Museums in Woodley Park


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  • Dumbarton Oaks
    These stunning gardens, designed by Beatrix Farrand, are a popular urban oasis, especially when the fragrant cherry blossoms are in full bloom. In fact, National Geographic was so smitten with them, it named them among the Top 10 Gardens in the world. Meanwhile, inside the museum, a brilliant collection explores Byzantine and pre-Columbian art, including illuminated manuscripts, Eucharistic vessels, and Mayan stonework.
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    1703 32nd St NW
    Washington, DC US
  • National Zoological Park
    Amidst more than 2,000 animals, two stand out: Tian Tian and Mei Xiang, the famed giant pandas. But there’s plenty more to see at this free zoo, including orangutans that traverse a series of towers and cables 35 feet above spectators’ heads.
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    3000 Block Of Connecticut Ave
    Washington, DC US
  • Tudor Place
    The story of the descendants of the nation’s First Family is told at Tudor Place, an historic home hidden away on a Georgetown side street. The five-acre estate was the home of Martha and George Washington’s granddaughter Martha Parke Custis Peter. Five more generations of the family lived here before it became a National Historic Landmark in the 1980s, and now the notable home contains more of George and Martha’s memorabilia than anywhere outside of Mount Vernon. But because the home was occupied by members of the Washington family for nearly 200 years, its riches span the centuries, from original keepsakes handed down by Martha herself to more current pieces that tell the family’s rich history. The extensive gardens are particularly lovely in the spring, when many of the period flowers bloom.
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    1644 31st St NW
    Washington, DC US
  • The President Woodrow Wilson House
    The President Woodrow Wilson House opens a window onto the private life of the nation's 28th president. This home on S Street is where the president settled down after leading the nation through World War I, creating the League of Nations, and winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Architect Waddy Butler Wood designed the home and gardens in the Georgian Revival style with a marble entryway and grand staircase, book-lined study, and a solarium overlooking the garden. Preserved the way it looked on the year of his death, President Wilson's home contains remarkable memorabilia from his life, including a Steinway piano from the White House and a mosaic he received from Pope Benedict XV. The house has now been a museum for half a century and is open to the public.
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    2340 S Street Northwest
    Washington, DC US
  • Textile Museum
    The Textile Museum is finding a new home in 2014, moving to the campus of George Washington University. There, inside their roomy, airy new digs, the unique facility will continue to dutifully display fabrics and rugs from around the world, highlighting cultural works and important pieces across time. Since the museum was founded nearly 90 years ago, the collection has expanded to encompass some 19,000 objects, and spans a full spectrum of non-Western textile arts across nearly 5,000 years. Featured shows cluster objects together thoughtfully to create unique displays, while the overall mission of the museum is to unite textiles from across cultures to explore expressions of individual, cultural, political and social identity. The facility will also showcase the Textile Museum’s world-renowned historic collections, and will present special exhibitions covering everything from contemporary textiles to fashion.
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    2320 S St NW
    Washington, DC US
  • Dumbarton House
    Anyone who visits Dumbarton House follows in the footsteps of the country’s fourth First Lady, Dolley Madison, who took shelter there as the War of 1812 raged and the British army edged closer to the White House. Since her visit, the Americans have defeated the British, and the house has been transformed into a museum with a collection of more than 1,000 historical artifacts that transport visitors back to the United States’ formative years. Once inhabited by Joseph Nourse, the first Register of the Treasury, from 1804 through 1813, the home showcases the family’s documents, such as journals, as well as furniture, silver, and other federal period decorative art from the turn of the 19th century. The house itself was built in the same period, exemplifying the clean lines and symmetry that characterized the era’s Federal architecture, with wings on either side of its main block.
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    2715 Q Street NW
    Washington, DC US