Sushi in Washington, D. C.

Select Local Merchants

When it first opened in March of 2001, Tsunami Sushi & Lounge was on the vanguard of local businesses and shops to settle and thrive in the 14th street corridor near Thomas Circle. Today, the ultramodern lounge relishes in its place as a nerve center for nightlife, treating guests to fresh maki and nigiri, as well as lip-smacking udon, steak, and tempura dishes. Strings of sparkling crystal globes form huge overhanging chandeliers that cast twinkling light upon brick walls, eggshell-white armchairs, and black leather benches. Guests follow a glass-lined staircase up to the restaurant's second story, gazing out upon the bustling streetscapes and poorly hidden bald spots on the sidewalk below.

1326 14th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

True to its name, Hashi Sushi Georgetown's culinary craftsmen bundle and roll a variety of sushi rolls, but that's not the only recipe in the restaurant's cookbook. The chefs also acquaint diners with traditional Japanese and Korean dishes they may not have tried, such as fresh udon or ramen noodle soups tossed with breaded tonkatsu, or bento boxes of spicy bulgogi strewn with kimchi. On the weekends, the restaurant combines its dignified sushi-bar airs with a burst of nightlife fun replete with sake bombs and energetic crowds, before turning back into a pumpkin at 11 p.m.

1073 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Spices has clean, modern lines and an open sushi bar where diners can enjoy a visual feast while feasting. Chef Jessie Yan's menu features contemporary and home-style Asian recipes. Start with Sichuan Dragon Dumplings (chicken, watercress, and shiitake mushrooms, $6) before launching an all-out consumption attack on an unsuspecting specialty maki Dancing Eel roll (barbecue eel, crabstick, masago, avocado, and cucumber, $11) or the green curry (chicken, beef, or pork swimming in rich, creamy coconut curry with eggplant and basil, served in a brass wok; lunch $11, dinner $13). For large appetites, the big duck roasted and served with pancakes, cucumbers, scallions, and plum sauce (half duck $15, whole $30) is capable of occupying most unused stomach storage, while a zesty grilled dish such as the Vietnamese grilled shrimp, served with a Vietnamese spring roll, lettuce, cucumber, mint, and roasted peanuts over vermicelli (lunch $12, dinner $14) gently tucks hunger under a culinary blanket.

3333 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

The menu at Kushi is swimming with savory sushi treats and grilled delicacies. Fresh maki is skillfully rolled with yellowtail and scallion or salmon and avocado ($7 each) before being sliced into six easily consumable pieces. Kushi provides a bevy of combination platters for indecisive eaters, such as the bara chirashi with assorted sashimi diced and mixed into sushi rice ($27), or the chef’s choice, which features twelve miscellaneous sushi creations ($40). The authentic robata charcoal grill produces refined tailgate-worthy treats, including salmon fillet ($9) and mahogany quail stuffed with duck-sausage ($12). Working on the basic principal that meals taste better on a stick, a variety of kushiyaki (skewered) eats are offered, such as pork-stuffed shishito pepper ($5). Round out the feast with a special house-blend seaweed salad ($6).

465 K St
Washington,
DC
US

Wasabi cycles through a seasonally fresh assortment of bold ingredients, which come in plenty of forms beyond the roll variety. Most plates are moderately priced and portioned with the intention of pairing. Start out raw with fresh sashimi, such as salmon ($4) or yellow tail ($5), or snag a more complicated arrangement of wasabi and pork shumai dumplings in a vinegar chili soy sauce ($4). Give any plate wings by pairing it with a four-glass sake flight ($7–$20).

908 17th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

Uni serves fresh sushi rolls and classic Japanese cuisine in a welcoming, lively atmosphere. Nudge napping taste buds with a starter such as black pepper calamari, crisply deep-fried and served with a spicy wasabi cocktail sauce ($5.95) before moving on to a cooked or uncooked entree. Sushi neophytes can opt for a teriyaki or tempura plate, or dip their toes into the seafood pool with a nibble of namesake sea urchin (uni) nigiri ($6.50). Snack on signature sushi offerings including the mango salmon roll filled with refreshing mint, mango, and cucumber ($6), or boldly joust the fiery red dragon roll sporting tasty twin flames of lobster and tuna ($12). Finish with a delectable dessert such as ice cream tempura, ice cream coated in a fried shell, and coated again in a tasty oxymoron.

2122 P St NW
Washington,
DC
US