Tours in South Suffolk

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Great White Water Sports creates a harmony with the gentle crash of waves, the powerful growls of jet skis, and the excited yelps of families as they launch a variety of jet-ski rentals right from the sands of Chesapeake Bay. Ranked second on the Norfolk activity list by TripAdvisor, and backed by favorable attention from USA Today, their lifeguard-trained team also saddles up jet skis in waters warmer than the Atlantic and with smaller waves. Their jet skis are not equipped with any speed-restriction devices, allowing guests to rev up their engines and feel the wind hit their faces as they send wake waves rolling shoreward.

1000 E Ocean View Ave.
Norfolk,
VA
US

Day and night, the US Coast Guard–certified Lost Pearl, a replica of a 65-foot Spanish galleon, roams the waters of Virginia Beach while searching for scallywags. During family cruises, kids take in tales from the pirate crew and battle passing vessels with spewing water cannons while their parents sip on beer, wine, and frozen drinks. Come dusk, adults converge on the decks to mingle over cocktails and watch as onboard pirates present bawdy skits.

308 Mediterranean Ave
Virginia Beach,
VA
US

Plenty of utensils and wares decorated tables in 18th-century America, but only a few became a symbol of protest during the Revolution, one of them was the teapot. It's these subtle traces of cultural change that take center stage in the permanent and temporary exhibits at DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Here, developments in civilian and military infantry, such as ignition systems and muzzle-loading firearms, signal the progress of 18th-century weaponry, while 1690s-1820s furniture from New England through the Mid-Atlantic highlight developing cultural and regional trends.

Though a bulk of the museum's collection—including one of the biggest assortments of British ceramics outside England—was mainly used in the home, some objects were designed for outside the domestic sphere. An original fire engine built in the mid-18th century stands unscathed by flames, and a collection of medals made for George Washington honors the time he beat up that cherry tree. Scholars delve deeper into these and other artifacts during lectures held in Hennage Auditorium.

326 W Francis St
Williamsburg,
VA
US

Taste of Williamsburg's guides would love to spend the whole day showing you the sites of the city. But they'd rather do that while they show you where the city's best ribs are. And since you're already on that side of town, they may as well as take you across the street for a life-changing slice of cheesecake, available only during its Dessert Attack tour.

During enthusiastic walking food tours, a savvy guide shows small groups around Williamsburg's thriving dining scenes, taking them through neighborhoods from Merchants Square to New Town and helping them discovering new dining digs across the city. At each stop, chefs at an array of restaurants prepare traditional regional dishes or global cuisine—at one establishment guests may sample Virginia ham or peanuts, at the next they'll enjoy reinterpreted macaroni-and-cheese or goat-cheese pizza (which George Washington often enjoyed cold for breakfast).

424 West Duke of Gloucester Street
Williamsburg,
VA
US

Randy and Jill Pryor took their first segway tour in 2010 and didn't want it to end. The experience inspired them to travel to the Segway, Inc. headquarters, where they became certified Segway Level II technicians. They founded Patriot Tours & Provisions in order to share the experience with others, which is exactly what they do during guided jaunts through Yorktown. There's the historical tour, which winds through sites linked to the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, and the breeze tour, which explores the York River and surrounding historical neighborhood. They also offer off-road nature rides through New Quarter Park and tours of the Kingsmill Resort.

323 Water St
Yorktown,
VA
US

Eerie Nights Ghost Tours aren't only eerie because they stop at historic, plausibly haunted Richmond locales on its walking and 1920s-themed trolley-ride tours. There's another creepy component?the guides. They look undead, thanks to their special-effects makeup and spooky costumes. They act it, too, showcasing their theater chops as they share their suspenseful supernatural stories about the city, like the time a local coffee shop passed off decaf as regular coffee.

100 North 17th Street
Richmond,
VA
US