Museums in Teaneck

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The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States, and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art. Founded on Ridgefield’s historic Main Street in 1964, the Museum concentrates its exhibition program on solo exhibitions by emerging and mid-career artists.

258 Main St
Ridgefield,
CT
US

Since 1971, the Bronx Museum of the Arts has amassed a diverse collection of 20th century and contemporary art that reflects the eclectic cultures of the Bronx and New York. Featured exhibits include Paul Strand: The Mexican Portfolio, a collection of 20 gravure plates that represent the artist's involvement with Mexican art and revolutionary politics. And currently running through December 31, 2010, the Yankee Stadiums exhibit commemorates the history of the storied stadium, including the iconic moment when Yankee fans saw the new stadium open after the old one became self-aware and launched itself into space.

1040 Grand Concourse
Bronx,
NY
US

We are your gateway to the Hudson Valley! Located in the City of Yonkers, on the banks of the Hudson, just 15 minutes north of the GW Bridge. Join us for dazzling exhibitions, Historic Glenview, Planetarium shows, music, lectures, and workshops.

511 Warburton Ave
Yonkers,
NY
US

From a stone mosaic that lined the floors of a fifth-century synagogue to the final rhyme spit out by a Jewish hip-hop artist, the span of The Jewish Museum New York's collections is as diverse as it is long. What began in 1904 with 26 artifacts has blossomed into a collection of 27,000 paintings, sculptures, and multimedia exhibits that dovetail into a collage of Jewish culture and identity from across centuries and continents.

The centerpiece of the museum is Culture and Continuity: A Jewish Journey, a permanent exhibit teeming with artifacts, videos, and art that collectively celebrate Jewish identity and the culture's ability to persevere through sometimes tragic circumstances. Artists—from 20th century French master Édouard Vuillard to contemporary American painter Kehinde Wiley—enliven the galleries in rotating exhibitions.

The centerpiece of the museum is Culture and Continuity: A Jewish Journey, a permanent exhibit teeming with artifacts, videos, and art that collectively celebrate Jewish identity and the culture's ability to persevere through sometimes tragic circumstances. Artists—from 20th century French master Édouard Vuillard to contemporary American painter Kehinde Wiley—enliven the galleries in rotating exhibitions.

Interactive exhibits such as the Archeology Zone bring kids within earshot of ancient times as they don ancient costumes and weigh, magnify, and analyze vessels just like anthropologists or careful ancient housewares shoppers. Family activities include holiday-themed art classes and workshops, and The Wind Up series invites adults into the museum for an after-hours menagerie of cutting-edge music, film, and theatre. After a day of soaking up history, attendees can nosh at Lox at Cafe Weissman, a certified-kosher cafe whose stained glass windows shine a light on the edible portion of the Jewish journey.

1109 5th Ave
New York,
NY
US

New York City has her bustling waterways to thank for a rich history of art, industry, and cultural development—perhaps more than any other factor. The sea carried in a stream of tens of millions of immigrants and fueled the industrial age in one of the country’s most accessible portals to the world. South Street Seaport Museum’s massive gallery space in Schermerhorn Row Block pays tribute to a bygone age while bridging it to the city’s modern aquatic-shipping and transport industry. Some exhibits illuminate the past, such as the pseudo-marketplace at Coffee, Fish, and the Tattooed Man and the immaculately preserved hotel at Remains of the Stay, while others highlight modern issues such as the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Weighted with history, the museum’s fleet of tugboats, schooners, and sloops stays stalwartly afloat, each with its own story to tell; built in 1885, the Wavertree was one of the last wrought-iron sailing ships commissioned, and the Pioneer has spent more than 120 years feeding the economy with boatloads of lumber, stone, brick, oyster shells, and tourists. The majestic four-masted bark Peking represents the famous German Flying P-Liners, designed to be crewed entirely by birds.

12 Fulton St
New York,
NY
US

Located along the Museum Mile section of Fifth Avenue, the Museum of the City of New York chronicles local culture through an array of exhibitions, interactive programs, publications, and other media. Founded in 1923 and housed in a landmark building, the nonprofit museum hosts temporary exhibitions to complement extensive permanent collections. Hallways and gallery spaces invite guests inside to study historic maps, photographs of life and architecture, and artwork, as well as vintage displays gathering toys, fashion, and furniture—providing more insight into the city's rich character than the diary of Al Pacino. Docents and visiting artists aim to highlight the city's diversity and heritage through public programs and events, such as gallery tours and performances as well as symposiums and panels. A gift shop allows visitors to bring home a taste of the Big Apple via city-spirited books, clothing, posters, music, films, and handmade goods.

1220 5th Ave.
Manhattan,
NY
US