Restaurants in San Juan Capistrano

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From inside The Vintage Steakhouse, it would be easy to pretend that a passenger on the trains passing just outside the window is engrossed in a pristine early edition of The Sun Also Rises, smoke swirling off the Chesterfield perched absentmindedly between his fingers. Without much effort, you might conjure a woman in the bar car, gratefully sipping a Southside and sending up a wordless celebration of the reversal of Prohibition.

That?s because restaurant resides inside the historic Capistrano Depot, which, despite its 1894 build date, bears an unmistakably art-deco vibe evocative of the 1920s or ?30s. A trio of arched windows is the focal point of the main dining room; when trains aren?t sliding past their decoratively gridded glass, diners can peek through bougainvillea and willow trees to the 200-year-old adobes planted behind them. Inside, knotted wood planks run across the 18-foot ceilings, a near match to the hardwood floors glistening beneath.

A smaller dining room sits in the adjoining Dining Car, a fully restored 1927 Pullman train car upholstered in warm reds and golds. Candlelit tables for two line each side of the car, under which couples? intertwined feet rest softly upon the regally patterned carpet. The ambience is a bit more social in the Chef?s Alley room, an 1887 freight house with its own cocktail bar and more contemporary d?cor.

No matter where parties choose to dine, they?re presented with a thoughtful menu of hand-cut steaks and seafood accented with local, organic produce. The chef prepares all dishes over an open-flame mesquite grill, giving everything a juicy, so-that?s-what-fire-tastes-like flavor. A chef?s selection of veggies and the patron?s choice of potato accompany the entrees, which range from filet mignon in a cabernet demi-glace to prawns saut?ed in a sauvignon-blanc sauce.

These rich sauces pair perfectly with the more than 150 varietals that populate the restaurant?s wine list. Though heavy on French and Californian selections, the temperature-controlled wine cellar also has a few Spanish, Australian, and Italian bottles tucked away. Plus, the cellar stores a few cases of bubbly for the prix-fixe Sunday brunch?s bottomless champagne special, ensuring a festive follow-up to the smooth live jazz that plays every Friday and Saturday night.

26701 Verdugo Street
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
US

Culinary school wasn’t enough of a learning experience for Hany Fadda. During the summers between his classical training at the California Culinary Academy, Hany traveled extensively throughout the Mediterranean and the Middle East. These experiences heavily influence the cuisine that he creates as the head chef of Tannins Restaurant and Wine Bar, although he also celebrates Orange County by featuring an extensive wine list that includes more than 40 different local wines by the glass.

These wines complement the contemporary bistro-style cuisine. Italian cuisine appears most prominently on the menus, and the chefs strive for authenticity by importing prosciutto and hand-making their own meatballs in-house. In addition to the assorted pasta dishes, the menus also feature a number of pizzas with toppings that include everything from sausage and roasted red peppers to roma tomatoes and sweet basil. Desserts such as traditional Sicilian cannoli or tiramisu provide a fitting coda to the casually refined meals.

The eatery’s dining room embraces a more classical elegance, with silver candelabras on several of the linen-draped tables. High ceilings and archways between rooms contribute to this vaguely regal setting, as do the thrones that surround each table.

27211 Ortega Hwy
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
US

When Father Lasuen founded Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1775, he created the 7th of modern California's 21 missions, which were intended to serve as epicenters of Christianity and Spanish culture in the New World. The mission system fell into disarray and disrepair during the war for Mexican independence and the Mexican-American War, but San Juan Capistrano remains, standing as a relic of that era and a testament to California's historical mélange of European and Native American cultures.

The mission invites visitors to learn more about the region’s history by exploring 10 acres of preserved adobe architecture, fountains, and gardens. Audio tours give groups a unique insight into the site's stories, and rotating exhibits feature artwork as well as historical and religious artifacts from San Juan Capistrano. Hands-on activities allow guests to recreate the experience of centuries-old mission life by making adobe bricks, panning for gold, or connecting computers to dial-up modems.

26801 Ortega Highway
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
US

Simply Fondue's intimate, chandelier-lit dining room plays host to tabletop pots that bubble with warm imported cheeses, oils, and broths. The restaurant's cheese fondues from Switzerland, the Mediterranean, and England allow diners to taste the world's flavors without having to lick every country's flag. The eatery also simmers traditional canola and broth fondue using individual "fondue grills," which sear each morsel for lighter munching. For each entree, chefs pair simmering helpings with platters of meat, seafood, or veggies, all of which can be altered upon request.

Many meals conclude with chocolate fondue, which features an impressive coterie of sweets such as pound cake, triple-chunk brownies, peanut-butter balls, and fresh pineapple chunks plucked from the hats of local conga dancers. The dining experience stays casual throughout with plush red booths and upholstered bar stools set against textured stone walls.

31761 Camino Capistrano
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
US

Boasting an eclectic menu, Red Velvet serves flavorful Far East dishes in a casual, inviting atmosphere. Inaugurate an epicurean expedition with Thai-style chicken-satay skewers ($3.95 for two pieces) or jasmine sizzling-rice soup ($6.95). Fork wielders can point prongs toward the Chinese chopped chicken salad ($6.45) or duel with the spears of the asparagus shrimp ($10.95). Complete your taste trek with sweet banana xangos, a caramel-banana cheesecake that impersonates a spring roll, cloaks itself in cinnamon sugar, and stages a rendezvous with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The menu also includes an expansive selection of organic loose-leaf teas imported from China ($2.95 per cup).

31654 Rancho Viejo Rd
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
US

Skimmer's beguiles skeptical taste buds with fresh ingredients, artisan breads, and piping-hot paninis. All paninis are served on sourdough bread filled with Boar's Head meats, and grilled on a cast-iron panini press without oil or butter. Hot-sauce connoisseurs can try the "Screaming! Buffalo Chicken" panini ($7.99), packed with buffalo chicken, Tabasco mayo, and Skimmer's own hot-wing sauce, so hot and spicy it smokes hummingbirds out of their cocoons. In between panini savorings, munch on Skimmer's crouton fries ($2.99), served with a chipotle dipping sauce. Salad scarfers get their fill with the big city chef salad ($9.25), with bacon, ham, and turkey politely mingling with veggies, which tops the salad menu. Mission Viejo diners can complete meals with milky house-made Italian gelato, whipped up to a thick, delectable state, just like Italy itself.

31451 Rancho Viejo Rd
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
US