Movies in Toronto

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Reflecting on this childhood, Chris Keating sometimes feels as if he didn't exist. His parents' divorce left him with very little tangible evidence of his formative years, so he's spent his adult life as a photographer making sure children can look back fondly at warm family memories. Chris Keating and his Calgary staff have made this a reality for more than 3,000 families since opening the doors to Towne Photography in 2006. There, the professional photographic crew shoots posed and candid shots of families, children, couples, and babies at picturesque parks or against their studio backdrops, and they also snap triumphant graduate portraits, intimate prenatal shots, and provocative passport pics that make border crossing a breeze. Their ironclad guarantee allows unsatisfied clients to request reshoots, reprints, or resizing on all photographs, and they vow to remake or recapture any artwork that sustains damage over the years. Chris also takes his photographic knowledge on the road to conduct Betterphoto Workshops across the United States and Canada, teaching novice photographers how to artistically preserve their most precious memories.

2236 Queen St. E
Toronto,
ON
CA

Since opening as the Bonita Theatre in 1911, the city's oldest movie house has undergone numerous transformations, most recently screening Chinese and Hindi films throughout the '80s and '90s and Tamil-language films in the current millennium. Big Picture Cinema is its latest incarnation, specializing in independent and world cinema. Grinder Coffee, the theatre's next door neighbour, concocts gourmet concessions, meals, and coffee for moviegoers before they saunter down the theatre's wood-to-concrete floor and sink into one of 295 seats, lined with marine blue corduroy.

As 5.1 Dolby digital surround sound orbits the audience, 35mm and digital projectors showcase premieres of films that eschew traditional Hollywood fare, including a monthly horror film series in partnership with Fangoria Magazine and weekly Bollywood film reels discovered in the theatre basement during renovations. Local artists also showcase their work each Wednesday followed by coffee and discussion sessions with the audience, where they can ask guest moviemakers about the creative process or how to talk actors out of staying in pirate character during visits to the dentist.

1021-1041 Gerrard Street East
Toronto,
ON
CA

At Magic Lantern Theatres, darkened auditoriums with flickering screens draw audiences into magical worlds where fish can talk, motorcycles leap canyons, and love comes even for those who eat crackers in bed. The partnering multiplex theatres and cinemas show recently released blockbuster flicks at 15 locations spread across Canada, each of which retains its own unique personality and honours any historic roots. In Edmonton, the Princess Theatre’s original 1915 auditorium, complete with balcony, golden drapes, and red walls, accommodates moviegoers with babies or pet hyenas inside a soundproof cry room. In Saskatchewan, the circa-1930 Roxy Theatre preserves the ambience of a Spanish courtyard. As guests find their auditoriums at the Ontario locations, they can admire giant murals by local artist Fred Harrison.

20 Carlton Street
Toronto,
ON
CA

Established: Before 1950

Staff Size: 2?10 people

Average Duration of Services: 2?4 hours

Brands Used: Pepsi

Pro Tip: Box office opens 30 minutes before showtime. Arrive early to get the best seat.

Handicap Accessible: No

Parking: Metered street parking

Recommended Age Group: All Ages

For Susan Flanagan, the Revue Cinema was almost a lost cause. Back in 2006, the theatre had all but shuttered its doors, and was on the brink of closing down for good. Susan hit the streets and pounded the porches in the neighborhood, sold "Save the Revue" t-shirts and buttons, wrote press releases, and did just about everything in her power to raise enough money to keep the theater going. In the processes, she effectively recruited a battalion of volunteers?Revue Film Society?who not only helped with funding, but dedicated their collective manpower to help clean, paint, and even create new art deco light fixtures for the theater for its grand re-opening.

Today, Revue Cinema?a not-for-profit theatre?screens films that range from blockbuster hits to cult classics. In addition to showing new releases, the staff arranges a series of cultural programs such as Silent Sundays, where live piano accompaniment adds vim to North American and European films from the 1910s and 1920s. And in addition to the movies, the snack bar sets the bar for other theatres by selling organic juices and vintage-style pop and candy.

400 Roncesvalles Avenue
Toronto,
ON
CA

At Rainbow Cinemas & Magic Lantern Theatres, darkened auditoriums with flickering screens draw audiences into magical worlds where fish can talk, motorcycles leap canyons, and love comes even for those who eat crackers in bed. The auditoriums show recent blockbusters at 16 multiplex theatres that spread across Canada, each of which retains its own unique personality and honours any historic roots. In Edmonton, the Princess Theatre?s original 1915 auditorium, complete with balcony, golden drapes, and red walls, accommodates moviegoers with babies or pet hyenas inside a soundproof cry room. In Saskatchewan, the circa-1930 Roxy Theatre preserves the ambience of a Spanish courtyard. As guests find their auditorium at the Rainbow Cinemas Ontario locations, they can admire giant murals by local artist Fred Harrison.

500 Rexdale Boulevard
Toronto,
ON
CA

Visit the historic Bloor Hot Docs Cinema to view fun films and intriguing documentaries. Opened in 1913, this cinema is in Toronto’s dynamic Annex neighborhood. The open and airy interior features both floor and balcony seating, perfect for viewing the large projection screen. Now under the new management of Hot Doc, Bloor Cinema plays an exciting selection of Canadian and international documentaries to choose from all year round. They also host special documentary presentations and showcases, including the must-see Doc Soup Series. The Bloor Cinema is part of the new culturally rich Bloor St. Culture Corridor. They also follow an earth-friendly green initiative by using 100 percent green electricity through Bullfrog Power.

506 Bloor St W
Toronto,
ON
CA