Museums in Pioneer Square

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The Whitney's Curate Your Own Membership program is an innovative new approach to museum membership, allowing members-to-be to choose their own customized package of benefits. Each member gets a set of core benefits that include unlimited free admission, exclusive exhibition access, discounts, and more. From there, Whitney members can curate their own gallery of perks, choosing from a series of add-ons—the Social, Insider, Learning, Family, or Philanthropy series. Basic memberships include one series add-on, but this deal includes two series add-ons with either option.

1300 1st Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

Presented as a gift to Seattle residents from Charles and Emma Frye, two philanthropic Seattleites, the Frye Art Museum in the First Hill neighborhood is lean and low when viewed from the street. The building’s stark mid-century concrete profile belies the rich collection of artwork and airy galleries held inside. Opened in 1952 as a home for the couple’s private collection of 232 paintings, entrance is free in perpetuity for Seattle residents. And while the Frye founding collection focuses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century paintings, visiting exhibitions have expanded this content and routinely feature contemporary artists such as Mark Mitchell, Joshua Kohl, Jason Hirata, Henry Darger and Helmi Juvonen, among others. The museum also hosts a gift shop and small cafe with outdoor seating in warm months, but is closed on Mondays.

704 Terry Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

The 90-minute stroll through Seattle’s micro-China starts at the Chinatown-International District museum. A friendly and engaging guide leads tours through authentic Asian markets, whirling with bustling merchants, brightly colored goods, and savory smells of incense or freshly roasted duck. As you learn the history and significance of historical landmarks, the diverse languages of the city's Asian community comingle melodiously in the air, and the spirit of a 7,000-year-old culture flits through the incomparable Seattle neighborhood like a flutterbug in a bag of cotton balls.

719 S King St
Seattle,
WA
US

If the walls of the Moore Theatre could talk, they would probably brag, and with plenty of reason. Part of the National Register of Historic Places, the Moore Theatre has thrived as Seattle's oldest-running entertainment venue since 1907. Behind its quaint exterior, flanked with Italian and Byzantine terracotta details, lies a playhouse of grandiose opulence and architectural marvel. Inside, a grand lobby of marble, onyx, and mosaic flooring leads to an auditorium where ceiling frescos of cream and gold lord over 1,400 seats. In its burgeoning years, the venue played host to performances by Ethel Barrymore, the Marx Brothers, and Harry Houdini, becoming a beacon for vaudeville's best and a vacation home for audiences during the Great Depression. Lately, the venue has welcomed a broad variety of community-based lectures, beauty pageants, and dance troupes. Its glimmering interiors have also added eye candy to many videos from rock bands such as Wilco, Alice in Chains, and Pearl Jam, and comedians such as Wanda Sykes and Patton Oswalt.

1932 2nd Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

The craft masters at Seattle Glassblowing Studio & Gallery guide pupils to artistic bliss by expounding on a spectrum of steps needed to create intricate pieces. Whether joining 10?25 fellow artisans in a group workshop or forming a clique in a one- to three-person private class, students turn provided materials into bowls, cups, and decorative piles of glass shards. Professional glass wielders safely impart etiquette and basic techniques such as gathering glass on a rod and shaping it into colorful geometric forms.

The shop's instructors also offer their own artistic services, including custom commissions such as functional lighting and installation pieces. Damaged glass heirlooms undergo repairs in the cold-working shop, where artisans restore shattered pieces and polish away dullness left behind by covetous pawing.

2227 5th Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

EMP Museum is a tribute to cultural icons as well as a breeding ground for the next generation of musicians and societal shapers. Here, attendees don?t just stand before exhibits that explore Jimi Hendrix and The Rolling Stones, but throw down their own musical chops in interactive exhibits such as Sound Lab, where they riff on an electric guitar, bang on drums, and tweak acoustics behind a mixing console. On Stage also gets guests to grip instruments, but under the hot lights of the stage, where they can pretend to entertain legions of fans or accompany their nephew?s birthday party.

The museum also curates rotating exhibits that celebrate modern cultural achievements. These have showcased the impact of Nirvana?s career alongside historic artifacts as diverse as Hendrix?s Stratocaster from Woodstock and Neo?s black futuristic coat from Matrix Reloaded. As home to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, the museum also spotlights luminaries such as Ray Bradbury and Steven Spielberg, who have shaped a generation?s imagination while warning people about the perils of suppressing ingenuity, ideas, and viewpoints.

All of the educational programming and special events unfold inside the architectural jewel that is the EMP Museum. Designed by Frank O. Gehry, the building?s 3,000 stainless-steel panels shimmer and seemingly swing through the air. This fluidity, which can alter its appearance depending on the time of day and light conditions, is about ?reminding audiences that music and culture is constantly evolving,? as the museum?s website states.

325 5th Ave N
Seattle,
WA
US