Sightseeing in Sherbrooke

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Astride their trusty snowmobiles, the knowledgeable guides at Jay Snowmobile Adventures help visiting adventurers conquer the winter landscape during tours of picturesque Vermont snowscapes. One- and two-person tour packages begin at the outfitter’s home base, located 3 miles from the entrance of Jay Peak Resort. From there, groups wind through the wilderness of Jay, Vermont and parts of Westfield for up to two hours, exploring the snowy nooks and frost-covered crannies of Jay State Forest and the nearby countryside. They rarely make the trip alone, though; moose and white-tailed deer often dot the secluded paths, ready to pose for snapshots in their most photogenic outfits.

1100 Route 242
Jay,
VT
US

The story of the United States Navy begins on Lake Champlain. The year was 1776, and the fledgling American Revolution seemed doomed to failure almost before it began after a naval retreat to the town known today as Whitehall, New York. Then the Continental Congress issued a command on June 17 of 1776 "to build, with all expedition, as many galleys and armed vessels as ... shall be sufficient to make us indisputably masters of the lakes Champlain and George." By August, eight new gunboats were afloat on the lake—just in time to face the British in the Battle of Valcour.

That story and hundreds more come to life in the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum's collection of more than 15,000 artifacts, images, and documents. Visitors can marvel at the massive 10' x 8' rudder of the steamboat Champlain II, and explore her shipwreck in real time using a remote-operated vehicle. In the Hazelett Watercraft Center, the 111-year-old ice yacht Storm King towers over 90 dugouts, bark canoes, kayaks, rowing skiffs, and sailboats. But the core of the museum is the Key to Liberty exhibit, where visitors can read eyewitness accounts of the Battle of Valcour and marvel at a 9-foot scale model of a gunboat. On fair days, the full-size gunboat replica Philadelphia II sets sail, giving passengers a glimpse of a distant era without the bother of going though a time machine broker first.

4472 Basin Harbor Rd
Vergennes,
VT
US

With thousands of flight hours under his belt, experienced pilot Keith Deschambeault of Acadian Seaplanes chauffeurs nature-bound groups over breathtaking treetops and seascapes in a single-engine plane specially designed for water landings. Maine's illustrious coastline unfolds below as the small, sturdy planes soar on specialized air tours that seek out moose, remote mountain lakes, or destination fishing for trout, bass, and Maine's native aquamoose.

2640 Main St
Rangeley,
ME
US

In late December, Ice Castles? creator, Brent Christensen, and a team of ice artists will finish transforming more than 12,000 tons of ice into full-fledged castles. With multiple large towers and ice walls, visitors are totally surrounded by the organic shapes of shimmering ice as they explore tunnels, courtyards, and caverns. In daytime, the castles glimmer in the sun; come nightfall, thousands of LED lights create an ethereal glow from within.

Today, the castles delight visitors of all ages, but the idea came from Brent Christensen?s winter playtimes with his kids. They had already made ice rinks, ice caves, and other chilly creations when Brent decided to build a fort entirely out of ice, using icicles as the base structure. The kids dubbed the structure an ?ice castle??and it started to look more and more like one as Brent added a cave, tunnels, and a slide that spilled onto an ice-skating rink. Eventually, cars started detouring to their block to drive past the creation, and local snowmen inquired about home prices. But the idea truly took off when a local resort asked him to build a larger ice castle for them. He?s built ice castles every winter since, including one in the winter of 2010?2011 that was featured in the Denver Post and called ?a frosty, fairy-tale-like landscape? by the Los Angeles Times.

60 Loon Mountain Road
Lincoln,
NH
US

The Lancaster Fair takes up a whole 65 acres, but there's something different to see, hear, or do in nearly every square foot. Year after year after year?every year-after-year since 1870, in fact?the week-long Fair has signaled the end of summer better than an auctioneer counting down the seconds ever could. Through it all, the Fair has served as an annual celebration of the region's roots, history, and family values?a showcase of what makes life in the great North Woods so unique.

Each visit offers a mix of educational exhibits and honest entertainment. During your visit, you could sow your knowledge with agricultural activities, 4-H exhibits, and displays of vegetables, flowers, and the county's largest pumpkin. Or you could simply kick back and enjoy leisure activities ranging from concerts and demolition derbies while animals compete for the inheritance of their owners' farms in spectacles such as horse-pulling events, oxen skills challenges, and sheep-dog trials.

516 Main St.
Lancaster,
NH
US

As the sun sets and the city lights begin to twinkle, the catamaran of Croisière Le Montréalais beckons guests with its glowing neon blue or pink deck. With revelers aboard, the bright lights dance across the inky waters as Le Montréalais heads out into the night. And while the ship may creep silently through the waters, the decks are anything but quiet as up to 300 guests mingle on two indoor and three outdoor decks. The design of the boat is sleek and modern, with ice-blue lighting, pure white furniture, neon mood lighting, and synthetic grass on the outdoor deck and the ceiling of the up-side-down putting room. A dance floor and full sound system invite guests to dance the night away, and menus provide sustenance with bites of salmon tartar, pork ravioli, and lamb sliders.

300, du Saint-Sacrement, Suit 425
Montreal,
QC
CA