Things To Do In The Dalles

Select Local Merchants

Indian Creek Golf Course's layout snakes through the Hood River Valley between a network of sprawling orchards and wineries with panoramic views of Mount Hood and Mount Adams creating a dramatic backdrop. Water comes into play on 11 holes, including three creeks that bisect fairways to disrupt play and tempt players to take fairway naps to the melodic babbling of their playing partners. On the par 5 fourth hole, precision is paramount, as the dogleg right is entirely fortified by water to the right and the small, narrow green make short putts strenuous with hard-to-read-breaks.

Indian Creek Golf Course won an Environmental Excellence award from Audubon International for its efforts in areas of wildlife and habitat management, chemical-use reduction, and water-quality management. The course and its surrounding land act as a sanctuary to a variety of wildlife, including several species of caddies now endangered because rampant cart use. Course at a Glance: * Par 72 * Three sets of tees * 6,150 yards from the back tees * Rating of 70.8 and slope of 128 from the back tees

3605 Brookside Dr
Hood River,
OR
US

With Imperial River Company, active relaxation isn't an oxymoron. That's because the company lives by its motto: "Actively relaxing on the banks of the Deschutes River." It does this by harnessing the area's rolling hills and serpentine river for a wealth of outdoor getaways. Whitewater rafting acquaints guests with the Deschutes River's undulating waters during guided rafting trips that launch from a private dock and return to the same area for picnics and beach volleyball. Additionally, fishing expeditions help guests reel in wild redside trout and summer steelhead while taking in the postcard views of the locale, and cycling services rent out single and tandem bikes for calming jaunts along winding roads and around canyons.

304 Bakeoven Rd.
Maupin,
OR
US

As they enter the training circle at Curves, female guests come face-to-face with the smiles of other women. And just as points on a circle share a common distance from the circle's center, workout participants share the experiences of those nearby by trading stations throughout the 30-minute training session. One minute is spent on a piece of strength-training equipment built for feminine frames and designed to work two opposing muscle groups with a single movement. Exercisers then move on to a recovery station, where they run, jog, or dance to maintain heart rates and keep platforms in place during momentary losses of gravity.

208 Washington St
The Dalles,
OR
US

Though its once purely utilitarian features have been repurposed as a modern industrial-chic wine bar, Sunshine Mill Winery is still a monument to turn-of-the-century agriculture. The gravity mill’s belt-drive system, for instance, is still wholly intact, and its massive gears hang above the heads of sommeliers pouring Quenett and Copa Di Vino wines in the lounge area. And atop the structure that still houses the mill’s Thomas Edison–designed electric generator, musicians regularly perform to the crowds on the alfresco dining area below.

901 E 2nd St
The Dalles,
OR
US

Located at Skibowl East, The Snow Tube and Adventure Park boasts a variety of cold-weather attractions for all ages, and offers a conveyor lift to the top of the main tube hill on Mt. Hood. Open on weekends and holidays, a host of activities are available including Frosty?s Playland, Indoor Super Play Zone, and the Kid?s Tubing Carousel. Add more thrills during the day with the Extreme Tube Hill for those with more experience, or at night with the recently introduced cosmic tubing. Event space is available for up to 5,000 people.

87000 E Highway 26
Government Camp,
OR
US

Samuel Hill was undoubtedly a visionary in his own right, but having friends in high places didn't hurt him any. In 1907 he purchased 5,300 acres along the Columbia River to establish a Quaker farming community and found the Maryhill Land Company, named after his daughter. Seven years later he set to work building a mansion on the hill overlooking the river. But then his company folded and the mansion was without purpose. Enter friend number one: Parisian dance pioneer Loïe Fuller. She advised him to transform the cavernous building into an art museum. Throughout the next several years, he filled its halls with pieces from around the world, supplemented by works from Loïe's artist friends—including Auguste Rodin. And to further demonstrate his web of camaraderie, another friend of Hill's, Queen Marie of Romania, contributed Orthodox art and icons from her homeland. In 1926, the Queen dedicated the mansion as the Maryhill Museum of Art to a crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers.

And yet the museum wasn't finished. When Hill died in 1931, the museum's board of trustees stepped in to helm the completion of the project. On May 13, 1940, on what would've been Hill's 83rd birthday, they opened the museum to the public. In the years immediately following, Hill collaborator and arts patron Alma de Bretteville Spreckels fortified the museum's already-impressive collection with works of art loaned and gifted from her own home.

Today Maryhill overlooks the same vista, plus a sculpture garden, displaying its diverse collection of art from around the world. In addition to 80 original pieces by Rodin, including The Thinker, paintings by other European and American artists, and the Théâtre de la Mode French fashion exhibition, the museum's halls display Native American works from prehistoric times to the modern age. It also caters to younger minds with an activity room filled with games and child-friendly activity guides that make art accessible to kids so that parents don't have to carve Starry Night into their grilled cheese sandwiches.

35 Maryhill Museum Drive
Goldendale,
WA
US