Sightseeing in Wesley Heights


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In 1959, David and Carmen Kreeger began a personal collection of modern art, forming a shared vision based on creative passion instead of investment. David Kreeger himself said, ?Art that embodies the creative spirit of men transcends the value of money." In 1994, four years after David?s death, the Kreeger Museum opened under the direction of Judy A. Greenberg with the mission of enhancing ?the understanding and appreciation of art, architecture and music,? three of the Kreegers? lifelong passions and favorite Jeopardy! categories. Today, their personal acquisitions form the foundation of a collection of 19th- and 20th-century paintings from masters such as Monet, C?zanne, and Picasso, along with works of traditional African and Asian art. Art pervades every inch of the museum campus, from the 5.5-acre wooded sculpture garden surrounding the building to the building itself designed by Pritzker Prize?winning architect Philip Johnson using a modernist approach and limestone imported from Italy. The building uses light and movement to guide visitors through the great hall, gallery spaces, and recital hall for performances of Beethoven?s B-sides.
2401 Foxhall Rd. NW
Washington,
DC
US
The artists and affiliates at the nonprofit organization The Bead Studio get the creative gears turning in children's brains with bead-related classes and events that emphasize improving art education for the DC-area youth. The Bead Studio hosts seasonal festivals spotlighting a slew of artisan-bead vendors to raise money for their mission and benefit other philanthropic, bead-related foundations such as Beads of Courage and BeadforLife. More than a dozen types of workshops led by instructors with impressive portfolios also benefit these causes, covering kid-centric beading techniques and business-related tips for adults wishing to start their own bead shop or kids looking to barter with the local ice-cream man.
4450 Wisconsin Avenue Northwest
Washington,
DC
US
French-trained photographer E. David Luria loves many subjects, but he directs most of his attention toward Washington, DC's historic architecture. His images, which lovingly depict the city's landmarks, have been published in Time magazine as well as several local Washington papers. Luria teaches tricks of his trade privately for the Smithsonian Resident Associates Program, but also through Washington Photo Safari's tours. Luria, along with a team of 11 other instructors?many experienced independent photographers and photojournalists?shepherd small groups through the capital's streets, gardens, and halls while teaching them photographic techniques. These include how to use selective focus, control F-stops and shutter speeds, and remove vampires from pictures taken at night. They then help participants practice these skills on expeditions through buildings such as the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington National Cathedral, and the National Building Museum. More seasonal tours let guests document the short-lived cherry blossom season, challenging them to capture striking tableaus of the pink petals from land or water. They also teach composition among the verdant garden landscapes and elegant buildings at Hillwood Gardens and the US Botanic Garden to foster tourists? appreciation for nature and their ability to heckle squirrels.
4545 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US
Adventures for Creative Tourists helps DC visitors explore the city's more artistic side. Tour guides lead groups to museums and art galleries across the Georgetown and Dupont Circle neighborhoods, helping them get a deeper look at the area's art than what you can find on the mall. Though, if you do want to see the top museums, custom tours can help you explore the Smithsonian National Gallery of Art, Portrait Museum, the Anderson House Museum, and the Kreeger Museum. Tours include the option to upgrade to transportation and an option to stop for meals so that you don't feel tempted to nibble on a still-life bowl of fruit.
1670 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US
Mangia DC Food Tours takes its name from the Italian interjection, "Mangia!", which roughly translates to both "Eat!" and "Enjoy!" It's fitting, then, that the company's signature tour focuses on Italian food, especially restaurants near historic Dupont Circle. In addition to visiting eateries and sampling foods, the tour includes insights into other hidden gems found throughout the neighborhood.
3430 Connecticut Avenue Northwest
Washington,
DC
US
Is Terasol an art gallery, a coffee shop or a French bistro? Yes to all, actually. This Chevy Chase spot serves three square meals a day from its charming café space, where warm lighting and a plate-glass window light up the ample woodwork inside. Even more color comes from the large amount of artisan jewelry, pottery and crafts that hang on the walls or sit inside long, open shelves. As much an artistic shop for locally-made goods as it is a restaurant, Terasol supports DC’s creative side with occasional showings and constant displays of beautiful wares. Of course, they also support the old French countryside, with a rustic menu that ticks off great dishes like a checklist: French onion soup, beef bourguignon, mussels and frites. A warming quiche is available , and the croque monsieur will satisfy the largest of appetites.
5010 Connecticut Avenue Northwest
Washington,
DC
US
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