Vegetarian Restaurants in Woodley Park

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TAAN Noodles is a modern homage to traditional izakayas (sake bars) and ramen shops. The Adams-Morgan spot has found ways to present unexpected ingredients into the classic Japanese soup.

Hunting for the Perfect Ramen

Ramen is served at tens of thousands of eateries throughout the world, but there's something special about the version at TAAN Noodles. Part of the secret lies in chef Michael Than's signature spice blend. Aficionados are also drawn by Than's use of unique ingredients?garlic chips show up in a vegan ramen with soy-milk broth, for instance, and pickled cucumbers add an acidic tang to the duck-confit ramen with scallions.

Japan's Rice Wines & Aged Spirits

TAAN Noodles' sake list hits a range of flavor profiles, with bottles that range from dry to semi-sweet. There are a few specialty cocktails as well, such as the old-fashioned-like Dr. Sun Yat-sen, made from 12-year-aged Japanese whiskey, simple syrup, and aromatic bitters.

1817 Columbia Rd NW
Washington,
DC
US

At the newly managed Shawarma Spot, the sounds of sizzling vegetables mingle with the rich scent of shawarma cooking. Slow-turning spits grill the restaurant's signature shawarma throughout the day, creating a savory stuffing for fluffy pita sandwiches and accidentally hypnotizing unassuming customers. Open-face pides cradle stuffings of vegetables and meat in a pita-like boat of warm bread, and sides of seasoned fries pair with any of the menu's main dishes.

2418 18th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

The counter staff at Amsterdam Falafel Shop fries their signature fare right before your eyes and hands you your sandwich roughly three minutes after ordering. But it’s a collaborative process. After that, you can head to the garnish bar and dress the deep-fried chickpea balls any way you like, ladling, scooping, and drizzling on any of the 21 garnishes, pickles, and sauces to craft a meal that’s customized to your taste buds or those of the roommate living off your crumbs. And, in the Dutch tradition, the shop also serves fries that may be jazzed up with a choice of dressings, including dutch mayo, homemade peanut ‘saus,’ malt vinegar, and Old Bay seasoning.

2425 18th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

While DC sports several Ethiopian restaurants, Das Ethiopian may be the only one with white tablecloths. But don’t worry, you’ll still get your hands dirty inside, thanks to the native culture of foregoing flatware in favor of injera, the spongy bread from the region that’s used to scoop and sop up anything on your plate. That could be anything from Ethiopian-style short ribs to spinach and rice with chicken infillay or beef zizil tibs. Don’t worry if you can’t traverse the menu; helpful waitstaff are more than ready to jump in with recommendations, or just help you navigate your way to something special. Vegans will find much to love, with a wide assortment of meat and dairy-free options to choose from – plus all you can eat bread, of course. Beyond the tablecloths, this charming eatery shines with plenty of natural light, high-backed chairs and touching black and white photographs.

1201 28th St
Washington,
DC
US

Nothing trumped family for JoAnna, who left behind a career in New York City to return to Washington, DC, in 1980 to care for her aging mother Filomena. JoAnna's homecoming brought back memories of Filomena's grand family meals, and she was saddened to find that DC lacked a place to enjoy old world?style comfort food in a space that felt more like a home than a restaurant. She spent the next three years transforming two dilapidated buildings into the place she envisioned, replicating her family's old dining room with some of her mother's actual furniture, antiques, and knick knacks. It was only natural to grace the restaurant with her mother's name.

All of JoAnna's hard work paid off. With its eclectic assortment of Queen Anne?style dining chairs, hanging plants, and gilt-framed paintings, Filomena Ristorante couldn't be more inviting. The chefs continue the homey ambiance with Filomena's time-honored recipes for handmade pastas, mozzarella-draped chicken and veal, and rich sauces. This selection includes everything from veal marsala with shiitake mushrooms and shallots to linguine with lobster?a favorite of former President Bill Clinton, according to the Travel Channel.

1063 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Flavors of India manages to embrace the spirit of home cooking despite the fact that its home is located half a world away. Basing their menu on the cuisine of northern India, the chefs make everything from paneer cheese cubes and yogurt to cilantro and tamarind chutneys in-house. They also embrace the region's culinary techniques by charbroiling skewers of marinated meat and seafood within a clay tandoor oven. The recipes' combinations of aromatic herbs and sauces stem from centuries of tradition; however, the chefs do allow diners to customize their orders by specifying the amount of fiery spice—creating a mild entree or a curry capable of smelting a meteorite.

2524 L Street Northwest
Washington,
DC
US