Movies in Portage Bay


Select Local Merchants

  • Varsity Theatre
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    4329 University Way
    Seattle, WA US
  • Grand Illusion Cinema
    By the Numbers: Grand Illusion Cinema 1968—the year it opened inside a repurposed dentist’s office 1997—the year it was taken over by the Northwest Film Forum 2004—when it became an independent nonprofit organization 70 seats 5 levels of theater membership 16mm and 35mm film-projection capabilities (in addition to digital) 5.1 surround sound 0 big-budget studio pictures—Grand Illusion soley focuses on independent, foreign, and art house productions
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    1403 NE 50th St
    Seattle, WA US
  • Guild 45th Theatre
    Since the silver age of motion pictures (1974 to be exact) Landmark Theatres have been taking movie lovers on numerous documentary odysseys and flights of story-telling fancy. Today, they're the biggest movie theatre franchise that puts a large focus on marketing independent films. Still, that doesn't mean you won't also see the occasional foreign film, thought-provoking Hollywood hit or a 3-D extravaganza. The chain often features locations with gourmet concession items, avant-garde films of all genres and in-theatre sales of DVDs, books and CDs. With 58 theatres and a total of 272 screens it’s safe to say most serious movie lovers can find a theater nearby.
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    2115 N 45th St
    Seattle, WA US
  • Harvard Exit Theatre
    Built in 1925, converted into a movie house in 1968 and added to the expanding Landmark Theatre chain in 1979, the two-screen Harvard Exit Theatre sits at the north edge of Capitol Hill’s business district. Offering a lobby that feels more like a living room, complete with fireplace, piano and comfortable sofas and chairs, the Harvard Exit is almost as eye-catching as the cinema it shows. It screens a range of movie offerings, from popular independent and foreign-language films to more obscure festival fare. Keeping up with the times, the theater has upgraded its facilities to include both digital projection and sound, and often plays host to screenings for both the annual Seattle International Film Festival and the Lesbian and Gay Film Festival.
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    807 East Roy Street
    Seattle, WA US
  • Bite of Seattle
    In Focus: Whirligig Festival What it is: An annual festival, during which giant bounce houses and other inflatables take over the Seattle Center. When it happens: two weeks out of the year, generally during spring break The target audience: children 12 and younger; a toddler zone caters to the youngest visitors Cost: ranges from $1.50 for a single ride to $7.50 for an all-day pass; Thursdays are free Shapes of the inflated structures: slides, castles, and pirate ships Activities that don’t require jumping up and down: face painting, crafts, and balloon making Things for parents to do: Relax, and secretly wish someone would let them climb inside a giant gumball machine.
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    305 Harrison St (Fisher Pavilion Building)
    Seattle, WA US
  • Fremont Outdoor Cinema
    Most summer weekends, up to 1,000 cineastes flock to Fremont Outdoor Movies for screenings of pop classics, cult favorites, indie films, and video shorts broadcast via Blu-Ray digital projection with 5.1 THX surround sound. Omitting only the cars and the prohibitions against hand holding, Fremont pays homage to the drive-in theaters of old as warm summer evenings slowly fade into warm summer nights. Audiences of all ages bring lawn chairs, rubber floats, and even sofas to enjoy movies such as Raising Arizona, Sideways, and Caddyshack. Fremont Outdoor Movies believes that the community of an open-air theater is often the best part of the experience. In addition to regular screenings, they also hold special events such as an Edward Scissorhands–inspired haircutting contest and a Show Us Your Scar contest to celebrate Young Frankenstein. Outside the theater, cinephiles can cruise a makeshift food court provided by Mobile Food Rodeo.
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    3501 Phinney Ave N
    Seattle, WA US
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