Sushi in Wedgewood

Select Local Merchants

When a guest walks into Blue C Sushi, a staff member greets them with a cheerful “Irasshaimase!”—a traditional Japanese salutation that translates literally as “welcome to our store.” That warm welcome isn't the only surprise in store for guests though: a parade of vibrantly colored plates inspired by modern Tokyo subway lines moves past on a modern conveyer belt, dazzling eyes with their delicious and equally colorful contents. Dishes such as cucumber and seaweed salads, or the namesake Blue C sushi roll (with spicy crab, scallions, sliced tuna, tobiko, and shiso) await to be selected directly from the display, and each plate's color corresponds directly to the dish's price and the mood of the chef who prepared it. In this way, guests can build a completely custom meal around any budget, starting with raw or cooked sushi, all the way down to desserts, such as mochi. Of course, the friendly staff members are always on hand to help answer questions about each dish as it ambles past, and to refresh dishes regularly.

4601 26th Ave NE
Seattle,
WA
US

Setsuna Japanese Restaurant: A User’s Guide
Authentic Japanese Food | Izakaya-Style Small Plates | Karaoke | Happy Hour

Sample Menu

  • Small plate: karaage—fried, boneless chicken thighs flavored with a special secret sauce
  • Entree: udon noodle soup with shrimp and vegetable tempura on the side
  • Dessert: coffee jelly, a traditional Japanese gelatin made from cooled coffee

When to Go

  • Any day except Monday, when the restaurant is closed.
  • Between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. if you want to sit in the dining room, otherwise you’ll have to move to the bar, which serves dinner and drinks until midnight Sunday and Tuesday–Thursday and until 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

What to Drink: Setsuna serves a variety of beer, wine, and liquor imported directly from Japan to help make the experience as authentic as possible. Sample some sweet plum wine, grab a bottle of Sapporo lager, or sip on some 12-year Hakushu whiskey.

Inside Tips

  • Stop by on the weekends for a chance to take the stage during karaoke.
  • If you missed the one-hour happy hour at 5 p.m., don’t fret—there’s another one that runs 9–11 p.m.

Vocab Lesson
Izakaya: a Japanese style of dining where dishes are ordered and brought to the table in a consistent, casual fashion designed to encourage sharing.
Hamachi: young yellowtail, popular in sushi.

If You Can't Make It, Try This: I Love Bento (7500 35th Avenue NE) serves up Japanese cuisine such as chicken teriyaki and tuna rolls in an unpretentious setting.

11204 Roosevelt Way NE
Seattle,
WA
US

The chefs at Sumo Sushi create specialty sushi rolls and teriyaki meals for lunch and dinner. They serve guests fresh nigiri and sashimi such as salmon, eel, and squid. Beer, sake, and wine can help wash down any number of sushi rolls, such as the Hawaii, with bluefin tuna over a California roll, or shrimp tempura with crabmeat and avocado.

12716 Lake City Way NE
Seattle,
WA
US

U:Don Fresh Japanese Noodle Station: A User’s Guide

Fresh Handmade Noodles | Soups and Sauces from Scratch | Sanuki-Style Udon

Sample Menu

  • Noodles: sauce udon, hot or chilled and lightly dressed in dashi-shoyu sauce
  • Side: chicken karaage
  • Dessert: flan

Raves

  • “One reason for the hype is the perfectly firm and chewy homemade udon.” — Seattle Weekly
  • “The curry udon has a savory, earthy kick. But you can’t go wrong with any of the udon dishes, especially those in broth.” — The Stranger
  • “On a warm day, try the zaru udon, the thick noodles with soy dipping sauce, ginger and scallions.” — Seattle Magazine

Inside Tips

  • Food is ordered cafeteria-style, so you’ll step up to the counter, choose your noodles and the accoutrements that go with it—such as the tempura flakes that add crunch to each bowl.
  • While you’re waiting in line, watch as fresh noodles are made in the open kitchen.

Vocab Lesson
Dashi: a fish stock or broth used in Japanese cuisine that’s typically made with dried kelp and bonito flakes.
Karaage: a Japanese technique in which chicken (or meat or fish) is marinated in soy sauce, garlic, and ginger, coated in flour or starch, then deep-fried.

While You’re in the Neighborhood
Before: Catch an indie flick at Grand Illusion Cinema (1405 NE 50th Street).

After: Walk off your meal and learn about dinosaurs at the same time with a visit to the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture (17th Avenue NE and NE 45th Street).

4515 University Way NE
Seattle,
WA
US

Ramen is an important dish in Japan—the country boasts more than 40,000 ramen shops. And each region boasts its own unique style of the soupy noodles, which makes for more than two dozen regional varieties. The owners of Samurai Noodle took their cue from their Japanese counterparts, packing their menu with 12 types of ramen, including the less soupy dipping ramen. A range of broth options—including miso chicken, chili green onion, and tomato—cradle helpings of noodles, be they thick egg noodles or thin wheat noodles. The chefs take customization one step further, letting customers specify their preferred noodle firmness. Additional toppings for the soup creations include chili sauce, black mushrooms, and eggs.

4138 University Way NE
Seattle,
WA
US

A Standout in Seattle's Japanese Dining Scene

Amid Seattle's sea of Japanese restaurants, Miyabi 45th stands out. That's because, rather than specialize in sushi, Miyabi 45th's menu spotlights one of Japan's most overlooked staple foods: the soba noodle.

There are multiple ways to enjoy these buckwheat-based noodles, which chefs make in-house from Washington-grown grains: they can be served cool, with a side of dipping sauce, or piping-hot in savory broth. Chefs also concoct a variety of creative dishes to pair them with; think foie gras "tofu," miso-marinated brie, and Japanese whiskey-glazed chicken wings. Sommelier-chosen sakes and craft cocktails further enhance the dining experience.

Elevating Soba to New Heights

Chef Mutsuko Soma, the Japanese-born chef behind Miyabi 45th, studied a wide variety of cuisines at the Art Institute of Seattle?s culinary program. But no matter how many new flavors she tried, she remained captivated with simple soba.

After stints at such lauded restaurants such as Harvest Vine and Chez Shea, she returned to Japan to learn the art of soba-noodle preparation, mastering traditional hand-forming and cutting techniques. Now that she's back in Seattle, area diners can enjoy the fruits of her studies at Miyabi 45th, where she and her chefs elevate this traditional dish with modern add-ons such as sous-vide egg and oysters.

2208 N 45th St
Seattle,
WA
US