Restaurants in South Boston

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Amid the clattering pins and spirited cheers that echo across Boston Bowl's lanes, Jack Torchetti never lets his attention drift from his three stainless steel tanks. As the brewmaster for Deadwood Cafe and Brewery—the entertainment complex's site for quick eats and frosty drafts—Jack ensures that the taps constantly flow with five different beers, all of which he creates on the premises. The selection includes everything from a stout made using four varieties of malt to a pilsner made with Liberty and East Kent Golding hops. Growlers are available as well as pints and pitchers, allowing patrons to enjoy their beer at home or at the nearest crazy straw factory.

While ordering a beer from the counter, customers can snag a quick bite from the café's menu of classic comfort foods. In addition to wood-smoked St. Louis-style ribs that fall off the bone, the cooks grill Angus burgers, load down sandwiches with Boar's Head deli meats, and glaze wings with piquant buffalo sauce. The menu also includes a handful of Italian-inspired dishes, namely 10 different pizzas and calzones stuffed with everything from thin-sliced ham and cheese to baby spinach, onions, and feta.

820 William T Morrissey Blvd
Boston,
MA
US

Pan Asia summons guests into its sleek yet casual atmosphere with oceanic lighting, mounted TVs, and its star: a menu of Chinese, Japanese, and Thai recipes. Nests of lo mein noodles cradle tender slices of shrimp, beef, roast pork, and chicken, and five styles of Thai curries—including the Indian-influenced massaman—transform coconut milk into liquid heat, warming tongues with infusions of classic spices. Representing the artful cuisine of Japan, paper-thin sheaths of seaweed enfold rice and raw fish to create sushi varieties that include spicy salmon maki and boston maki, a roll of yellowtail, crab stick, avocado, scallions, and tobiko.

Sea-foam-green lights illuminate the underside of the counter at the sushi bar, making the legs of guests look as though they’re underwater or ailed with the asparagus disease. Bright-green shafts of bamboo shoot from floor to ceiling from a bed of dried river rocks, obscuring the intimately lit restaurant from the bright lights of the takeout lobby.:m]]

414 W Broadway
Boston,
MA
US

The flat-screen televisions and long wooden bar at Freeport Tavern might mark it as just another pub, but the wood-fired grill in the kitchen tells a different story. With it, chefs bake Italian-style thin-crust pizzas or sear smoky flavor into marinated choice-certified Angus beef steak tips. They also grill burger patties, fish filets, and chunks of New England lobster, then stuff them into sandwiches served with hand-cut fries. They pair their pastiche of New England eats with a constant stream of entertainment, whether it’s the latest local NBA and NHL action on the TVs, trivia on Tuesday nights, or performances by DJs and live musicians held Wednesday through Saturday nights. As soon as the DJ packs up on Sundays, the tireless chefs begin whipping up the brunch buffet, complete with a salad and dessert bar and omelette station.

780 William T Morrissey Blvd
Dorchester,
MA
US

When festival founder Anne-Marie Aigner first noticed the burgeoning food-truck scenes on the West Coast and the Midwest, her prescient mind foresaw that the tide would make its way to New England. In order to cultivate the nascent movement, she founded her food-truck-festival tour to bring dozens of trucks' eclectic wares to locales outside of Boston. Already scoring mentions in Boston and Worcester Mag in its first year, the festival has featured such four-wheeled kitchens as Redbones BBQ and Roxy's Grilled Cheese. Aigner hopes to sustain the food-truck industry beyond the festival's inaugural year by attracting interest throughout the region and motivating grassroots support for the mobile culinary spots and their future descendants, sandwich-slinging helicopters.

Campus Center,100 William T Morrissey Blvd,100 William T Morrissey Blvd
Dorchester,
MA
US

Though it’s clear from the name that Pho 2000 specializes in traditional Vietnamese noodle soups, Boston Magazine warned diners not to sell its other selections short. “Everything that comes out of the kitchen is superlative,” they raved when naming Pho 2000 the best Vietnamese restaurant of Boston in 2006. The publication recommended the Bo 7 Mon, seven rounds of beef that may be fried, skewered, marinated, steamed, or placed in a relaxing bubble bath. Beef isn’t the only star; hot pot feasts invite guests to cook a platter of seafood in savory broth simmered tableside.

198 Adams St
Dorchester,
MA
US

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