Walking in Trenton


Select Local Merchants

The Fulper Family Farmstead's journey started in 1909 when Mary Fulper brought one cow with her to a patch of land in New Jersey and started growing vegetables with her family. Over time, her family grew and so did their business. Throughout the next century, they developed their farm, growing tomatoes for Campbell's Soup, building a state-of-the-art milking parlor for their 80 cows, and installing solar energy and soil conservation methods. Today, you can visit the farm that is still thriving under the gentle guidance of the fifth generation of Fulpers. Explore the farm facilities to see the milking parlor and newborn calf barn up close, or learn about sustainable farming from the compost barn and solar energy system. Visitors can even follow in the farmers' footsteps by making their own butter, ice cream, or milk paint. Farm activities also get kids out in nature with hayrides, an obstacle course, and scavenger hunts.
281 Rocktown Lambertville Rd.
Lambertville,
NJ
US
The Watershed Butterfly Festival, presented by the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association, will teach families about their local environment. Kids can get face to antennae with butterflies and other insects at the insect zoo, and families can explore nature on hayrides, walks, and at the festival's interactive enviro-zones. After learning all about a butterfly's lifecycle and rambling along on a trail, guests can take in the fest's butterfly parade. Other entertainment will include live music from Grammy-nominated kids' artist Miss Amy and classic rock from The Dadz. Food and art will also be available from local artisans.
31 Titus Mill Road
Pennington,
NJ
US
Philadelphians and out-of-towners alike can find refuge from the city by way of the Forbidden Drive, a scenic expanse that extends from Chestnut Hill to Manayunk, yet feels miles away from urban life. As part of the Wissahickon Valley Park?which covers 1,800 acres?the wooded trail shelters joggers, cyclists, hikers, and even those on horseback as they explore the area's natural flora and fauna. A frequent spot for organized races, the trail is also marked by historic and geological sites. The Friends of Wissahickson, or FOW, is a non-profit organization that started in 1924. With over 1,600 members, they work in conjunction with the Philadelphia Parks and Recreation to restore historical structures, eliminate invasive plants, monitor watershed management, and restore trails with the Sustainable Trails Initiative.
Valley Green Rd At Wissahickon
Flourtown,
PA
US
The Appalachian Trail stretches from Georgia to Maine, running 2,180 miles over mountains, rocky slopes, and deep valleys. Since it was established in 1925, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) has cared for the trail, maintaining 250,000 acres of public land. The organization educates hikers on Leave No Trace camping and why it's not a good idea to challenge a bear to a hugging contest. Volunteers and trail crews build and repair shelters along the footpath and engage youth and community members in outdoor activities. In addition to these human-oriented services, the ATC works to protect endangered species living along the trail and to preserve the land's watershed streams and migratory corridor.
1600 North Broad Street
Philadelphia,
PA
US
The JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes & 5K empowers runners and walkers to contribute to the battle against Type 1 diabetes one stride at a time. Racers dash through a marked 5K track, testing their endurance and pursuing a personal best—whether by shaving off a few seconds, finishing a race for the first time, or crossing the line before their shadow does. Attendees can also demonstrate support by enrolling their dogs, who can also take part in the race. Whether running or walking, all participants work toward the same goal: raising funds and awareness for JDRF’s mission to contribute to treatments, and eventually a cure, for Type 1 diabetes.
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia,
PA
US
Those who bring binoculars to this 1,000-acre protected expanse are likely to spot some of the 300 bird species who pass through on their migrations, whereas those who look down might find a locally endangered species of turtle. Bring along a picnic basket or fishing pole to spend a day unwinding in the sun.
8601 Lindbergh Boulevard
Philadelphia,
PA
US
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