Sightseeing in Washington, D. C.


Select Local Merchants

  • Tudor Place
    The story of the descendants of the nation’s First Family is told at Tudor Place, an historic home hidden away on a Georgetown side street. The five-acre estate was the home of Martha and George Washington’s granddaughter Martha Parke Custis Peter. Five more generations of the family lived here before it became a National Historic Landmark in the 1980s, and now the notable home contains more of George and Martha’s memorabilia than anywhere outside of Mount Vernon. But because the home was occupied by members of the Washington family for nearly 200 years, its riches span the centuries, from original keepsakes handed down by Martha herself to more current pieces that tell the family’s rich history. The extensive gardens are particularly lovely in the spring, when many of the period flowers bloom.
    Read More
    1644 31st St NW
    Washington, DC US
  • Smithsonian Institution
    When British scientist and visionary James Smithson left his estate to the United States, he hoped that it would one day become ?an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.? Smithson got his wish, and then some. His generous gift transformed into The Smithsonian Institution, the world?s largest museum and research complex. Since its founding in 1846, The Smithsonian has blossomed into exactly what Smithson envisioned: a place where knowledge is celebrated, advanced, and shared with new generations. Anchored on the National Mall, the Institution?s many branches explore the worlds of art, science, history, and culture, inviting guests to discover their origins and see what the future might have in store.
    Read More
    1000 Jefferson Dr SW
    Washington, DC US
  • Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. escorts guests on an interactive journey through American history. Only here, the past isn't manifested through movies, but through wax. Inside, The President's Gallery brings visitors face-to-face with all 44 US presidents, from Harry Truman to Abe Lincoln and his signature spinning bowtie. Cultural leaders, such as Martin Luther King Jr., stand tall nearby, and rock stars such as Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan compose silent jam sessions in the Music Room. Hollywood stars, sports heroes, and nonpresidential political figures round out the collection, which can be visited 365 days a year.
    Read More
    1001 F St NW
    Washington, DC US
  • Hinckley Pottery Studio
    Led by a former New York City gallery owner, Hinckley Pottery's experienced staff is adept at teaching fresh potters how to turn mud into masterpiece. The intimately sized, one-hour Try It! course helps patrons bone up on pottery-wheel basics and decide whether or not to pursue more-advanced wheel techniques, such as creating a vase using only your thighs. The 3,300-square-foot studio, housed in an industrial warehouse, boasts 14 electric wheels, two kick/electric combination wheels, and one treadle wheel, in addition to two electric kilns, two gas kilns, and a propane-fired raku kiln. Try it! courses are available at select times. Click here for details and to find a time to meet likeminded crafters, channel workweek stress into a mound of clay, or craft a large bowl that can hold novelty sized paper clips. Call ahead to reserve your space in class.
    Read More
    1707 Kalorama Rd NW
    Washington, DC US
  • The National Museum of Women In The Arts
    Since 1981, this museum has celebrated the contributions women have made to the world of art. With a focus on educating the public, the museum’s curators fill the halls with art by women of diverse eras and nationalities—a collection that includes 4,500 works by more than 1,000 artists, including Frida Kahlo, Nan Goldin, and Lee Krasner.
    Read More
    1250 New York Ave NW
    Washington, DC US
  • The Kreeger Museum
    In 1959, David and Carmen Kreeger began a personal collection of modern art, forming a shared vision based on creative passion instead of investment. David Kreeger himself said, ?Art that embodies the creative spirit of men transcends the value of money." In 1994, four years after David?s death, the Kreeger Museum opened under the direction of Judy A. Greenberg with the mission of enhancing ?the understanding and appreciation of art, architecture and music,? three of the Kreegers? lifelong passions and favorite Jeopardy! categories. Today, their personal acquisitions form the foundation of a collection of 19th- and 20th-century paintings from masters such as Monet, C?zanne, and Picasso, along with works of traditional African and Asian art. Art pervades every inch of the museum campus, from the 5.5-acre wooded sculpture garden surrounding the building to the building itself designed by Pritzker Prize?winning architect Philip Johnson using a modernist approach and limestone imported from Italy. The building uses light and movement to guide visitors through the great hall, gallery spaces, and recital hall for performances of Beethoven?s B-sides.
    Read More
    2401 Foxhall Rd. NW
    Washington, DC US
Advertisement