and doesn’t accept reservations. To avoid long waits, place your order online before arriving. Vocab Lesson Picadillo: a Latin American take on hash that typically blends ground beef, tomatoes, and various vegetables and spices. Tostones: fried slices of unripe plantain; a common side dish in Latin America. While You're in the Neighborhood Before: Browse retro fashions at La Rosa Vintage (1711 Haight Street)—rumored to be burlesque dancer Dita Von Teese’s favorite vintage shop. After: Sip on a cocktail surrounded by Persian-inspired murals at Zam Zam (1633 Haight Street).
      Happy Hour

      Marengo on Union

      San Francisco (679 mi)
      The Three Faces of Marengo on Union Gourmet Sliders A dozen sliders form the bulk of the modest menu at Marengo on Union. There’s the classic All-American (with cheddar, tomato, and special sauce), but Chef Rayna Toomajian’s creativity really shines through in her more unusual combinations, like the Gobbler: a turkey patty smothered in provolone and basil-pesto aioli. Although some sliders—like the Shrimp Po’ Boy with Tabasco aioli—are distinctly American, Chef Rayna also incorporates global flavors into the Báhn Mì and Italian-inspired Meatball sliders. Local and Organic Ingredients A road trip to any of Marengo’s suppliers wouldn’t take long. The shredded pork inside the Porky’s slider came from Bailey-Long Family Farms in California’s Central Valley, and the ground lamb in the Starling slider started out at Pozzi Ranch in Northern California. Chef Rayna sources organic ingredients whenever possible, and she changes her menu with the seasons to showcase the freshest possible produce. Worldly Whiskeys and Wines Like the food menu, Marengo’s drink list spotlights plenty of local flavors, from the wines of Napa and Anderson Valleys to whiskeys distilled right in the Bay Area. But both collections branch out as well, featuring a mix of European and South American wines and a long list of Kentucky bourbons and single malts squeezed fresh from the mossy moors of Scotland. The whiskeys find their way into craft cocktails such as the BLT, made with Bulleit, lemon, and tonic.
      Happy Hour

      Park Chow

      San Francisco (681.3 mi)
      Plenty of international influences show up on Park Chow’s self-described “All-American” menu. Patrons can twirl their fork in plates of Thai noodles with chicken and peanuts, or they can dig into old-fashioned spaghetti and meatballs. For weekday breakfast or weekend brunch, they might savor french toast, Irish oatmeal, or huevos rancheros. No matter the dish, Chow harvests their ingredients from local sources: free-range chicken and organic beef come from nearby farms, the seafood is always wild, and desserts are baked fresh daily. Even the apple, orange, and grapefruit juices are pressed to order, though time constraints prevent the restaurant from growing the fruit while you wait.
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      i-Crepe

      San Francisco (680.3 mi)
      Everything that comes out of i-Crepe’s kitchen is light and delectable. The eatery’s airy crepes are spread with thin smears of Nutella and layered with bananas, scoops of gelato are surrounded by a golden halo of mangoes and berries, and savory sandwiches are filled with ingredients such as grilled chicken. Gelato can also be served outside of crepes, with staff arranging the slowly melting scoops in a waffle cone topped with a dollop of whipped cream, pureeing them for a strawberry sundae smoothie, or blending them with milk for a gelato frappe. Baristas create drinks to pair with these treats, such as honey earl grey tea with bubble tea pearls and freshly-made green tea topped with salty cream.
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      Irving Street Cafe

      San Francisco (681.3 mi)
      Naturally, two dishes in particular feature prominently at Naan N Curry. Eight types of naan, stuffed with everything from potatoes to cheese, emerge from the kitchen along with seafood, chicken, lamb, and vegetarian curries. There are plenty of tandoori dishes as well, including chicken tikka kebabs and marinated lamb chops. To extend their meal, diners can order chai tea and rice pudding for dessert or simply figure out a way to smuggle a sleeping bag into the pantry.
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      Magnolia Pub and Brewery

      San Francisco (680.9 mi)
      Magnolia Gastropub & Brewery: A User’s Guide Housemade Craft Beers | Seasonal, Local Pub Eats | Weekend Brunch | Growlers to Go Sample Menu Snack: scotch quail eggs with beer-mustard aioli Entree: beer-brined pork chop with heirloom runner beans and baby kale Dessert: float with Humphry Slocombe Stout ice cream and housemade root beer What to Drink: You can’t go wrong by sampling anything from the current draft list, which Zagat called one of the most “awesomely-curated” beer lists in the city. The Vibe: When Imbibe magazine’s editors selected Magnolia as one of their 75 favorite breweries in 2014, owner Dave McLean told an interviewer that he wants to replicate the “comfortable and convivial atmosphere of a true ‘public house’,” complete with pints, brewery tours, and growlers to go. Inside Tip: Magnolia doesn’t accept reservations. So if you want to get a seat without long waits, avoid peak dining hours. If You Can’t Make It, Try This: Grab a whiskey and some stick-to-your-ribs barbecue at Magnolia’s sister restaurant, Smokestack at Magnolia Brewing Co. (2505 3rd Street).
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      Fillmore's Fine Foods

      San Francisco (679.8 mi)
      Molten dark chocolate. Long-stemmed never-frozen strawberries. A dusting of coconut flakes. At HerBerries, confectioners put thousands of fresh berries through this process, alternating between types of chocolate and toppings such as sprinkles, candy bars, and nuts. Their more gourmet varieties call for rum or tequila-infused berries, coffee or cheesecake flavors, and sprinkles and edible glitters customized to match the colors of a wedding party or favorite supernova.
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      Bistro Unique

      San Francisco (679 mi)
      Softly flickering candles light the red booths and white-cloth tables at Bistro Unique SF, while the attentive wait staff rolls out traditional French appetizers of butter-and-garlic-bathed escargot or flavorful French cheeses. For entrees, rich bouillabaisse soups reel fresh catches of monkfish, calamari, and scallops into a saffron broth, and the cassoulet's white-bean stew fills palates with flavors of duck confit and garlic toulouse sausage. For brunch, diners can opt for eggs benedict with rich hollandaise sauce or the savory crepe paysanne with chicken, mushrooms, and gravy to pair with bottomless mimosa flutes or clarinets filled with coffee.
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      Nopa

      San Francisco (680.6 mi)
      Nopa: A User's Guide Rustic Mediterranean Food | Local and Organic Ingredients | Wood-Fired Oven | Global Cocktails | Open Kitchen Sample Menu Snack: warm goat cheese with pickled beets and crostini Entree: grass-fed hamburger with pickled onions and french fries Entree (vegetarian): Moroccan vegetable tagine with almonds and yogurt Dessert: meyer-lemon tart with brown-butter ice cream and candied sage What to Drink: Nopa's list of cocktails spans the globe, featuring exotic spirits such as Nicaraguan Flor de Caña and Scottish Glenkinchie and more than 20 housemade bitters. There's also a collection of European vintages housed in a rather unique wine cellar—an old, repurposed bank vault. Where to Sit: Rub elbows with regulars at a large communal table, where you can watch chefs stoke the flames of a wood-burning oven in the open kitchen. When to Go: Nopa's kitchen stays open later than most—until 1 a.m.—making it the go-to place for anyone hungry after a night out. While You're Waiting Check out the mural by local artist Brian Barneclo on the wall. Listen for the honeybees buzzing on the roof. Nopa's owner, Jeff Hanak, tends to a couple hives up there, harvesting the bees' floral honey for a handful of his restaurant's recipes. While You're in the Neighborhood Shop: Peruse handmade, beautiful, and otherwise unique jewelry, stationery, and accessories at Rare Device (600 Divisadero Street). Move: Go for a run or soak up some prime city views at Alamo Square Park (corner of Hayes Street and Steiner Street). If You Can’t Make It, Try This: Nopa's sister restaurant, Nopalito (306 Broderick Street), puts a local, sustainable twist on traditional Mexican cuisine.
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      Zazie

      San Francisco (681.3 mi)
      Zazie’s moniker comes from a ‘60s-era French film starring a pint-sized heroine of the same name. In an interview with Check, Please!, owner Jennifer Piallat describes mischievous Zazie as a French Shirley Temple—that is, one who drinks, swears, and smokes. With a mascot like that, perhaps it's surprising what type of people the French bistro attracts. It’s mostly families and regulars (about 80% by Jennifer’s estimation), a fact Jennifer credits to her staff, who form a rapport with the regulars by shouting the name of their own favorite board game every few minutes. Of course, Zazie didn’t score a stellar Zagat rating on its service alone. Critics and customers delight in the brunch menu, which is filled with treats such as house-made cream cheese coffee cake, pancakes, eggs, and, of course, French toast. But Jennifer prefers dinner, when chefs prepare grilled pork chops with Riesling sauce and casseroles of crispy duck leg and French sausages. Experience these dishes outside on the garden patio or in a dining room where vintage posters embellish exposed brick walls.
      Monday Dog Night

      Gussie's Chicken and Waffles

      San Francisco (680.1 mi)
      Gussie's Chicken & Waffles focuses on the flavors of the American South, not the Caribbean, but owner Michele Wilson and manager Pia Harris have a deep love for Jamaican culture and music. In 2011, they gathered a group of their neighbors in the Fillmore to kick off the first San Francisco Reggae Festival, a free afternoon of locally and internationally sourced concerts, booths showcasing local food vendors and artists, and children’s activities such as games and advanced relaxing lessons. While the pulse of classic reggae carries through the fest, lineups nod to modern developments in Jamaica and the Bay Area alike by also booking DJs and hip-hop-influenced performers.
      Happy Hour
      Live Music Specials

      Bushi-tei

      San Francisco (679.8 mi)
      If two heads are better than one, then two cuisine-noggins fused into one restaurant-body are better than one. Support admixed eateries and your local thesaurus with today’s Groupon: for $20, you’ll get $40 worth of delicious French-Japanese fusion fare for lunch or dinner at Bushi-Tei, an epicurean hybrid that helps you to expand your cultural palate. 1905: Einstein's famous equation, E = mc2, hypothesizes a fusion-style reaction, while Einstein himself hypothesizes a romance between Meg Ryan and Tim Robbins. 1946: Designer bombs tested at Bikini Atoll create a variety of decorative cloud shapes, including beach ball, dolphin, and silhouette of the United States. 1978: Attempts to use nuclear fusion to prevent magician David Copperfield from appearing on TV are largely successful. 2010: Simultaneous, worldwide experiments with nuclear fusion result in the renewed popularity of player pianos and the transformation of friendly cats into gigantic-instrument-of-mayhem cats.
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      La Folie

      San Francisco (679 mi)
      The ingredients for La Folie’s contemporary French dishes may come from local farms, but its chef hails from much further away—Lyon, France, to be exact. It’s here where Chef Roland Passot honed his culinary skills, most notably as the assistant sous-chef for Michelin star-rated Jean Paul Lacombe. He then showed off his talents in Chicago and Dallas, cooking for the likes of Prince Charles and Bob Hope, before finally opening La Folie with his wife in 1988. The restaurant has been a hit with diners and critics alike, even earning a Michelin star of its own in 2013. The contemporary French menu favors seasonal ingredients and unlikely pairings—such as Dungeness crab salad served atop coconut carrot panna cotta. The desserts are equally inventive, with both huckleberries and peaches receiving the baked Alaska treatment. Unwind before or after a meal inside the sleek lounge, where a metallic chandelier casts a warm glow over the tin ceiling and napoleon blue walls. While lazing in crisp white lounge seats or socializing at the tiled bar, guest may nibble on a more casual menu of truffled popcorn, house-cured salmon lollipops, and artisan cheese. The bar staff pours global wines and mixes up classic cocktails—such as the Bees Knees’ blend of Tanqueray gin, honey water, and lemon.
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      Polkers Gourmet Burgers

      San Francisco (679 mi)
      When it opened in 1993, Polkers Restaurant—then known as Polkers Gourmet Burgers—focused exclusively on burgers crafted from fresh, local ingredients. Still a mainstay at Polkers, each burger builds from a patty of corn-fed Angus beef, which Executive Chef Munther Massarweh crowns with toppings such as housemade barbecue sauce and extra-sharp Wisconsin cheddar. Besides standard-sized beef burgers, Chef Munther treats smaller appetites and hungry dolls to sliders of ahi tuna with spicy sriracha aioli and barbecue pork with blue-cheese slaw. But since 2013, the focus of the newly rechristened Polkers Restaurant has widened to include gourmet bistro and comfort food. New entrees include pan-seared salmon steaks and towers of oven-roasted veggies coated with an aged-balsamic glaze. Local greens star in Chef Munther's five well-crafted salads, which incorporate ingredients such as housemade caesar dressing and jalapeño cream.
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      Le Petit Marchet

      San Francisco (679.3 mi)
      Lacy script sprawls across the red, green, and yellow awning that welcomes diners into Le Petit Marchet until 3 a.m. Chefs toil in the kitchen to craft a menu that bridges cultural gaps with Mediterranean dishes, pizzas, bagel sandwiches, and plenty of suspension cables. Baba gannouj and falafel plates rub elbows with sandwiches of Boar's Head Salsalito roast turkey breast and buffalo chicken. The Middle East Favorite pizza transports its olives and feta cheese to American tongues, and a jaw-dropping selection of chips and candy bars imported from Europe grants diners the temporary ability to list the succession of Holy Roman emperors.
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      Buena Vista Cafe

      San Francisco (678.4 mi)
      The Buena Vista Cafe: A User’s Guide Historic Irish Coffee | Aged Cream | All-Day Breakfast | Cable Car Access | Well Bar Spirits Sample Menu Breakfast (served all day): dungeness crab omelet Side: corn beef hash Sandwich:fFrench dip with au jus Drink: Irish coffee A Sip of History: When it opened in 1916, Buena Vista was a saloon. It wouldn’t become a true cafe unti travel writer Stanton Delaplane drank some Irish coffee at Ireland’s Shannon Airport. He was hooked, and Mr. Delaplane worked with Buena Vista’s owners to start serving Irish coffee in 1952. According to the cafe’s owners, they were the first to serve the beverage in the United States, and their recipe hasn’t changed since—including cream that’s aged at least 48 hours. The Ingredients: Chefs cook breakfast with cage-free eggs, and baristas source organic coffee from Peerless Coffee & Tea. Behind the Bar: Eight well drinks, including Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey. While You’re Waiting Look to the window: Cable cars travel right by the cafe Look to the bar: In a stunning feat, bartenders might pour up to 10 Irish coffees at once Inside Tips Don’t worry about parking—the Hyde Street Cable car will take you right to Irish coffee's doorstep. The cafe is narrow and often crowded, so don’t be surprised if you don’t get much elbow room. Fun Facts In 2008, bartenders here mixed a 12-gallon Irish coffee in an attempt to get into the Guinness Book of World Records. Frommer’s notes that The Buena Vista Cafe has poured more Irish coffees than anywhere else in the world. While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Pick up a pair of shoes, a scented candle, or a piece of unexpected home decor at Jackson & Polk (900 N Pointe, Ste E206). After: View (and possibly buy) the paintings at Art Attack SF (2722A Hyde St). If You Can’t Make It, Try This: Fiddler's Green (1333 Columbus Ave), a nearby Irish pub.
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      L'Ardoise

      San Francisco (681.2 mi)
      L'Ardoise Bistro: A User’s Guide French Bistro Food | Charming Atmosphere | French Wine List Sample Menu Appetizer: tiger-prawn ravioli with sauce vierge and fresh herbs Entree: Black Angus hanger steak with pommes frites Dessert: apple tarte tatin Meet the Chef: Chef Thierry Clement grew up in France, where he learned to appreciate the region’s fresh, simply prepared food. This passion propelled him into a career as a chef, working at restaurants with Michelin stars and James Beard nominations before opening up L'Ardoise Bistro. The Vibe: The bistro exudes Parisian charm. Diners are surrounded by dark woods, deep-red walls, and floral carpets flecked with red and gold. According to the San Francisco Bay Guardian, “It would not be difficult to imagine Proust in the next room, scribbling away.” While You’re Waiting: Peep through the tiny kitchen window. You might be able to spot Chef Clement inside, putting the finishing touches on your meal. Vocab Lesson L'Ardoise: French for “chalkboard.” Tarte tatin: an upside-down French dessert that features fruit—usually apples—caramelized in butter and sugar.
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      FRJTZ

      San Francisco (680.5 mi)
      French fries are traditionally a side dish, but not at Frjtz. Here, hand-cut, twice-fried pomme frites are a main event, served alongside 20-plus inventive dipping sauces, such as balsamic mayo and habanero-cranberry ketchup. But Frjtz's culinary mastermind, Santiago Rodriguez, doesn't merely craft fries and sauces. His extensive menu encompasses everything from breaded Belgian mussels served by the pound to burgers crowned with lemon-saffron aioli. On the sweeter side, he specializes in two of Belgian's most lauded desserts: crepes and waffles. The former he fills with fixings such as strawberries and wild-berry coulis, while atop the latter he piles caramelized pears and toasted almonds. There are even savory riffs on each, such as waffles crowned with crab cakes and hollandaise, which, if doused in milk, becomes a complete breakfast. Along with wine and cocktails, Santiago complements his hearty feasts with four Belgian beers on tap, plus many more by the bottle.
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      Tommy's Joynt

      San Francisco (679.8 mi)
      Tommy's Joynt: A User’s Guide Hand-Carved Meats | 100+ International Beers | Hofbrau-Style Service | Featured on Food Network | Eclectic Atmosphere Sample Menu Soup: buffalo stew Sandwich: house-roasted turkey on a sourdough roll Side: hickory baked beans Dessert: apple pie The History: Tommy Harris, a local radio personality, opened up Tommy's Joynt along with members of the Veprin and Pollack families in 1947. Those same families still own the place, and many of their staffers have been working here for more than 20 years. The Vibe: Frommer’s sums up the decor perfectly, saying the restaurant looks like “a Buffalo Bill museum that imploded.” Old stained-glass lights hang from the ceiling, and the walls brim with antique firearms and taxidermy. Press and Praise SF Weekly named it the Best Place to Drink Around the Globe in 2010. Guy Fieri profiled the restaurant on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. While You’re Waiting: Watch the deli counter, where the staff puts on quite a show. They slice their house-cooked meats—including whole turkeys—fresh with every order. Inside Tips Bring cash. They don’t accept credit cards. Know what you want. The staff likes things to move fast, and they prefer that customers order quickly once they get to the counter. Don’t order lettuce on your sandwich. The food here is meant to showcase meat in its simplest form. Vocab Lesson Hofbrau: German term for a casual, cafeteria-style restaurant or tavern While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Explore the collection of surrealist and abstract art installations at Shooting Gallery (886 Geary Street). After: Give an old piece of jewelry a new life at Mureta’s Antiques (2418 Fillmore Street).
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