Opera in Washington, D. C.

Select Local Merchants

Hershey Theatre

The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.

601 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Dance Place first leapt onto the scene more than three decades ago as an educational and performing arts company that toured local schools. In the years since, it has grown into a multi-faceted operation and source of both entertainment and instruction.

Every weekend, Dance Place dazzles crowds with performances in modern dance, African Dance, performance art, and spoken word. Rather than hiring a sketch artist to doodle each dance step into a flipbook, spectators can learn the moves they see on stage by enrolling in one of Dance Place's programs, or by dropping into an adult or children's class. Dance Place has remained true to its roots through its continued support of local schools, and to this day organizes family-friendly performances, workshops, and school assemblies.

3225 8th St NE
Washington,
DC
US

It is a truth generally known that theater people are odd birds. At times, the colorful, loud, and oftentimes naked presence of these wild creatures might throw one off their guard. There was a time (ahem, the seventies and eighties) when theater was less of an experiment of story-telling and more of a parade of power chords (ahem, Andrew Lloyd Webber). At Wooly Mammoth Theater Company they have sought to change all that and to let the beast out of the cage! Buy a ticket to an enchanting and fantastically entertaining season at Wooly Mammoth. Here, they explore the new, the innovative, the odd, the bold, and the terrifying! They do it all with reckless abandon at a black box theater in Washington, DC. This is a place to share ideas and to let the imagination roam.

641 D St NW
Washington,
DC
US

Converted from a historic 1930s art-deco theater, the modern iteration of the Arlington Cinema & Drafthouse is a combination restaurant, movie theater, and performance space. Besides screening blockbusters, the venue also hosts regular comedy shows featuring standups who have shared their skills on The Tonight Show, David Letterman, and Conan O'Brien. Between laughs, audience members can take bites from a complete menu or sips of selections from a full-service bar.

610 F St NW
Washington,
DC
US

As their motto goes, "It's all about the music." Eschewing props, costumes, and staging for a focus on the sounds of voices and instruments, the Washington Concert Opera seeks to thrill audiences with performances by some of the profession's leading lights. Their stripped-down approach allows the company to focus on rarely produced works, from little-known Rossinis to classic Puccini B-sides.

730 21st Street Northwest
Washington,
DC
US

To showcase the work of its young scribes, once a year Young Playwrights’ Theater hosts its New Play Festival, providing an opportunity for budding playwrights to see the fruits of their creative labor flourish on stage. Watching their work as it's performed for an appreciative audience may be a student's first taste of artistic accomplishment, substantiating in them a desire to expand their horizons academically and creatively. The students collaborate with professional actors, dramaturges, and directors to produce 15 student-written plays during three nights. In addition to its benefits to the writers as individuals, the festival—which audiences attend free of charge—enhances public regard for young artists and fosters a dialogue regarding matters of vital importance to the community.

2437 15th St NW
Washington,
DC
US