Walking in Watertown

Select Local Merchants

Established in 1896, William J. Devine Golf Course inspires greens-goers to hone their strokes at one of the oldest public courses in the nation. William J. Devine Golf Course's more than 6,600 yards were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the famed architect behind New York’s Central Park and the concept of sea level, and redesigned by the “Michelangelo of golf” Donald Ross. The course has earned a 72.1 course rating, a bent-grass-slope rating of 120, and a “va-va-voom” rating on the gorgeous index. Across nine holes (up to a $29 value), putters maneuver through manicured fairways and precarious sand traps on a golf cart (an $11 value) as they sense the ghostly presence of legends, including Willie Campbell, who became the first head professional at the course; precocious prodigy putter Bobby Jones, who fine-tuned his stroke on the grounds; and George F. Grant, the inventor of the golf tee and organic astroturf, who pioneered minority play at the course.

1 Circuit Drive
Boston,
MA
US

Freewheeling around historic hallmarks and architecture, Boston By Segway, formerly Boston Gliders, has led more than 100,000 sightseers through Bean Town atop intuitive, easy-to-maneuver segways. Tours, which kick off every half-hour, range from one to two hours; the shorter version trundles down Boston's Harborwalk, and the longer sojourn ventures past historic hotspots including Faneuil Hall and Bunker Hill. To get acquainted with the segway, all upright rollers speed through a half-hour how-not-to-crash course, getting acquainted with the natural, fluid steering and learning how to propel the vehicle forward using a carrot tied to a stick. Armed with digital cameras, the urban sherpas snap shots throughout the tour for purchase afterward, and customers may take their own pictures as long as they briefly hop off the segway.

75 Commercial Street
Boston,
MA
US

Bastions of the abolitionist movement, Boston and its progressive citizens helped motivate activists across the nation to stand against slavery, thus fanning a flame that contributed to the Civil War. During a 90-minute Boston Civil War tour, groups walk among historically significant sites where figureheads such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison publicly asserted their outrage and sought refuge from enraged mobs. While strolling through Beacon Hill on Sunday, knowledgeable guides point out the African Meeting House—a recruitment center for Massachusetts' all-black regiment—and the homes of famous authors such as Louisa May Alcott, who pulled from her experience as a Union Army nurse to write Hospital Sketches in 1863.

139 Tremont Street
Boston,
MA
US

A maze of megalithic chambers and hallways made by man more than 4,000 years ago nestles into the snow- or moss-covered woods at America’s Stonehenge. Guests meander along a trail, marveling at one of the oldest constructions in the United States, complete with inscriptions, eating areas, and evidence of prehistoric art classes. Explorers delve into Stonehenge's history, learning about its use as an accurately aligned astronomical calendar, its role in the Underground Railroad, and the theories about who actually built it. Nearby, eight fuzz balls graze in the alpaca habitat, offering up skeins of yarn spun from their fluffy locks. Winter months coat the site's 105 sprawling acres with crunchy layers of snow, perfect for adventurous snowshoe outings or piggybacking on a snowman.

105 Haverhill Rd
Salem,
NH
US