Charity & Grassroots in Seattle

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Northwest Harvest took root more than four decades ago when a group of community leaders got together to empower underserved people. The group learned that hunger was one of the largest causes for concern in Seattle and beyond. As the years passed, Northwest Harvest's leaders found that it was more than the underserved populations who experienced food insecurity, and in fact many out-of-work middle-class families were in the same situation. So they worked to establish a partnership network of more than 325 food banks and meal programs to help extend their reach and supply nutritious food to people across the state.

Today Northwest Harvest focuses on delivering healthful meals and teaching families about nutrition while reducing overall hunger in a way that respects individual dignity. With the organization's partnership network, thousands of volunteers prepare more than 1.6 million healthful meals every month with adequate servings of fruit and vegetables. Furthermore, the distribution centers are spaced across the region to ensure rural and urban communities have an equal access to food.

711 Cherry St
Seattle,
WA
US

Tucked into a two-story loft space, Mind Unwind is both an art gallery and a happening events space. Visitors can peruse the rotating art that cascades across the long stretch of walls or join classes such as cartooning, painting, or Paint It Up, which is hosted at local bars. Though only recently established, Mind Unwind holds fast to its vision of becoming a collective for local artists, a community outreach organization, and a space for all types of performances. A portion of all Mind Unwind event proceeds go to a non-profit that aims to reinstate art-education in schools.

2206A California Ave SW
Seattle,
WA
US

While it?s impossible to know what Seattle?s skyline will look like in the future, the Seattle Architecture Foundation hopes that citizens at least have some input and interest in the developments. To do this, the organization arranges a slew of architecture- and design-related walking tours, lectures, youth workshops, and volunteer opportunities throughout the city. Ideally, the activities help people become more informed and enthusiastic about great design and more willing to become involved when the city finally launches into space.

1333 5th Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

The museum was started in 2005 in Shoreline when the lab relocated from the University of Washington. The lab has moved to Georgetown and the volunteers doing the work want to share it with the world. News of the LIFESUIT Robotic Exoskeleton has saved lives already by giving hope to millions of paralyzed people.

6266 13th Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

Lilting voices from two violins and a harpsichord etch out the notes of Purcell’s Pavan in B-flat Major, filling a small room with layered textures and slowly unfolding emotions. The three performers lean into their instruments, their private concert as intimate as it would have been if performed in the 17th century. This is what the Salish Sea Players create at each of their concerts: unexpected music in unexpected venues. Linda Melsted and Olga Hauptman on baroque violins and Fred Hauptman on the harpsichord perform in retirement, memory-care, and long-term-care facilities for people who are unable to attend traditional venues due to a lack of mobility or resources.

Before each concert, the trio greets audience members individually and answers questions about the historical instruments they use and the style of music they play. Their instruments reflect what would have been used historically: antique bows, strings made of unwound gut, and copies of original scores. Then they fill the air with the sounds of Handel, Mazas, Sousa, or Bartok, the sweet music combining with the historical approach to create an intriguing atmosphere and educational moment for the audience to share together.

See how Groupon helps you discover local causes and lend a helping hand at the Groupon Grassroots blog.

1207 NE 103rd Street
Seattle,
WA
US

One day when she was leaving the Centerstone office in downtown Seattle, CEO Andrea Caupain met a homeless man outside the building. She stopped to talk to him and he explained that he couldn?t eat the food he had just picked up from the food bank. He had a week?s worth of fresh food, but no pot to cook it in. So, the next day she brought him a pot from home that he could use to cook his meals with from then on. This interaction reflects the core of Centerstone?s mission: to be a lifeline in the community.

Centerstone began in the '60s as part of the War on Poverty movement. Along with 29 other community action agencies formed in the state, it advocated for low-income individuals? rights in legislation and provided them with daily necessities through on-the-ground programs. Over the years it evolved and began offering services to anyone in need. Today, Centerstone provides energy, housing, and food assistance for families, seniors, immigrants, and people with disabilities who are having financial difficulties. Centerstone pays bills so people can keep their heat on in the winter, provides deposits for people trying to obtain a new apartment, and distributes food at a local food bank. Beyond helping clients meet their basic needs, Centerstone also teaches them life and money management skills.

722 18th Ave
Seattle,
WA
US