Museums in Surrey

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For more than 30 years, the non-profit, volunteer-driven Canadian Museum of Flight has educated aviation enthusiasts about British Columbia's flying-machine history with a comprehensive, well-preserved collection of aircraft and aviation artifacts. Among its flock of winged warriors, visitors will find replicas of WW1 aircrafts, a Waco biplane from 1930, a Douglas DC-3 transport from 1940, and a 1942 Hampden bomber, which was used in World War II and is the last craft of its type in existence. Hand-plucked jets include a de Havilland Vampire fighter, the all-Canadian designed and built CF-100, and the needle-nosed Lockheed Starfighter. While some of these crafts, like a third eye, are just for show, many of the fleet-footed fleet regularly take to the skies at airshows and events during the warmer months. Groupon users also receive a 15% discount off anything in the aviation gift shop.

5333 216 St
Langley,
BC
CA

A stream and a short bridge separate Burnaby Village Museum from the outside world. Crossing over is like stepping into a time machine, one that transports visitors back to a tram-stop community in the early 20th century. In fact, an original electric tram is still there, as is an entire town of living, breathing historical characters.

  • Size: a 10-acre living history town, with approximately 40 attractions and more than 50,000 artifacts that bring the the roaring 1920s back to life
  • Eye Catchers: Townsfolk?dressed in period costumes?who chat with visitors, give blacksmithing demonstrations, and show how to operate a printing press without a single lifehack
  • Crown Jewel: the C.W. Parker Carousel, a restored attraction from 1912 that sends riders around at 7 mph and plays music via a 1925 Wurlitzer Military band organ
  • Where to Eat: the old-fashioned ice cream parlor
  • Iconic Building: the 1893 Love Farmhouse, which is the oldest building in Burnaby
  • Special Programs: tours, black-and-white movie screenings, and seasonal Market Mondays that sell locally made goods
6501 Deer Lake Ave
Burnaby,
BC
CA

240 East Cordova Street used to be the address where Vancouver?s police officers, morticians, judges, and dead converged. The building, which was built in 1932, served as the city?s coroner?s court and morgue until the 1980s and the city analyst?s lab until 1995. Countless toxicology tests and several high-profile investigations have taken place between the building?s walls, including the Castellani Milkshake Murder and Errol Flynn?s autopsy. Fittingly, given the building?s significance to Vancouver's criminal-justice history, it is now home to the Vancouver Police Museum.

To date, the museum staff has curated a selection of approximately 20,000 historical artifacts, including confiscated weapons, counterfeit currency, photographs, paperwork, and vintage police vehicles. Currently, 40 per cent of the collection is on display in the museum?s several exhibits, one of which allows visitors to explore a coroner?s forensic lab. The museum also offers educational programs such as walking tours and a two-hour forensic-science program. During this program, guests scour a faux crime scene for clues and try to prevent the brash, young rookie cop from running off into the night to find the perpetrator.

240 E Cordova St.
Vancouver,
BC
CA

Cities are the ultimate conglomerations, existing as both the collections of people, institutions, and locations that currently compose them as well as the memories of all of the bygone inhabitants that came before. Without some concept of that past, current-day residents are hard-pressed to really understand their present. Fortunately, the historians at Museum of Vancouver keep visitors in the know with expertly curated exhibits revealing the unforgettable events that shaped the city's character. Rotating exhibits each year showcase introspective works. 2014's feature exhibit, Rewilding Vancouver, explores humankind's relationship with nature through the lens of Vancouver's historical ecology. Complete with area taxidermy specimens, 3D models, soundscapes, videos, and photo interventions, visitors encounter Vancouver's dominant species, fish-bearing streams underneath city streets, and a life-sized creation of the now-extinct Steller?s Sea Cow. Additionally, the Museum of Vancouver?s history galleries tell the city?s stories from the early 1900s through the late 1970s.

1100 Chestnut St.
Vancouver,
BC
CA

Helmed by Artistic Director Leila Getz, the Vancouver Recital Society has drawn internationally acclaimed artists to British Columbia for more than three decades. Over the years, the society has dazzled audiences with concerts by celebrity cellist Yo-Yo Ma and recitals by violin virtuoso Itzhak Perlman. With recitals spread across four of Vancouver’s most esteemed venues, the Vancouver Recital Society packs every season with esteemed and seasoned luminaries, while introducing audiences to future generations of classical royalty.

873 Beatty St
Vancouver,
BC
CA

Tasked with the preservation of British Columbia’s rich railroading history, the West Coast Railway Association’s train enthusiasts curate and maintain a collection of vintage rolling stock and artifacts. The heart of the 90-piece collection lies in the scenic confines of the West Coast Railway Heritage Park. Visitors are free to wonder the space’s wide-open tracks, visiting locomotives including the Royal Hudson, along with rarities such as an 1890 business car and a gently snoring 1905 sleeping car. A miniature railway affords pleasant rides around the 12 acres of grounds. With many pieces of operational equipment still on hand, the association also offers frequent train tours to destinations across British Columbia.

39645 Government Rd.
Squamish,
BC
CA