Kitchen Remodeling in South Old Bridge

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Inside ProtecHockey Ponds Ice Center’s impressive, 52,000-square-foot facility, figure skaters, hockey players, and casual skaters alike glide across three separate ice surfaces—including an NHL regulation-size rink—during lessons, games, and public-skating sessions. Ranging from junior hockey players to New Jersey state figure-skating champions, the team of coaches imparts skills during everything from introductory skating lessons to four-day hockey camps. When the center isn't hosting the public for skate sessions, ProtecHockey Ponds Ice Center is home to the Rutgers University Men's Ice Hockey team, the Protec Ducks Hockey Program, and the nationally recognized Protec Academy Learn-to-Skate Program. Beyond the boards, a full-service café serves lattes for visitors to warm up before watching the center's hockey teams. The rink's staff can also host birthday parties, group outings, and fundraisers in their private room.

15 Worlds Fair Dr
Somerset,
NJ
US

Bath Junkie offers a full range of bath products that are custom-blended, with more than 200 scents to mix and match, and fifteen tints. Most products are made from all natural ingredients, while some contain FDA approved, anti-microbial and other skin-soothing, synthetically derived elements. "Aloe-lu-yah" lotion ($11.75 for 4 ounces, $22 for 8 ounces) is designed to sooth sunburns, and "silky allover" hair and body shampoo ($11.75 for 4 oz., $22 for 8 oz.) contains moisturizing glycerin and doses of vitamins A and E to nourish follicles, and "that darn dog" shampoo ($19) and conditioner cleans critters. Scent-conscious men can customize their own shave gel ($11.75 for 4 oz., $22 for 8 oz.), and clean freaks can customize the scent of "clean freak," an antibacterial, biodegradable all-purpose cleaner ($15).

58 Monmouth St
Red Bank,
NJ
US

To call The Body Shop a mere skin and body care store is to miss half of what makes it special. Late founder Dame Anita Roddick was a pioneer for ethical business practices; upon opening her first store in Brighton, England, in 1976, she developed company values such as "Defend Human Rights" and "Protect The Planet." She somehow balanced principles and profit, partnering in global campaigns with UNICEF, Greenpeace, Amnesty International, and the United Nations, all while ultimately expanding her brand into 2,500 locations in over 60 international markets. After her death in 2007, then-British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said, “She campaigned for green issues for many years before it became fashionable to do so and inspired millions to the cause by bringing sustainable products to a mass market. . . . She was an inspiration.”

Indeed, the Body Shop exhibits an eco-friendliness and social consciousness that's hard to come by in a company of its size. Its products have been fair-trade since 1987, and its Against Animal Testing movement led to an EU-wide ban of animal testing of cosmetics. The products are made from ingredients harvested from around the world: shea butter from Ghana goes into body scrubs and butters, and Indian artisans craft wooden massagers and tote bags that are screenprinted by hand. But all that isn't to say the company's production practices overshadow its final products. Skincare treatments such as the brand’s iconic body butters, facial products, and gift collections often appear in Allure, Marie Claire, Lucky, Seventeen and other national publications.

30 Mall Dr W
Jersey City,
NJ
US

"This is a candy shop for creativity," Make Meaning's CEO, Dan Nissanoff, told New York Family. The crafting hotspot, named the Best Crafting Hub by New York Magazine, boasts a dizzying range of activities. Inside the brightly lit confines, youngsters and adults can make candles, jewelry, and soap. They can also paint ceramic pieces, create paintings on canvas, and decorate cakes.

The inspiration behind the business? The connections that Nissanoff made with his family when they worked on craft projects together. In order to offer that up to other families, he created Make Meaning, where he and his staff lead guests through craft projects, organize special events from corporate gatherings to birthday parties, and encourage inventiveness and fun.

506 Amsterdam Ave
New York,
NY
US

Metropolitan Window Fashions’ expert staffers beautify windows and reinvent rooms with a wide selection of custom drapery, bedding, and reupholstered furniture that has been featured in the New York Times. Patrons can browse a long list of festive and functional Hunter Douglas window treatments, including chalet wood blinds ($103.48, including materials and installation) and designer roller or screen shades ($106.11, including materials and installation). Creative customers can collaborate on custom drapery, which generally cost between $300 and $700. Prices are based on materials, lining, and pleat styles, and do not include installation costs, which run $15 to $21 per linear foot. Metropolitan’s textile wizards will also materialize custom bedspreads out of thin air (starting at $200, not including fabric), perfect for swaddling a sleeping place or making your own ghost costume. Today's deal is also good for reupholstery service, which can revitalize elderly couches ($1,040 before fabric), chairs ($450 before fabric), and dining-room seats ($84 before fabric). Fabric for custom projects can cost between $30 and $100 per yard, depending on the type of fabric, its pattern, and whether or not it can talk.

189 E 79th St
New York,
NY
US

With more than 30 years combined experience MCK+B is the leader in design and installation of custom kitchen cabinetry in New York City. Our mission is to provide innovative, responsive kitchen and bath design, through technology, craftsmanship, mechanical expertise and exceptional service to our clients.

29 E 19th St
New York,
NY
US