Kids Activities in Stephenville

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Though the creatures on display at Dinosaur World don’t need much space to roam, plenty of care has been taken to furnish them a comfortable habitat. They peer imposingly from the hillsides of Kentucky, crane their necks up through native trees, and stomp through prairie fields. Although a life-size mammoth or T. rex might be hard to miss, little visitors might still jump with delight at noticing a baby dino suddenly appear from behind a bush. Giant brachiosaurus necks arch high above treetops, while toothy meat-eaters and spiny stegosauruses roam the world below. The fiberglass, steel, and concrete models reach up to 80 feet in length, and are built according to the latest scientific discoveries about what dinosaurs looked like and what styles were trendy in the Mesozoic era.

The first Dinosaur World location was a former alligator farm in Florida and five years later another one was opened in Kentucky. As Swedish-born Christer Svensson began to fill it with statues, he consulted with experts around the world to not only create realistic reptiles but to surround them with fun, educational activities. Kids can sift through sand to find shark’s teeth, gastropod shells, and trilobites in a fossil dig, get to know some lizards a little better on the playground, or examine ancient eggs and raptor claws in the museum.

1058 Park Road 59
Glen Rose,
TX
US

In 1885, behind the counter of Wade Morrison's Old Corner Drug Store on the corner of Six Shooter Junction in Waco, Texas, pharmacist Charles Adlerton was struck by an idea. After observing how much patrons loved the combined scent of the many ingredients hidden within the soda fountain, he decided to create a drink that captured all their properties. He wound up inventing Dr. Pepper, and after one sip, Dublin Bottling Works owner Sam Houston Prim knew he wanted to sell it. Though the famous drink and plant have since parted ways, Dublin Bottling Works continues to celebrate that original legacy by crafting pure-cane-sugar sodas in chilled glass bottles, the way their employees have for more than 100 years.

Today, the bottlers' products find their way onto shelves all around the nation, and they invite visitors to come watch them while they work. They lead tours through their historic plant and the memorabilia-laden museum that now occupies their original offices. At the end of the tour, they make a stop in Old Doc's Soda Shop, where visitors can sample their products from an old fashioned soda fountain and buy bottled goods to drink at home or shake vigorously and then offer to neighbors who keep eating your newspapers.

105 E Elm St
Dublin,
TX
US

Brazos Carriage Company ferries sightseers about Sundance Square and Highland Park for enjoyable excursions behind its trusty team of equine engines. Riders can flag the carriage down on the curb for an impromptu spin or reserve it ahead of time for weddings, holiday rides, or romantic jaunts without the kids or digital pets.

The company also offers a romantic-proposal service, which involves an ambiance-filled ride to the Fort Worth Water Gardens. The lengthy trip affords any gentleman plenty of time to work up the nerve to ask a special someone for either her hand in marriage or a figurative hand with refurbishing his muscle car.

PO Box 315
Cleburne,
TX
US

Bowlers have sent pins clattering for more than 30 years upon Pin Center Bowl's rows of gleaming lanes. The 16 alleys host bouts of friendly competition among families and friends, who hurtle balls toward the hapless pins and tally their points with Brunswick Vector scoring equipment, rather than committing each point to memory via complex riddles. To accommodate kiddies' games, forgiving bumpers rise to block gutter balls. Between frames, players can snag snacks and drinks from the concession stand and full bar, and billiards tables and an arcade keep hand-eye coordination in tip-top shape. Pin Center Bowl also offers the Dragon Bowling Ball Ramp to assist children in knocking down pins.

112 Williams Ave
Cleburne,
TX
US

Since 1952, the family-operated lot at The Brazos Drive-in Theatre has invited carloads of movie-lovers to kill their engines, tune their radios to 89.1 FM, and recline as far as their seats allow for the evening?s double features. The historic theatre is the longest continually running drive-in in Texas, and was almost obliterated near to its 50th anniversary when a tornado rampaged through the lot, ripping half of the screen apart and saving the audience from a Rob Schneider film. Refurbished to its former glory, the recently upgraded digital screen now lights up against the darkening sky to show premier films.

1800 W Pearl St.
Granbury,
TX
US