Restaurants in Tarrytown

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Chefs at Tarry Tavern strive to keep their cuisine local—many ingredients on the contemporary American menu are sourced from within 75 miles of the restaurant. What really sets the food apart, however, is the cooking—at least according to the New York Times. Pork chops are "succulent," steaks arrive "perfectly cooked to our order," and fish remains "glossy and moist" beneath a crisp skin, M.H. Reed wrote in a glowing 2010 review. To highlight these fresh flavors, chefs keep garnishes—such as sweet fennel purée or apple mostarda—simple and sparing.

This simplicity extends to the decor, which feels a bit like an English pub, but brighter. Red-oak paneling lines the walls, and broad front windows let light shine on an imposing wood bar, which was imported from the U.K. Patrons dine on white tablecloths beneath contemporary canvases depicting pastoral scenes, in line with the restaurant's locavore theme.

27 Main St
Tarrytown,
NY
US

A caravel—“caravela” in Portuguese—was a 15th-century ship used by the country’s explorers. The vessel’s small size made it easy to navigate along the coast of Africa and into the Atlantic Ocean. The ship not only gives Caravela its name, but also represents the eatery’s menu, a transatlantic meeting of Portuguese and Brazilian fare. The majority of the selection comes from the sea, too. Shrimp caravela, for one, has jumbo prawns swimming in a lemon-cognac butter sauce. The grilled swordfish is drizzled with a spicy baiana sauce derived from Brazilian cuisine. Of course, there are options for those not craving seafood: chefs fire pork chops, racks of lamb, and filets mignons. The staff serves all of this in a dining room with a nautical theme modeled after Captain Hook’s room at the retirement home.

53 N Broadway
Tarrytown,
NY
US

Within the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tarrytown, Bistro Z's chefs prepare breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus that showcase traditional and modern American cuisine in the Zagat-rated eatery's casual setting. Grilled salmon accompanies sides of cranberry beans, vegetarian chorizo, and spinach, and grilled new york strip steaks mingle with beer-battered onion rings, mashed potatoes, and seasonal veggies. Patrons can also enjoy lunchtime staples such as a prosciutto and preserved fig panini with goat cheese or a crab cake sandwich with remoulade.

455 S Broadway
Tarrytown,
NY
US

The name Cooper's Mill was lifted from a 19th-century flour mill that once graced Tarrytown, but that's not the only thing about this restaurant that's local. Locally and regionally sourced ingredients star in the eatery's upscale American plates, which revolve around proteins such as duck breast, grass-fed beef, and wild mushrooms. The bar keeps it local, too, with plenty of craft beers, bourbons, and vodkas from around the area. While sampling native flavors, guests commune over tables handcrafted out of barn wood in an open dining space that encourages friendly conversation.

670 White Plains Road
Tarrytown,
NY
US

The Huddle has more than 20 beers on tap behind its mahogany bar, ranging from PBR to Thomas Hooker watermelon ale, along with three wines and a sangria. These eclectic pours pair delectably with the kitchen's hearty bar food, such as a three-meat-blend burger, hand-cut sweet-potato fries, and pickles fried in a Sam Adams beer batter. The kitchen stays open until 3 a.m. Thursday–Saturday, and to accommodate sports fans, seven high-definition TVs play the latest games.

92 Beekman Ave
Sleepy Hollow,
NY
US

Papaya Joe's dishes up a flavorful menu of classic American eats paired with interesting sauces. Customers can choose from items such as hot dogs, hamburgers, tater tots, and chilidogs before adding on signature toppings such as roasted-pineapple-habanero sauce or smoky-sweet barbecue sauce. The restaurant also offers 21 types of paletas, or frozen-fruit bars, and tropical drinks in flavors such as mango.

260 Saw Mill River Rd.
Elmsford,
NY
US