Tours in Spring Hill

$65 for Segway Guided Tour of Historic Franklin for Two from Franklin Segway Tours and Rental ($120 Value)

Franklin Segway Tours and Rentals

Franklin

$120 $65

90-minute guided Segway tour of Historic Franklin charters historical Civil War sites & scenic pathways next to rivers and wooded areas

Moped Tour for Two, Four, or Eight at Nashville Scooter Tours (Up to 48% Off)

Nashville Scooter Tours

Downtown Nashville

$120 $69

(56)

Guests hop on electric scooters, and head out in caravans to see some of Nashville's iconic sights

Music City Rollin' Jamboree Tour for Two, Four, or Six (Up to 49% Off)

The Music City Rollin' Jamboree

Nashville

$65 $39

Tourists BYOB and sing along to country tunes as comedians steer a fun bus tour of downtown and Music Row's biggest sights

Haunted-History Walking Tour for Two or Four with Ghost-Hunting Equipment from Spirit Expeditions (50% Off)

Spirit Expeditions

Downtown Nashville

$50 $25

A two-hour walking tour covers Nashville's most haunted areas and allows guests to conduct their own paranormal investigation

Walking Adventure for Two or Four from Crazy Dash Digital Adventures - Nashville

Crazy Dash Digital Adventures - Nashville

Nashville

$40 $20

Visit 10-12 checkpoints throughout the city to answer trivia questions, take selfies of fun tasks, and score points to top the competition

Creamery Tour with Goat Cheese for One or Two, or $15 for $18.99 Worth of Cheese at Belle Chevre

Belle Chevre

Elkmont

$18.99 $10

Folks get a behind the scene look at how goat cheese is made at creamery housed in an old town cotton warehouse

Select Local Merchants

As a Sugar Creek Carriages horse, Flint attends so many weddings he might as well be standing on a cake. The charming percheron draft horse sports a fair complexion and snowy mane that match traditionally white wedding dresses and the wedding carriages he often tows. He is one of 10 well-groomed, mannerly horses and ponies that provide the horsepower for an array of stylish buggies. Additionally, the animals make appearances at festivals, reenactments, and kids' pony parties. Sugar Creek Carriages also networks with the entertainment industry, a connection that recently led pop singer Justin Bieber to rent a carriage while he was in Nashville and his unicorn-drawn chariot was in the shop.

208 Broadway
Nashville,
TN
US

Being branded ?Roseanne Barr meets Jack Black? might be considered a slight to some, but Hick Chick Tours? guide Christy Eidson wears it as a badge of honor. The standup comedienne keeps her pub crawls, brewery tours, and bus tours light and irreverent with tongue-in-cheek asides. But since she?s a Tennessee native, there?s are also plenty of interesting historical information woven into her sassy narratives.

PO Box 330764
Nashville,
TN
US

Replete with ornate gardens and a brick mansion fronted by towering, white columns, Rippavilla Plantation winds the clock back to the time of the Civil War. In the fall, the smells of bonfires and steaming hot chocolate fill the sprawling grounds as they host pumpkin paintings and other old-timey, outdoor fun. The Rippavilla corn maze tests internal compasses and scarecrow-bribing techniques on a 10-acre, labyrinthine path. As they pass through the maze, guests encounter signs that boast historical facts about major Civil War battles in 1862, putting them in touch with the site's legacy. For a plus-size serving of fresh, autumn air, guests can also board the hayride to circle the grounds, which are devoid of the sinister ghouls that often emerge at many fall festivals; instead, the grounds remain family-friendly throughout the night.

5700 Main St
Spring Hill,
TN
US

In the gulches of an abandoned phosphate mine, a labyrinthine path echoes with the roar of unseen chainsaws and the rustles of hidden ghouls. Monsters and zombies lurk in the darkness at Millers Thrillers Zombie Paintball Hayride and Haunted Woods, but it isn't mere craving for blood or brains that makes them so eager to terrify––the scary staff members actually receive a bonus for making visitors wet themselves. Really. “I did always like Halloween," says founder and owner David Miller.

Miller wasn’t always in the pants-wetting business, but you might say the business of Halloween in his blood. He grew up growing and selling pumpkins with his grandfather and––though he admits he was too scared to try them as a kid––his interest in haunted houses led him to intense study in the art of scaring, including seminars and conventions. His interest in creating eerie worlds inspired him to begin his walk through haunted woods and zombie-paintball hayride––during which visitors wield mounted paintball guns to fire upon advancing zombies and blank canvases hurled by poltergeists. But landing a few paintball hits won't be enough to ease the natural terror of the haunt's surroundings. “There’s a lot of spooky stuff around all this country farmland… with no streetlights in sight,” Miller says. “We…play on the fact that people are going to feel like they’re lost in the middle of nowhere.”

Despite the fright fest’s scariness, Miller’s real aim is to give visitors a good time. Staff members go easy on little kids and the elderly, and at the end of the walk, customers can calm chattering teeth around a fire pit and rejoin the world of the living by gathering around the concession stand or a stage that hosts a nightly illusionist and zombie drum line.

2499 Greens Mill Road
Columbia,
TN
US

Dream Adventures USA's guides lead informative, scenic tours down the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers. Up to three sets of sightseeing eyes can climb aboard each Yamaha 110 jet ski for a river trek. Cumberland River voyages, which cover up to 120 miles, include an exploration of Old Hickory Lake's coves, inlets, and dam before breezing through downtown Nashville and stopping at Rock Harbor for lunch. A sampling of up to 60 miles of the Tennessee River loops around Long Island and gives riders a view of the Alabama state line, which glows like the first down marker used on NFL broadcasts. Both tours begin with a brief safety overview and conclude at the original launch site.

468 Forrest Park Cir
Franklin,
TN
US

On the evening of November 30, 1864, the town of Franklin, Tennessee, bore witness to more than five hours of carnage as Confederate forces under the command of General John Bell Hood assaulted an entrenched corps of Federal troops led by General John M. Schofield. The heaviest fighting entailed a frontal attack on the Federal lines?incorporating about 20,000 soldiers on each side, or more soldiers than Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. General Hood hoped this attack would dislodge the Federal forces and that he would be able to eventually recapture Nashville.

Over the course of the next five hours, this charge resulted in a staggering number of casualties and General Schofield steadily withdrew his forces toward Nashville, leaving behind a battle-scarred town as well as a battered Confederate force. Today, the Battle of Franklin Trust allows visitors to learn more about this key battle by visiting and taking guided tours of several sites that played integral roles in the events that took place on and around November 30, 1864.

The Carter House served as the command post for General Jacob D. Cox, a Federal officer tasked with overseeing the construction of defensive positions as the Confederate forces advanced. These defenses were constructed within 300 feet of the home, and guests have the opportunity to explore the grounds as well as the home, including the basement where the Carter family and roughly two dozen civilians sought shelter from the battle being fought outside their doors.

One of those civilians was Albert Lotz, whose own home still stands 110 steps away from the Carter residence. The Lotz House bears its own battle scars, too, including a charred indentation in the wood flooring that was caused by an errant cannonball.

Located one mile away from the two houses, the McGavock family's Carnton Plantation also welcomes guests, providing them with tours of the site that served as the area's largest field hospital after the fighting ceased. The plantation features two acres of land that the McGavocks offered as the final burial site for approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers who died at the Battle of Franklin, making it the largest privately owned military cemetery in the nation.

1345 Carnton Ln
Franklin,
TN
US