French Restaurants in Travilah

Select Local Merchants

The Three Faces of L’Auberge Chez François

Two Generations of History

A lot can happen in a single year in the restaurant business, but, remarkably, very little has changed at L’Auberge Chez François since it opened in 1954. Chef François Haeringer—a native of Alsace, France—opened the restaurant only six years after immigrating to America. Though he didn't know how to speak English when he arrived, his cuisine translated into quick success. In 1976, he moved the eatery to its current 6-acre refuge in the hills, styling it after an Alsatian auberge, or "family inn." There, the restaurant has continued to thrive, first under François and now under his successor, his son Jacques.

Traditional Alsatian Cuisine

Alsatian cuisine is notable for fusing both German and French fare. This influence is readily apparent in dishes such as the Alsatian feast, which pairs sauerkraut, sausage, and pork with duck confit and foie gras. But adherence to Alsatian traditions doesn’t deter the chefs from exploring the East Coast’s own bounty, as evidenced in the veal scaloppini with Virginia ham and the poached Maine lobster with sauternes-butter sauce.

Old-World Ambiance

If L’Auberge Chez François never prepared another morsel of food, people would still come to visit for the ambiance. Embroidered pillows and French murals make the waiting room feel more like someone's living room. In the dining areas, Haeringer family heirlooms lend a dash of authenticity and beauty. In the outdoor courtyard, red wooden chairs and benches mingle among flowering plants, and antique streetlamps illuminate a gazebo nestled amid bushes and hanging shrubbery.

332 Springvale Road
Great Falls,
VA
US

When Sonny Abraham took a job at his father's restaurant, he assumed it would be a temporary arrangement until he received his pilot's license. But it was amid the hot suds of soapy dishes and the clatter of pots and pans that he fell in love with the restaurant industry and began dreaming of starting a fine-dining establishment of his own. In pursuit of his new dream, Sonny secured culinary positions at upscale hotels throughout Washington, DC, even traveling to Switzerland to work in a high-end kitchen. Ten years later, Sonny captains the kitchen of his own restaurant, Brasserie Monte Carlo.

Inside the restaurant, which was very recently REAL certified by the United States Healthful Food Council, Sonny whips up French Mediterranean dishes with housemade sauces and herbs from his own garden. The chef often delivers the still-sizzling dishes to the dining room himself, where diners await their meals over glasses of fine wine. A vivid mural sweeps across one wall, depicting typical scenes from Monte Carlo, from French sunbathers tanning on a beach to an ex-car-insurance salesman working on his first attempt at a romance novel, Even Car-Insurance Salesmen Fall in Love.

7929 Norfolk Ave
Bethesda,
MD
US

Blue 44 is the go-to spot for a moderately-priced, dependable meal in Washington’s Chevy Chase neighborhood. Already considered one of the area’s best restaurants despite its 2011 arrival date, the classic upscale American menu here is versatile without being huge. For appetizers, tackle a pierogi, claw through some lobster mac ‘n’ cheese or down duck confit eggrolls. For something light, there are several options for soup and salad, and sandwiches range from raved-about burgers to crab cakes to a Pittsburgh cheese steak, courtesy of the owner’s Western Pennsylvania heritage. The ample dining room is bathed in dark tones, with a textured tile ceiling and lots of tall, stiff-backed booths. Chandeliers light the main eating area dimly, while simple photographs and painted brick touches fill out the style. Sneak back to the small hooded bar for a drink; there are only a few seats, but the drinks are worth standing for.

5507 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Le Vieux Logis mimics the Old-World charm of its namesake—a famously hospitable lodge in the Dordogne region of France—with rustic decorative touches such as copper pots hanging from timber walls. Cozy tables hold dishes of sautéed sea scallops, baked oysters, and roasted duckling as patrons clink glasses of wine and cocktails from the full bar. Outside, Le Vieux Logis's white façade sports rustic wooden shutters and murals of prosperous country folk overlooking al fresco diners. The heaps of live flowers that broadcast their colors in front of the restaurant helped earn it Bethesda Ever Green's Beauty Spot Award, and complimentary valet parking greets arriving diners.

7925 Old Georgetown Rd
Bethesda,
MD
US

Is Terasol an art gallery, a coffee shop or a French bistro? Yes to all, actually. This Chevy Chase spot serves three square meals a day from its charming café space, where warm lighting and a plate-glass window light up the ample woodwork inside. Even more color comes from the large amount of artisan jewelry, pottery and crafts that hang on the walls or sit inside long, open shelves. As much an artistic shop for locally-made goods as it is a restaurant, Terasol supports DC’s creative side with occasional showings and constant displays of beautiful wares. Of course, they also support the old French countryside, with a rustic menu that ticks off great dishes like a checklist: French onion soup, beef bourguignon, mussels and frites. A warming quiche is available , and the croque monsieur will satisfy the largest of appetites.

5010 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Low key and easy to overlook, thanks in part to its location along a section of Wisconsin Avenue not known much for retail, Matisse is a little French neighborhood masterpiece. The décor and cuisine both offer a touch of inspired artistry and style, with a menu putting a nouvelle twist on French-Mediterranean cuisine. The downstairs is divided into two dining rooms, each laid with white tablecloths, soft lighting and sleek accents. The front is a bit more formal, while the banquettes and fireplace make the back dining room a cozier place to enjoy filet mignon at dinnertime or moules frites at lunch. A stylish staircase leads to the second floor, which is usually used for special events or for overflow on busy nights. But at Matisse, individual diners are likely to feel that every night is special.

4934 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US